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How to choose Camshafts and Time Tune Them for Maximum Power(Speedpro)
How to choose Camshafts and Time Tune Them for Maximum Power(Speedpro)
by Des Hammill
Edition: Paperback
Price: 12.59

2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars oh dear!, 19 Oct 2012
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
As someone who knows a bit about engine tuning (and especially camshafts) the only word I can find to describe this book is - rubbish. The author clearly knows nothing of how the four timings of a camshaft correlate with the rest of an engine, especially the exhaust length and diameter - or, indeed, how the inlet diameter and length come into the equation too. The effect of exhaust lead over inlet is completely disregarded (it appears the author is unaware of the link). There is also a complete lack of understanding regarding advancing or retarding camshafts - either as a whole or, if twin-cam - individually and how changes here can move power within the rev range.
My advice to anyone hoping to get 'maximum power' from their engines is go buy a book from someone who actually knows what they're talking about.


How to Power Tune Jaguar XK: 3.4, 3.8 and 4.2 Litre Engines (Speed Pro)
How to Power Tune Jaguar XK: 3.4, 3.8 and 4.2 Litre Engines (Speed Pro)
by Des Hammill
Edition: Paperback

2.0 out of 5 stars average, 19 Oct 2012
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Having just complied a comment on this author's book on SU carbs (save your money) I'll be slightly more generous on this one - but not much. As I said in my other analysis, this author is lauded as 'an experienced race-engine builder'. Methinks not or, if he is, I bet his engines didn't win many races! The book suggests in its introduction that it is about 'getting as much power as possible from the Jaguar XK engine'. I don't think so. To build a race engine requires substantially more knowledge than appears in this book. Where's the reference to dry sumping and the correlation between camshaft and exhaust diameter / length to name just two? Where are the tables and figures identifying modifications with bhp gains? Where is the analysis of piston dwell at TDC resulting from long stroke and longish con-rods and the consequential relationship with camshaft timings? Missing.
In the book's defence, however, it does contain some interesting information on D types and it might save the casual owner who just wants to 'get a little bit more' from his Jaguar from going down the wrong road. If you want to go racing, however, this book is probably best avoided.


The SU Carburettor High Performance Manual (Speed Pro) (Speed Pro) (Speedpro Series)
The SU Carburettor High Performance Manual (Speed Pro) (Speed Pro) (Speedpro Series)
by Des Hammill
Edition: Paperback
Price: 19.99

3 of 5 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars disappointing, 19 Oct 2012
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
As someone with 50 yrs experience in modifying, designing and building engines, I thought this book might throw up a few tips - after all we can all learn something. Sadly, even for those who merely want to get the best out of their standard carburettor set-up, this book is a waste of time, to the extent I get the impression the author knows much less than he'd like readers to assume. In fact, I very much doubt he is the experienced engine tuner suggested at all. I also wonder who he might be - Des Hammill somehow doesn't sound right - an anagram perhaps?
Anyway, to the book's contents: there is strangely no comparison with other variable venturi carbs (such as Stromberg, or the Ford unit on their CVH engines) that one might expect - or even with the Amal which, despite not having a spindle / butterfly does have some similarities.
In essence, this book tells you how to modify SU needles should you wish to tamper with the dashpot spring. Curiously, given that the whole book revolves around altering needles to suit SU's with no (or little) spring or damper, the book makes no reference at all to early SU carburettors (brass piston) which had no spring or damping rod. This is, in my view, a serious omission. I also found the book extremely repetitive and, where alterations were suggested, the reader was then left to try it out for himself. No list of engines with specified modifications and the bhp they produced before and after as one might expect.
In conclusion, this book is no help to anyone with reasonable experience of tuning engines, whilst the information (such as it is) is not relevant to anyone simply wanting to get the best from their standard road car.
Save your money and buy Four Stroke Tuning by Graham Bell - who really knows what he's on about.
Comment Comment (1) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Dec 12, 2012 3:01 PM GMT


Four-stroke Performance Tuning: A Practical Guide
Four-stroke Performance Tuning: A Practical Guide
by A. Graham Bell
Edition: Hardcover

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars the best you can buy, 21 Sep 2012
I have owned an earlier print run of this book for years and can say, as someone who has been rebuilding, modifying, designing and building engines for over 40 years, that, like 'Machinery Handbook' (which caters for machinists) this book is equally complete. In other words, if it isn't in there, it doesn't exist. The author's command of engine design and, importantly, how all the various parts interact, is second to none. Whether you just need to know that you have the appropriate size valves in your engine - or whether you are contemplating making a new camshaft or crankshaft - it's all in there. The sections on camshaft timings and exhaust systems alone are worth many times the cost of the book. Pity more of those so-called 'engine tuners' (including some household names) don't buy this book.


Garmin nuvi 1340 Traffic 4.3" Sat Nav with UK and Western Europe Maps
Garmin nuvi 1340 Traffic 4.3" Sat Nav with UK and Western Europe Maps
Price: 125.73

2 of 5 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars very poor show, 12 Nov 2010
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Bought this item after reading reviews of most makes / models. Looks a great piece of kit, but unfortunately it's only an ornament as I can't even get it started - it won't accept more than one letter of 'city' so can get no further. The 'manual' supplied (in a dozen languages) is a joke - a couple of pages of 'quick start' - and if you need a full manual you have to download / print off over 60 pages on-line. For a manufacturer not to supply a proper manual is a disgrace. Most GPS's I'm familiar with have on-screen directions that are self-explanatory. Not this kit - unless you're a computer programmer I suggest you buy something else.
Comment Comment (1) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Jan 21, 2011 10:09 PM GMT


The Hitler Book: The Secret Report by His Two Closest Aides
The Hitler Book: The Secret Report by His Two Closest Aides
by Henrik Eberle
Edition: Paperback
Price: 12.99

9 of 22 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars disappointing, 1 Oct 2009
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I feel mean giving this the minimum, because clearly a lot of work went into producing the book.
However, I need to draw attention to the fact that this book presents itself as an historical work, when, in fact, it is a novel. As someone who has done a fair bit of research on Hitler, I was looking for finer detail. Unfortunately, I was terribly disappointed with this book, but I blame myself - I should have realised beforehand from the information source. It is well known that Stalin's men were embarrassed by Hitler's escape - yes, I'll come to that shortly - and that the Germans interrogated were only too willing to tell their interrogators whatever they wanted to hear. It should be no surprise, therefore, that the contents of this book bear little resemblance to the known facts. Besides, the idea that such detail could be recalled regarding who was where and precisely what they said is preposterous.
Indeed, the book warns us, on page xvii of the Foreword, that 'As a(n) historical document it must be used with caution'.
Never the less, I was somewhat irritated by the assertion, on page xx, that Trevor Roper' book "reached the correct conclusion that Hitler had shot himself in the bunker on April 30th...".
Actually, Hitler had escaped a few days before. There is no evidence, of any sort, to support the illusion created by the Germans that Hitler had committed suicide - but plenty to prove he escaped to Argentina, arriving by submarine two months later. Many of his top brass did likewise, and the submarines are still there.
Of course, after the trauma of WW2, people wanted closure - it would have been unsettling to think Hitler was still at large; hence the readiness of the Allies to agree with the German charade of a suicide. Stalin himself knew Hitler had escaped, and told Churchill so. Those interrogating German officials always asked 'where is Hitler? Did he go to Spain or Hamburg?' Why ask such questions if you are certain he died at the bunker?

On page x of the Foreword, it is suggested the Soviet authorities possessed the jawbones and dental work of both Hitler and Eva Braun. Rubbish. No trace of Eva Braun was ever found, and the jawbone is actually from a very poor 'double' of Hitler - one who was two inches shorter, had completely different ears and who couldn't recognise any of the people in the bunker (before he was drugged and then shot). The soviets, in keeping with the embarrassment mentioned earlier, also did a fair amount of 'creative' investigation. They also refused proper access to the bunker and garden to Allied investigators, so Roper's conclusions in his book are only at best a guess as to what happened.
Conclusion - it's a lightheated read, but if you're looking for facts, look elsewhere. There are so many parts of the text that contradict known evidence, this book cannot be regarded as an historical account. In fact, for those of us who have studied the subject, it is a diversion from our quest for more information.


Web Of Deceit: Britain's Real Foreign Policy: Britain's Real Role in the World
Web Of Deceit: Britain's Real Foreign Policy: Britain's Real Role in the World
by Mark Curtis
Edition: Paperback
Price: 6.99

24 of 26 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars be aware, 27 May 2009
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
I hope many will read this book, but sadly, too many people are selfish - as long as they're comfortable in their home, have a TV, nice car the neighbours can envy, etc. they don't care a damn about anything else. Unfortunately, when they wake up to what's really going on it will probably be too late - and they'll be the first to moan.
This book brings together many issues that collectively make one aware how we are manipulated by governmenmts. There are dozens of conspiracy theories out there - but this is not one of them. It's a factual analysis of the lies and corruption that, when it finally reaches its goal, will be known as the new world order - the enslavement of people by a handful of powerful people.
Full marks to Mark Curtis for this work. I implore as many as possible to read it.


Sandisk MP3 Player Sansa Clip 2Gb Red
Sandisk MP3 Player Sansa Clip 2Gb Red

2 of 7 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Rubbish, 30 April 2009
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
I wanted something a bit smaller than my portable CD player so I could listen to a few track whilst travelling. I couldn't see the point of splashing out on an Ipod when I didn't need all the features, but guess the old maxim applies - buy cheap and buy twice. I put one star because that's the minimum - I'd have put 0 were it possible.
I chose this unit on the back of the reviews. All I can say is there must be a lot of lucky people out there. When I looked more closely, I see this player is available elsewhere on this site where it consistently scores one *
Where do I start? If you want a tiny radio that almost works, this may be for you, but ...
It's very (too) small. You could fit a couple in a matchbox. The on / lock switch is too stiff for such a small machine and is therefore difficult to operate. If you play the 4 pre-recorded tunes on it, sound quality isn't bad, but I didn't buy it to listen to them, I wanted to listen to MY music. Sadly, that's not possible, because despite numerous attempts no way will my PC recognise the player, despite the player saying it's connected.
I've overcome some difficult installations in my time, but I can't override a code 10. Wish I hadn't wasted my time / ink printing off the manual. The 'packaging' consists of a blister pack you have to seriously vandalise to get at the player, so guess this will be going back to Amazon in a jiffy bag - or I might just save myself the hassle and throw it away.
Don't waste your money - get the real thing instead.
Comment Comment (1) | Permalink | Most recent comment: May 1, 2009 10:25 PM BST


Canon PowerShot A590 IS Digital Camera (8.0 MP, 4xOptical Zoom) 2.5" LCD
Canon PowerShot A590 IS Digital Camera (8.0 MP, 4xOptical Zoom) 2.5" LCD

7 of 47 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars average, 15 Dec 2008
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Have always had Fuji finepix digital cameras, and the last one I had, the A920 is magic - except it has no viewfinder. Having to frame a picture in a screen is not ideal at the best of times - impossible in strong sunlight, so I sought a reasonable alternative. Canon appears to be one of the few, if not the only, company who still supply digital with a viewfinder. Great. Not bad pictures either, 'though the camera is unnecessarily complicated when compared with the Fuji equivalent. However, I have to say, overall, I'm quite disappointed with the Canon A590. It's terribly plasticy, the bulge to accomodate the 2nd battery is a nuisance - they'd have been better lengthening the canera a few mm instead. But my biggest gripe is that I cannot load the CD supplied. It tells me my screen resolution is insufficient, and won't let me progress any further!!!!! None of my other cameras - or any other software for that matter, has this problem. This means I'm forced to put the card in a card reader to unload pictures. If it wasn't for the fact this camera is one of the very few with a viewfinder, frankly I'd throw it away.
Comment Comments (5) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Nov 22, 2010 9:26 AM GMT


End of Eden: The Comet That Changed Civilization
End of Eden: The Comet That Changed Civilization
by Graham Phillips
Edition: Paperback
Price: 10.99

4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars disappointing, 21 Jun 2008
Ever since reading my first von Daniken book years ago, I've been keen to read as much on this subject as possible. However, having just read 'Slave species of God' by Michael Tellinger (which I seriously recommend), The End of Eden was a huge disappointment.
It is probably the only book I seriously thought about throwing away half-way through.
The beginning is mediocre, with a great deal of fluff. The middle is full of 1st school information (eg. the pyramids were kings tombs) - which they are not - and consequently I found myself flipping pages over ten at a time. Only when one gets towards the last chapter is the theory of a comet dealt with - and even then there's a lack of any real analysis.
In fact, the author got so involved at one point discussing volcanic eruptions that I thought he'd abandoned the comet theory. There is a conflict between these two ideas, and it remains unresloved - as does the period of the comet - at one stage suggested to be 3,500 yrs, whilst stated at c. 70yrs a short while later.
The comet theory is adjusted to suit the situation, has no real data or evidence to support it, and the reader is left wondering what it was all about.
Plenty of speculation and supposition, but very little evidence.
Comment Comments (2) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Mar 14, 2012 7:23 PM GMT


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