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Mother of Pearl Asian Lacquer Wooden Black Jewellery Trinket Keepsake Treasure Gift Drawer Box Organizer with Imaginary Flowers Design
Mother of Pearl Asian Lacquer Wooden Black Jewellery Trinket Keepsake Treasure Gift Drawer Box Organizer with Imaginary Flowers Design

4.0 out of 5 stars Lovely item, well packaged, 25 Mar. 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
My only quibble with this item is that it's a little smaller than I was hoping, but then again, I didn't have a tape measure! It will still fit in plenty of rings, necklaces and earrings, and the finish is lovely. Delivery was also very quick, and the packing was extremely thorough! Recommended as a gift for anyone who wants a special trinket box.


The Red Velvet Turnshoe
The Red Velvet Turnshoe
by Cassandra Clark
Edition: Paperback

6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Great premise, disappointing execution, 17 Jun. 2011
I was intrigued by the blurb of this novel, but I have to confess my expectations were disappointed. As a character, Hildegard seems somewhat lacking. She's nice, and shows courage when required, but...more of an automaton than a human being. She's perhaps a little too good, a little too much the victim of circumstance. I don't rightly know why an assassin would bother trailing halfway across Europe after her. Despite having not one but three admirers in the book, she seems oblivious to all of it. And it would undoubtedly have helped if I'd read the first book in the series, because the number of characters introduced towards the end becomes bewildering. I could forgive that if it weren't for a meandering plot with a fizzer of an ending. One minute Hildegard's going to Rome, then the next she gets a letter telling her it's Florence, with no explanation. Sidelines go absolutely nowhere. What of Pierrekyn's antecedents? Who the hell is the shadowy Countess in Florence? She seems like a major player, only to make a brief and ultimately toothless cameo. And virtually everybody takes a turn as the possible murderer, throwing out threatening and elliptical comments for no apparent reason, simply to add to the atmosphere of menace. A bit more about the cross, the supposed crux - aha - of the story, would have been nice too.

In my estimation there are far better medieval murder mysteries out there, including Ariana Franklin, 'Death and the Devil' by Frank Schatzing, and (getting into Tudor times) C J Sansom. But it's early days for Hildegard, and maybe future books will improve.


Murder in the Forum (A Libertus Mystery of Roman Britain)
Murder in the Forum (A Libertus Mystery of Roman Britain)
by Rosemary Rowe
Edition: Paperback

5.0 out of 5 stars What a shame it's out of print!, 8 May 2011
I can only hope someone, somewhere, picks up the rights to Rowe's backlist, because this is a cracking read. Some of the Libertus books can be a bit average, but definitely not this one. It starts with an exceptionally snooty Roman pulling up in a carriage dragging a dead slave behind it, who'd failed to show proper respect. Right from the first, you know you're going to enjoy seeing what happens to this man. Sure enough, he dies...and it may not have been an accident. Enter a Glevum official who grieves his dead dog over his house guest, several mysterious vials of poison, an impostor masquerading as a Celtic nobleman, a lovesick youth, a conspiracy against the state, and Libertus himself up for treason, and you have one of Rowe's wittier and more puzzling mysteries. Get hold of a copy if you can.


The Vestal Vanishes (Libertus Mysteries of Roman Britain)
The Vestal Vanishes (Libertus Mysteries of Roman Britain)
by Rosemary Rowe
Edition: Hardcover
Price: £19.99

13 of 13 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Guaranteed to keep you guessing, 8 May 2011
Those who think no one could possibly surpass Lindsey Davis when it comes to Roman mysteries should give this a go. Sure, it lacks the same wit as Falco and the crew, but the sheer twistiness of The Vestal Vanishes makes it a complete standout. I can only assume Rowe parted ways with her previous publisher because the sales figures weren't matching expectations, but this book shows she fully deserves better. The retired vestal of the title, Audelia, is due to marry a wealthy Roman, but disappears from a moving carriage before she reaches the wedding. Instead, our hero Libertus makes a grisly find - a torso with no head and no hands. What it does have is a sprig of oak leaves and mistletoe tucked into the gown - a clear sign that Druids are involved. But how could they have killed her without anyone seeing? And why? It's a classic locked room mystery set in a Roman carriage, complete with a serious kicker, as the vestal's niece also vanishes from a locked room without a trace. Is it magic? Or is someone not who they seem to be? The ending contains surprise upon surprise upon surprise, and even if you can guess some of it, you definitely won't guess the lot. If you like this, I also recommend Rowe's earlier book Murder in the Forum. Though it's now out of print, buy it secondhand, it's well worth it.
Comment Comment (1) | Permalink | Most recent comment: May 10, 2011 4:52 PM BST


Going Postal [DVD]
Going Postal [DVD]
Dvd ~ David Suchet
Price: £9.07

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Good, but not great, 19 April 2011
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Going Postal [DVD] (DVD)
It helps that I haven't read Going Postal in a while, but I quite enjoyed this adaptation. I thought the two leads were brilliant - I actually liked Adora Belle better in the film than the books - and I think even those who aren't familiar with the Discworld would have been entertained by it. Seeing the soft-spoken Hercule Poirot as a murderous villain with a deep voice was also a constant source of amusement. There were some touching moments as well as laugh out loud ones. However, there were a few things that grated. Some of Moist's outbursts (especially towards his employees) were deeply out of character, Angua was far too sinister, and Vetinari totally lacked the dry humour so obvious in the books. The golems looked a bit 'undercooked' and cheap. The eerie ghosts in the clacks that gave depth to the original story were all but absent...and there were other seemingly unnecessary changes that I won't go into here. All in all, far better than 'Hogfather' but still not as good as the book.


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