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M Hill (Kent, England)

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The Sims 3: World Adventures - Expansion Pack (PC/Mac DVD)
The Sims 3: World Adventures - Expansion Pack (PC/Mac DVD)
Price: £12.99

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Sent non-UK region package. Not happy., 10 Sep 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Daughter ordered this and found it was the wrong region. There is no note of this in the product description and Amazon should amend or remove this listing. Appalling.
Comment Comment (1) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Jan 16, 2014 4:58 PM GMT


It Was This Or Football - First Half
It Was This Or Football - First Half
Offered by Direct Entertainment UK
Price: £5.29

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars As an old mod, I was very pleased ..., 31 July 2009
I'm not really kid british, more like mutha british, having been around for the previous, early 80s wave of ska & skank. I have had KidBritish on my radar for a couple years and have been waiting ... and waiting... for this album to come out. The production is great and lyrically I was very, very positively surprised. Loving the tracks Cosmopolitan (reminds me of UB40) and Reactions. The bonus track is also quite clever - but I won't spoil it for you. And Dadless? As a hardcore Madness fan, I am so pleased with where KB has taken it. Well done. I'm playing it for everyone who'll stand still long enough to listen and pushing it to my all old mates in the US. Missing Lost in London, though. Is it still to come? Will I have to wait as long for the second half?
Comment Comment (1) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Aug 1, 2009 3:46 PM BST


Learning Styles
Learning Styles
by Marlene Lefever
Edition: Paperback

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Outstanding, inspirational and practical information, 12 Oct 2004
This review is from: Learning Styles (Paperback)
As a home educator (and voluntary Sunday School teacher) I have found this book to be absolutely the best resource on how children learn that I have come across yet.
The profiles of the different learning styles are easy to understand and presented in a fluid, flexible way so that you don't feel that children have to be pushed into a box in order to fit with some theory. Instead it has given me the tools to reach different children effectively no matter what learning style they possess. The response from the children is immediate and hugely apparent.
With my own children, I can tap into their learning styles to get them to engage enthusiastically in their lessons even when they are feeling ill or just unmotivated. One day my daughter was feeling tired and very grumpy, but I needed to get the math lesson done. So I just honed in on her favourite way to learn - something practical, highly visual with a pattern to play with; we learnt combination fractions while playing with colourful tesselated shapes. As soon as I said, 'Lets play with the shapes,' she lept up shouting, 'Yeah! Yeah!' With my younger daughter, the book has helped me understand that I never understood how she learned before simply because her learning style (relationship-dependent) is almost directly opposed to mine (practical/creative). My teaching style with her has completely changed now, meaning that teaching time is shorter, more efficient and with better results.
LeFever's book is geared to teaching in a church environment, but the information is useful - and effective - in ANY environment. Get their learning style correct, deliver to their wavelength, and just watch the children blossom!


Postmodern Culture and Youth Discipleship: Commitment or Looking Cool? (Pastoral)
Postmodern Culture and Youth Discipleship: Commitment or Looking Cool? (Pastoral)
by Graham Cray
Edition: Paperback

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An eye-opening guide to how young people see the world ..., 10 July 2003
I've picked up plenty of guides on teens and 'post modern' culture (whatever that means) but this is the first to reveal in a meaningful way how our consumer culture shapes young people's view of themselves and their place (or lack thereof) in the world. Extraordinarily helpful. It is currently doing the rounds of my social worker friends - I can't wait until I get my copy back!


An African in Greenland (New York Review Books Classics)
An African in Greenland (New York Review Books Classics)
by Tété-Michel Kpomassie
Edition: Paperback
Price: £8.99

16 of 16 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A delightfully funny and exotic travel book, 15 Jan 2003
The title says it all. In a market full of travel books about American/English travellers going to Europe, An African in Greenland turns the format on its head for a Western audience. Tete-Michel escapes being inducted into a snake cult by following his boyhood dream of living with the Eskimoes.
The reality of life in Greenland is not so glamourous, with meals of raw, bloody blubber in the middle of winter butchered only feet from the communal piss bucket in the front room and numerous drunken fights. But Kpomassie finds himself falling in love with this remote culture nontheless.
A wonderful adventure.


The Rise of Christianity
The Rise of Christianity
by Rodney Stark
Edition: Paperback
Price: £9.89

18 of 22 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars An eye-opener, 17 Sep 2002
This book is so interesting I started to read it again as soon as I had finished it the first time.
Stark paints a vivid picture of the life and times of ordinary Jews, Greeks and Romans in the years following the Crucifixion. His arguments as to how the early Church acheived such impressive and resiliant growth are compelling and they give some insight into how the modern Church might recapture some of this vitality.
Stark is a sociologist straying into historical analysis, and there are some accompanying flaws as a result of this adventure. For example, his description of Antioch as a crowded, chaotic and filthy place to live could equally describe nearly any city up until the modern era. Indeed, Stark himself draws parallels between ancient Antioch and modern Bombay. If Christainity alone (or the related religions of Islam, Judiasm and Mormonism) could address the needs of the urban downtrodden then Hinduism and Buddhism would not have the stronghold in India that they currently possess. The fact that he has to impress his readers that whole families lived in single rooms with their livestock reveals his American (multi-room, livestock-free) upbringing - or that of the undergraduates he has to teach.
However, this is a minor flaw in an otherwise fascinating, easy to read book.


Does Your Child Have a Hidden Disability?
Does Your Child Have a Hidden Disability?
by Jill Curtis
Edition: Paperback

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great for learning how to cope ..., 17 Sep 2002
Hidden Disability is excellent for parents trying to figure out how to cope with a child that is 'different'. Accessible, quick to read, with a good index of UK support resources.


Honeymoon in Purdah: An Iranian Journey
Honeymoon in Purdah: An Iranian Journey
by Alison Wearing
Edition: Paperback

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars One of the best books I've read in months ..., 8 April 2002
This has been fascinating to read in light of all the negative propaganda we in the UK have been hearing about Islam. Honeymoon in Purdah is lovely because Wearing lets the people she meets on her journey speak for themselves about their lives and beliefs. Wearing's editorial comments about her own experience is almost secondary - a nice change from most travel books.
The book transitions nicely from serious to hilarious and I cannot tell you how many times I've awakened my poor husband because I had to stay up that extra hour or two to find what happens next, only to burst out into uncontrolled laughter in the wee hours of the night.
This is a book I would buy for my friends. Superb.


Parenting by Heart
Parenting by Heart
by Pinky McKay
Edition: Paperback

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Tells you how to parent instinctively - not perfectly, 9 Jan 2002
This review is from: Parenting by Heart (Paperback)
Parenting By Heart is a funny, touching and realistic look at parenting. Pinky discusses how not to be cowed by expert opinion or questionable survey results. She draws off the experiences of numerous women of how they overcame problems with their children by responding from the heart, and by doing what they felt was right rather than what they were told was right.
Pinky gives mothers the courage to go against the grain of public opinion in finding the best way to parent their own, very unique children.


Misconceptions: Truth, Lies and the Unexpected on the Journey to Motherhood
Misconceptions: Truth, Lies and the Unexpected on the Journey to Motherhood
by Naomi Wolf
Edition: Paperback

8 of 11 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Valuable for mums-to-be and future historians ..., 23 Oct 2001
... but bordering on infuriating for mothers who've already been there.
Wolfe tells the emotional story of her own pregnancy in such agonising detail it does feel at times as though she is the only woman who has ever been pregnant and found it less then absolutely brilliant.
Interestingly, her experience of being a mother (as opposed to a mother-to-be) fades to the background in the later part of the book and Wolfe gives other women a chance to complain.
While this sounds negative, she provides very valuable food for thought (not necessarily gospel truth, mind) for pregnant women about to be inducted into the Mother Club for the first time. Misconceptions will also be an important book for future historians and sociologists who will hopefully be shocked at how little mothers - and indeed children - were valued at the turn of the millennium.
For mothers who don't have a hobby (or profession) in gender studies, Misconceptions will make mildly irritating reading. There isn't anything in here that mothers don't already know and Wolfe doesn't provide very many practical solutions. Her willingness to point out the faults of Western culture is not helped by her peculiar eagerness to believe, and without much evidence, that less-industrialised cultures are much better places for mothers.


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