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Anatole Pang (London, Britain)
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England's Thousand Best Houses
England's Thousand Best Houses
by Simon Jenkins
Edition: Hardcover

13 of 18 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Quite good, 12 Jan 2004
I think the book is good, but perhaps a little over-ambitious in its scope. Unfortunately, houses do not lend themselves to such a neat compendium in the way that churches did in his previous book. Nonetheless it is a useful reference for knowing more about some of the more hidden gems. Disagree over Oxbridge colleges, insofar as they are essentially secular residences - I think the book would probably be incomplete without them.


Oxford: A Guide to Recent Architecture (Heritage Edition)
Oxford: A Guide to Recent Architecture (Heritage Edition)
by Peter Howard
Edition: Paperback

1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Compact and Useful, 11 Jan 2003
This handy little guide is very useful for the amateur and connoisseur alike, but is quite specific in its role. It is interesting in extending its range beyond purely the academic structures of the city, the colleges and the like, to include such places as the Randolph Hotel, the Town Hall, etc. However it is not designed as a tourist guide and cannot be used as such due to its lack of directions. The book is ideal for people, for instance students or their parents, who know the city well and wish to check up more fully buildings which they are familiar with rather than newcomers. Otherwise excellent details and choice of sites both old and new. Even reviews the Oxford Ice Rink!


The Universities of Europe in the Middle Ages - 3 Volumes
The Universities of Europe in the Middle Ages - 3 Volumes
by Hastings Rashdall
Edition: Hardcover

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Comprehensive survey of the medieval university system, 7 Dec 2002
Rashdall's history of the development of medieval universities in Europe is an interesting one. Although the three volumes focus primarily on tracing individual institutions - Bologna and Paris in the first, Oxford and Cambridge in the third - it is also useful as a general survey on how the status of studium generale came about and in what diverse ways it manifested itself, from Italy to Bohemia to Scotland. In many ways these books will only be useful to the serious academic, but it will also hold an appeal to those who are interested in the historical background to modern foundations. From a personal point of view this is particularly true of the Oxbridge volume, where the earliest colleges, some of which are no longer extant, are dutifully recorded and in which there are many surprising facts. It is no tourist guide; but an esoteric read nonetheless.


The Good Schools Guide
The Good Schools Guide
by Amanda Atha
Edition: Paperback

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Very Good Schools Guide, 29 July 2002
This review is from: The Good Schools Guide (Paperback)
This is concise and offers enough interesting material to simply browse through, as well as giving parents all the information they need to make informed decisions. What I like about this book is the fact that it reviews simply the top schools, regardless of classification. This means that top state schools, particularly grammar schools and the like, as in the book as well, giving parents food for thought regarding the entire spectrum of education and not restricting their vision to the Head Masters Conference (HMC). An excellent resource.


The Old European Order 1660-1800 (Short Oxford History of the Modern World)
The Old European Order 1660-1800 (Short Oxford History of the Modern World)
by William Doyle
Edition: Paperback
Price: 36.00

3 of 6 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Slightly disappointing, 23 July 2001
This book comes as something of a disappointment in the Oxford History of the Modern World series, when compared to Bonney's European Dynastic States or Jones' The Limits of Liberty, and also compared to Doyle's own Oxford History of the French Revolution. While covering most of the necessary ground, the writing, this offering lacks some of the lucid narrative necessary in general surveys in favour of an increased emphasis on analysis. Without doubt of great value to the student, this will probably be easy to digest for those with a more leisured interest in history reading.


The European Dynastic States 1494-1660 (Short Oxford History of the Modern World)
The European Dynastic States 1494-1660 (Short Oxford History of the Modern World)
by Richard Bonney
Edition: Paperback
Price: 37.00

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The best historical survey of the era, 23 July 2001
Bonney's book is without doubt the best general survey of early modern Europe available. Not only is the narrative thoroughly engaging, it also covers every aspect of the period required as a student: religion, politics, economics and culture. It is easy to navigate and broken down to make good sense if picking your way through. A superb history book both for the academic and the leisure reader.


The Limits of Liberty: American History 1607-1992 (Short Oxford History of the Modern World)
The Limits of Liberty: American History 1607-1992 (Short Oxford History of the Modern World)
by Maldwyn A. Jones
Edition: Paperback
Price: 25.20

5 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An excellent part of a great series, 23 July 2001
I stumbled across this book only after having delighted in Bonney's European Dynastic States. Jones' narrative and analysis of the general trends in American history in this publication is concise yet informative, covering things in just enough detail to get a feel for each period, and broad enough to allow easy comprehension of the story as a whole. I strongly recommend this book as a survey both as an introduction for those with academic intentions as well as human interest reading. Another great book in the Oxford History of the Modern World series.


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