Shop now Shop now  Up to 70% Off Fashion  Shop all Amazon Fashion Cloud Drive Photos Shop now Learn More Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop Fire Shop Kindle Shop now Shop now
Profile for N. Bowring > Reviews

Personal Profile

Content by N. Bowring
Top Reviewer Ranking: 175,036
Helpful Votes: 104

Learn more about Your Profile.

Reviews Written by
N. Bowring "Say something about yourself!" (Sussex)
(REAL NAME)   

Show:  
Page: 1 | 2
pixel
Up Against the Night
Up Against the Night
by Justin Cartwright
Edition: Hardcover
Price: £15.90

3.0 out of 5 stars A promising start did not live up to expectations for this reader, 27 Feb. 2016
This review is from: Up Against the Night (Hardcover)
This review is for hardback version.

The book begins with a promising storyline. A descendent of Piet Retief (who, with his entire camp was murdered by Dingane King of the Zulus in 1838) Frank McAllister is a wealthy South African who has been living in England for the past 30 years. He plans a trip to his house in Cape Town with his lover, her young son and his daughter, who is a recovering drug addict, flying back from rehab in California.

Lurking in the background is Frank’s unhinged cousin Jaco, who achieves mild fame after fending off a shark on a “selfie” video which is later shown on U-tube. He becomes disillusioned with scientology after joining the cult in America, and his dreams of being propelled to Mars by his own mental forces aren’t materialised. He appeals to his cousin to bail him out when the group he has joined demand repayment of debts incurred.

A deranged, loose cannon, Jaco is the most rounded character in the book. His speech and inner dialogue are authentically drawn and provide the tension in this otherwise unexciting story which could have been improved by wise editing, despite the short length of the book.

Cartwright’s vivid descriptions of Cape Town bring smells, colours and atmosphere alive, but for me, his short, clipped sentences disrupt the flow of his narrative. It is almost like reading the book while still in note form. The end was unexpected and reflects the sad state of that beautiful country.


Jason Natural Products Hair Thickening Conditioner 235 ml
Jason Natural Products Hair Thickening Conditioner 235 ml
Offered by Blue Herbs
Price: £9.44

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars 5* s if I could get at it!, 25 July 2015
Great product but impossible (for me anyhow) to squeeze out of the hard bottle. I had to ask my husband to decant it into a jar for me. Please Jason....consider using a more user-friendly container!


Acrylics Unleashed
Acrylics Unleashed
by Glyn Macey
Edition: Paperback
Price: £13.48

6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Not for this beginner, 3 April 2015
This review is from: Acrylics Unleashed (Paperback)
As I am an absolute beginner (and not a very good one at that) I found the "how to" section way beyond my level of competence. From the illustrations there is no doubt that Glyn Macey is a very talented artist. This book is perfect for the accomplished painter as he demonstrates innovative and challenging methods that will help produce high class work. If I was at that level of skill I would give the book 5 stars, but as I am judging it from a lower point of view, I have to rate it according to how it failed to help me.
Comment Comment (1) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Apr 13, 2015 10:19 PM BST


The World We Made: Alex McKay's Story from 2050
The World We Made: Alex McKay's Story from 2050
by Jonathon Porritt
Edition: Paperback
Price: £24.95

23 of 23 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Hopeful Future.....if, 28 Oct. 2013
We blank out a dismal vision of our future due to climate change because it is too depressing to contemplate. No government has had the courage to tackle the problem and move towards a more sustainable world for fear of losing votes, so why should we take the initiative?
The World We Made foresees a model society in 2050 where (after several worldwide catastrophes) we have halted the pessimistic prophecies of scientists through innovative advances in our living practices. It is told through the eyes of a teacher living in 2050 and recounts all of the main technological, cultural and political breakthroughs which have led to a sustainable society.
It is the first hopeful prediction for the future that I have read and it is tremendously inspiring. However, the book comes with a big but: it is only ever going to happen if businesses, governments and people like you and me make it happen. In my opinion, The World We Made should be a set book for 6th form students, forced reading for all politicians and thoroughly recommended for everyone else.


Death of a Man
Death of a Man
Price: £3.48

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Moving story of love and courage, 3 Mar. 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Death of a Man (Kindle Edition)
This is a story of loss and endurance, frustration and humility, but much more than that, it is a story of enduring love and devotion and told with disarming honesty.
I cried a lot while reading this beautifully written book. Sometimes because of the sheer sadness of the narrative, but mostly because of the heroism and courage of Daniel and Vin and their three loving children.
I agree with another reviewer who said that this book should be published in paperback, and therefore more readily available to a greater section of the public. It is a must-read for anyone who has or has had any serious illness or disability in their family. In fact, it is a must-read for everyone.


Cocktail Hour Under the Tree of Forgetfulness
Cocktail Hour Under the Tree of Forgetfulness
by Alexandra Fuller
Edition: Hardcover

38 of 38 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Beautifully told story of great courage and love, 17 Dec. 2011
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Don't Let's Go to the Dogs Tonight is one of my favourite books. Told from the innocent perspective of a child, it is funny and sad and above all, honest.
I approached Cocktail Hour Under the Tree of Forgetfulness with eager anticipation and have to admit, found the first few chapters disappointing. I felt that Alexandra Fuller had compromised the vivid characterization of her eccentric wonderful mother, in order to please her and make amends for what the family called the "awful book". But I was wrong.
Tree of Forgetfulness is more serious than Dogs because it is related by the grown up Alexandra, or Bobo as her family call her, so lacks the naivety of the child. From this adult, knowing viewpoint, it is somehow all the more heartbreaking. The story of her parents' courage, resilience and humour in the face of insuperable tragedy in the harsh, punishing Continent of Africa - Kenya during the Mau Mau, Rhodesia (Zimbabwe) during the war of independence, is told with the generosity and warmth of a devoted and loving daughter.
"Nicola Fuller of Central Africa" always wanted a writer in the family to recount her "fabulously romantic life". Her life may not have turned out as romantically as she had hoped, but it was full of adventure and love and she couldn't have wished for a better "scribe" than her own daughter to relate it.


My Travels With Wheely
My Travels With Wheely
by Nicky Dalladay
Edition: Paperback
Price: £13.06

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Funny, gutsy and deeply moving, 28 Feb. 2011
This review is from: My Travels With Wheely (Paperback)
My Travels With Wheely is a story about two people who are off to see the world in three months. But that is only a tiny part of the story. One of them has multiple sclerosis and the other is her adoring husband, who would travel to the moon and parachute back, if it was to make her happy. It is about two people with enough courage for an army of soldiers.
Nicky Dalladay's lively accounts of sights, sounds and smells bring people and places to life so that the reader gets a vivid peek into the other side of the world.
She has a keen sense of humour and this book is often very funny. Once or twice her guard drops and we glimpse a world of utter frustration at being disabled in an able-bodied world, though not for one moment does she ever sink into self-pity.
Mostly, she is an enthusiastic traveller who marvels with pure joy at everything about her. She is a perceptive observer of her fellow human being but with her innate charm, somehow manages to turn many a sour-faced harridan into an obliging and helpful tour guide or hotel receptionist.
This book is filled with fascinating snippets about the various people David and Nicky met on their travels. The kindness of total strangers in Vietnam, where there was always a ready-and waiting group of enthusiastic locals ready to help. On one occasion four of them carried Nicky and Wheely up a flight of stairs and on another, it was a mountain! Another was the quad bike owner in New Zealand whose mission it was to make sure she did not lose out on the fun.
They also encountered hostility where disabled passengers were clearly not welcome but Nicky glides over these downsides with customary humour. Whilst able-bodied travellers take a hotel bedroom with en-suite bath/shower room for granted, Nicky enters each new room with fear and trepidation. It seems that far too many countries and hotels do not cater for disabled customers and too frequently they found themselves "fighting" for their rights for the simple "luxury" of a walk-in shower with no steps or ledges to scale.
Wheely finally gives up the ghost after being man-handled once too often by airline staff and Nicky feels like she has lost her best friend. But her gloom is short-lived as the ever-efficient and thoughtful David finds a second-hand replacement.
I strongly recommend this book. If I could, I would make it compulsory reading for all in the tourist industry. Not only is it funny but it is deeply moving and I am in total awe of these two gutsy heroes.


Liar
Liar
by Kwezi Fairfoot
Edition: Paperback
Price: £16.95

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Haunting tale of maternal malice, 31 Oct. 2009
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Liar (Paperback)
Liar stayed with me long after I have finished reading it. It raises many issues that leave the reader feeling haunted by the experience.
Is there such a thing as a truly evil person or are we made what we are by circumstance? Hillary, the Liar, is an enigmatic character who lures friends and family alike into her web of lies and half lies. She schemes and plots her way through life like a snake charmer, spinning yarns with such conviction that all who come under her spell are taken in. For reasons which become clearer as the story unfolds, she chooses her daughter Cordelia, the protagonist who narrates the story, as her chief "whipping-boy". Although Cordelia's "misdemeanours" are total fabrications, Hillary's audience are duped into believing the child is wicked and even capable of attempting the murder of her beloved baby sister.
Not only as a child, but also when she matures into adulthood, Cordelia is never able to rid herself of the curse of her mother who seems to wield super-natural powers over her daughter's final destruction.
Liar is a deeply disturbing tale of malice and the power of hatred. The story is compellingly told and I found it compulsive reading; once started I could not put the book down until I had finished it. I would have thought that it would appeal to Stephen King fans, with its ability to shock and intrigue at the same time. Kwezi Fairfoot is adept at creating an atmosphere of fear and repulsion. She is also a master at finely tuning her characters so that you either love them or detest them.
If the book had been properly edited, I would have felt able to give it a higher star rating.
Comment Comment (1) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Apr 27, 2010 5:35 PM BST


Committed: The Adventures of PETA's Rebel Campaigner: A Rabble-rouser's Memoir
Committed: The Adventures of PETA's Rebel Campaigner: A Rabble-rouser's Memoir
by Dan Mathews
Edition: Paperback
Price: £8.99

0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Not for the feint-hearted but very funny, 28 Jun. 2009
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This is not a book for the feint-hearted. For those of you who do not like to face the grim realities of animal suffering on behalf of us humans - i.e. fur farming, vivisection, factory farming etc., this book is not for you. For the others of you who do not choose to avert your eyes to the misery and torment of these creatures, I strongly recommend this book. It not only illuminates the horrors of animal suffering but it is also an adventure story about an animal activist who is not afraid of being imprisoned for his beliefs. It brings to mind the self-sacrificial deeds of the slavery abolitionists, suffragists and anti-apartheid lobby who fought against huge injustices which were thought of at the time (as animal rights are today) as the actions of cranks and nutters. It is also very funny and an excellent read.


One Can Make a Difference: How Simple Actions Can Change the World
One Can Make a Difference: How Simple Actions Can Change the World
by Ingrid E Newkirk
Edition: Hardcover

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great to dip into, 20 May 2009
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This is a selection of anecdotes compiled by the founder of PETA (People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals) Ingrid Newkirk. Among its contributors are the Dalai Lama, Stella McCartney, Brigitte Bardot, to name a few from a very impressive list. The book can be read cover to cover or dipped into for one story at a time. Paul McCartney's anecdote about his little girl Beatrice, dancing to one of his new songs, is one of the most heart warming.


Page: 1 | 2