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Lord P (England.)

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Osail Animal Repeller--2 x Solar Cat Repeller Garden Chaser Scarer Ultra Sonic Deterrent Repellent Fox UK DelCvery (Green 2)
Osail Animal Repeller--2 x Solar Cat Repeller Garden Chaser Scarer Ultra Sonic Deterrent Repellent Fox UK DelCvery (Green 2)

1.0 out of 5 stars What a Scandal!, 18 Oct. 2015
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
When I received this item on at the beginning of August I thought I'd have to wait a while for them to charge in the daylight.
Almost three months later I am still waiting. Neither of them has ever worked. Now I'm informed it is too late to get a refund
despite the so-called three year warranty. A total waste of money. Do not buy this item. They were never fit for purpose.


Why Science Is Wrong...About Almost  Everything
Why Science Is Wrong...About Almost Everything
by Alex Tsakiris
Edition: Paperback
Price: £10.00

0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars I was truly disappointed with this book, 14 Sept. 2015
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I was truly disappointed with this book, even though I agree with the author's desire for consciousness to be an integral part our understanding of reality. As a radio producer I was taught that interview questions should be short and to the point. This self-indulgent author appeared keen to hear his own voice, explaining perhaps some of the incoherent rambling as he pursued his agenda. The dialogues in this book offer nothing original regarding the shortcomings of materialist science and trying bombastically to corner the interviewees was only one of this book's unattractive traits. Another lesson I had as a producer was that transcriptions of radio interviews do not work as well for readers as they do for listeners. Here is the proof, set down in this book. Valuable insights were in short supply. The most disappointing chapter concerned Darwin, which did not even begin to grapple with the inadequacies of Darwin's theory, only with the possibility of plagiarism, and I was shocked that a managing editor of BBC tv documentaries was not deeply involved in the content of a programme for which he himself took credit.


MAXSTRENGTH ® Free Standing Boxing Speed Punch Ball
MAXSTRENGTH ® Free Standing Boxing Speed Punch Ball

0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars but it turned out to be a brilliant move. It may be solid but it is ..., 12 Aug. 2015
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
I bought this to work off anger with a conveyancer who was doing a lousy job processing my house sale! I was diffident about buying a model with a solid punch ball instead of an inflatable one, but it turned out to be a brilliant move. It may be solid but it is not hard and it should be very durable. This really is a very sturdy piece of kit; good quality. The base I filled with water, which is very easy to do, and when full it weighs about 50 lbs. It does not shift however hard you punch the ball. I bought the model with gloves included for only £3 more. They are not the best, but are completely serviceable and should last a long time. Go for it!


Kafka On The Shore (Vintage Magic)
Kafka On The Shore (Vintage Magic)
by Haruki Murakami
Edition: Mass Market Paperback
Price: £5.84

5.0 out of 5 stars Five stars, 13 July 2015
A brilliant book, one of the best I've read in years. Look at other reviews for a narrative description. In addition to being enjoyable, I would just say it is witty, intriguing, surreal, intelligent, fantastical, philosophical, and yes at times fun, with imaginative use of language. Can't get much better than that. I read Murakami's 1Q84 first, which is very long and also enjoyable. But this is better. I'll be reading more of this author.


Gallant Hand Exerciser Gripper Plastic Blue
Gallant Hand Exerciser Gripper Plastic Blue
Offered by GallantSports

4.0 out of 5 stars Four Stars, 17 May 2015
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Cheap and cheerful. Does the job.


La Cafetiere Thermique Insulated 8-Cup Cafetiere French Press Coffee Maker
La Cafetiere Thermique Insulated 8-Cup Cafetiere French Press Coffee Maker
Price: £32.66

5.0 out of 5 stars An excellent piece of kit, 17 May 2015
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
An excellent piece of kit. Good quality, only the brazing of the handle to the body was a different colour from the rest, but this is only a small point and hardly noticeable.


Atlas Shrugged (Penguin Modern Classics)
Atlas Shrugged (Penguin Modern Classics)
by Ayn Rand
Edition: Paperback
Price: £7.14

2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Curate's Egg, 17 May 2015
One of Ayn Rand’s themes in this novel is the importance of ‘reality’, yet her own version of “the United States’ is not much like the real one. She acknowledges no party system, Democrats or Republicans, and none of the political in-fighting that typifies the real America. Against this backdrop, she approves her heroes’ every ambition. They’re an elite clique of privileged, wealthy, driven individuals - the country’s biggest industrialists and business leaders. Their driven self-interest is the only creativity that Rand sees as having value.

Pitted against her heroes are the mindless gangsters who run the country for their own material benefit. They exploit the goodwill and effort of her heroes, and make laws for their own benefit without need for a political process. These ‘looters’ ultimately bring the nation to destruction.

Since in real life Ayn Rand escaped as a young woman from Soviet Communism, many of whose party members could reasonably be typified as gangsters with political control, its not surprising that her version of the United States is run by similar characters. But what she has developed is a philosophy that goes as far in the opposite direction as possible, and supports unfettered right-wing Capitalism. It speaks to swathes of people supporting the fundamentalist factions of the Repubulican party, and in doing so Ayn Rand has surely established for herself an eternal place in the hearts of many Americans. Here is literature that will last; regardless of its quality. And for me at least, the quality is definitely ‘curate’s egg’.

Since this novel is longer than War and Peace, it is challenging on the grounds of length alone. What it shares with Tolstoy is frequent polemical arguments that take many pages and hold up the narrative itself. In Rand’s case its her right wing agenda; with Tolstoy it was whether history throws up the appropriate man for the moment, or whether leaders, such as Napleon, are themselves the creators of history.

While I lack sympathy with the egoism of Ayn Rand’s objectivist philosophy, at times her narrative is gripping. I particularly liked the chapter where Dagny Taggart and Hank Rearden (heroes) ride the inaugural John Galt Railway Line - built against all odds with the revolutionary new Rearden metal. Also the chapter where the dastardly James Taggart has a discussion with his teenage wife Cheryl, immediately before she runs away to commit suicide. Less successful was the ‘X project’ episode which edged into fantasy. And since we had already endured many pagees of polemics along the way, I could not bring myself to read the full length of the John Galt radio speech - a 64 page slab of polemic towards the end of the book that spelt out Rand’s philosophy yet again. What an endless diatribe. Finally I found the conclusion disappointing, since it offered a glib Hollywood-style action movie ending. This brought the book to a sputtering end, and was only partially redeemed by the final spiritual plight of Eddie Willers, a loyal railroad employee stuck in the Arizona desert on his beloved Comet transcontinental express that was going nowhere. Not least, I found the notion that Rand's ambitious heroes could live happily-ever-after in a secret valley living humble, isolated lives, was just preposterous; although the chapter introducing this place had its descriptive charms. Having written this review I’m thinking 3 stars, but I’ll give it 4 stars for the sheer ambition of its author’s vision.


Why Does the World Exist?: One Man's Quest for the Big Answer
Why Does the World Exist?: One Man's Quest for the Big Answer
by Jim Holt
Edition: Paperback
Price: £8.99

1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A Useful Trot Round The Course!, 8 July 2014
Jim Holt has written an engaging tome. He is marvellously well informed about a huge array of other people's work, and I am impressed by that. However this book caused me to develop a complete disdain for philososphers! Who wants castles-in-the-air based on mere speculation, with conclusions based on non-sequitur inventions? Was the universe really created by the 'ethical need for goodness', as one contributor claims ? !! Is there really an infinite number of universes ? Is the statement 'Nothing noths' of any use to anyone? Where is the empiricism? Surely, there's a point at which we should admit `We Don't Know' and leave it at that. I was heartened to find in this book that I am not alone in that view, but it was a tiny minority perspective. So I wondered whether philosophers even care about the lack of evidence they bring to their subject. I don't believe reasoning alone is enough, even if they do. They may be having a good time playing with their brains, which is OK. . . but should we care?

So this was an illuminating book for me. I've read a few others on the origin of the universe/life etc, including "In the beginning there was Information' by Dr Werner Gitt; `Biocentrism' by Dr Robert Lanza, and `The Origin of Life' by Paul Davies. I'd say that Jim Holt's book is the clearest and best of the bunch, though it is getting pretty heavy by half way through and seems to deteriorate towards the end. However, if you're interested in ontology, this is the book to get. As my former boss used to say of my documentary journalism (on a good day!), `Its a useful trot round the course'. Not that you'll be much the wiser when you've read it, as Holt himself acknowledges in the final quotation in his book - Ambrose Bierce's definition of philosophy - 'A route of many roads leading from nowhere to nothing'. What is missing from this book is emphasis that the universe consists not just of matter and energy, but also information. This is hugely important since it raises the question - where did the information come from? In the case of living things, the information is so complex and ingenious - for the workings of even a single cell, for example - that it appears to be no mere random accident. The odds against are too mind-bogglingly huge. Even Einstein saw a superior mind at work in how the universe is manifest. (I am deliberately not invoking a God here). Also, there is no discussion of the suggestion that the universe could be considered a hologram. Personally, I've concluded - based on empirical evidence not featured in this book - that our consciousness survives the death of the body. There have been many evidential communications from 'the other side' monitored and confirmed by eminent scientists. Jim Holt's assumption appears to be that this is not so, that death equals a void. However, if there is a spiritual dimension, virtually nothing the philosophers in this book have dreamt up is correct. Reality would be altogether bigger than they have imagined. So shouldn't this figure in their philosophising and influence their views on the universe and its origin?


Evecase® Ultraportable Neoprene Pocket Handle Carrying Sleeve Case Bag for Samsung Chromebook (Wi-Fi, 11.6-Inch) - Black
Evecase® Ultraportable Neoprene Pocket Handle Carrying Sleeve Case Bag for Samsung Chromebook (Wi-Fi, 11.6-Inch) - Black
Offered by BlueMall_GB

5.0 out of 5 stars Does the job, 8 Jun. 2014
I keep my Acer C720 in this case. It cost £6.99 from Amazon at the time. There's a useful zipped pocket if you carry a mouse, as I do. I cannot fault the quality which has insulation to protect the chromebook from hard knocks. Good value.


The Afterlife Interviews: Volume I
The Afterlife Interviews: Volume I
by Jeffrey A. Marks
Edition: Paperback
Price: £16.00

3.0 out of 5 stars O.K. but that's all., 15 April 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
To anyone who has already read 'Life in the World Unseen' by Anthony Borgia (an exciting read!), or books describing the afterlife by the renowned medium Lisa Williams, this volume offers little that is new. I liked the Introduction in which the author explained his methodology, which seemed logical, reasonable, transparent and an intelligent approach to the task he had given himself - getting spirits linked to sitters to describe what the afterlife is like. But unfortunately the book ended up not only revealing virtually nothing that has not been described elsewhere, but it is also really repetitive. His 14 communicators were often saying similar things using only slightly different words. So I concluded that despite the methodology being admirable, the results themselves could have been offered in a much more economical way, and thus the two volumes presented as a single volume. Indeed so repetitive was this book that I struggled to finish the final chapter. I do not feel impelled to buy volume 2. For readers new to this subject, I think Borgia's book is preferable and covers much much more.


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