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Jukka Kontula (Oulu, Finland)
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Orbiting the Giant Hairball: A Corporate Fool's Guide to Surviving with Grace
Orbiting the Giant Hairball: A Corporate Fool's Guide to Surviving with Grace
by Gordon MacKenzie
Edition: Hardcover
Price: £14.94

5.0 out of 5 stars Magnificent book on corporate creativity, 4 Jan. 2010
This is a great book about organizational creativity. Gordon MacKenzie goes through the principles of creativity through his own experiences in the corporate world. The book is timely although it has been written almost 10 years ago and comes from experiences even earlier than that.

It is not your traditional management book with easy to apply how-to guides. In fact it could be said that this is a leadership book that requires a bit of chewing. If you are a traditional (middle) manager, some of the stuff might seem odd and hard to agree. However, MacKenzie reflects his thoughts so vividly that you simply cannot avoid agreeing with him.

Also a must read for all business school students!


The Entrepreneurship Research Challenge
The Entrepreneurship Research Challenge
by Per Davidsson
Edition: Paperback
Price: £25.00

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Only a collection of previously published articles, 5 Oct. 2009
The book is only a collection of previously published articles with little or non introduction to them added. If you can get these articles via other channels there is little value in buying this book. If you can't, then the book could be worth buying.

Big disappointment for me. I should have made a more thorough due diligence before buying this.


Who's Your City?: How the Creative Economy Is Making Where You Live the Most Important Decision of Your Life: How the Creative Economy Is Making Where to Live the Most Important Decision of Your Life
Who's Your City?: How the Creative Economy Is Making Where You Live the Most Important Decision of Your Life: How the Creative Economy Is Making Where to Live the Most Important Decision of Your Life
by Richard Florida
Edition: Hardcover

8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Important message but a bit too detailed and US focused, 19 Jan. 2009
Florida continues his creative class discussion in Who's your city. He makes a good point about how the place where we live has dramatic effect in what we can achieve both in personal and in work life. The book is well written and convincing.

For the first half he writes in pretty universal manner focusing in the relationship between creativity and regions. His main message is that the world is not becoming flat but instead spikier. Regions are specializing and benefiting from physical proximity of talented individuals. This he covers in part at an international level.

The latter half of the book is devoted to his studies and at this point he goes too much into detail. He explains in detail which cities rank as the best places to live for young single professionals, young couples, parents with kids and empty nesters. From an European perspective this is too much details, too little synthesis. Also at this point he focuses only on US regions.

Important topic and a well written book but it could have been focused differently.


Rules For Revolutionaries: The Capitalist Manifesto for Creating and Marketing New Products and Services
Rules For Revolutionaries: The Capitalist Manifesto for Creating and Marketing New Products and Services
by Guy Kawasaki
Edition: Paperback
Price: £9.99

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Get your innovation engine started, 24 Sept. 2006
In the book, Guy Kawasaki gives something to think about for every manager. The book is filled with examples of how companies have managed to create revolutionary businesses. However it lacks on scientific research about innovation which I could have used. The book is good for those taking their first steps into the world of innovations.

The book is divided into three parts: Create Like a God, Command Like a King and Work Like a Slave. I found the Create Like a God -part to be the most useful. In this part the author introduces ways to create revolutionary environment in the workplace and ways to think about your business in a revolutionary way. This focuses more on the creating ideas side.

The middle part focuses on ways to refine the revolutionary ideas. It gives lots of tips on how to involve your users in the innovation process and how to avoid typical mistakes associated with innovative businesses. The last part focuses on advice on how to deliver the product to the market.

Although the book doesn't give many hands-on tools or methods on how to start changing your business toward a more revolutionary one, it gives something to think about. Too many businesses today are run in an evolutionary way.

I'd recommend the book for managers, entrepreneurs and business owners who haven't yet adopted the revolutionary frame of mind. Those who have will probably feel like I-knew-this after reading the book. Researchers and educators will probably find nice examples from the book, but it's not very useful as a resource book.


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