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TaoTronics® Pet UV Urine Detector Flashlight / Blacklight
TaoTronics® Pet UV Urine Detector Flashlight / Blacklight
Offered by Sunvalleytek-UK
Price: £20.00

5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars, 7 Jun. 2015
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
AOK


World Atlas 2011
World Atlas 2011
Price: £3.28

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars shallow, 4 Nov. 2012
This review is from: World Atlas 2011 (Kindle Edition)
This atlas is shallow and will be of little use to most. The maps are fine but the information about locations is haphazard and incomplete. There are better choices out there.


Monty Python & Holy Grail [DVD] [1975] [Region 1] [US Import] [NTSC]
Monty Python & Holy Grail [DVD] [1975] [Region 1] [US Import] [NTSC]
Offered by EliteDigital UK
Price: £24.95

3 of 21 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars blah, 11 July 2012
All the more for how clear in retrospect the individual quality of the actors and writers involved is, Holy Grail turns out to have aged badly. The jokes are heavy and repetitive. The relative rudeness that was groundbreaking in its day is quaint at best. The dialog is stuffy and less imaginative than rambling, with some pedantic moments. The filming and lighting are sub-par, even on the better transfers.
Whatever prompted John Cleese to return for this one, the last hurrah of the original Monty Pythons was more a last gasp, with rare funny moments drowned in tedious filler.
Comment Comment (1) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Mar 27, 2013 12:57 PM GMT


The Times Atlas of the World: Comprehensive Edition (Times Atlases)
The Times Atlas of the World: Comprehensive Edition (Times Atlases)
by Times Atlases
Edition: Hardcover
Price: £131.49

14 of 16 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Mostly fine if you don't get caught in the orchestrated campaign about Greenland, 9 Oct. 2011
As the two previous reviews elaborate at length (and, oddly, exclusively), there is a controversy about one map in this 13th edition of The Times Comprehensive Atlas of the World. This pertains to Greenland - an issue of importance to geographers and climate scientists certainly, but let us keep things in perspective. The one-star reviews appear to be part of a campaign against Murdoch; nothing wrong with that, but here I will consider this as an atlas for everyday use by the informed but casual user - and there, it still shines.
The Greenland map, with 56,000 inhabitants or 0.0008% of the world population (and a few thousands of tourists visiting each year), is hardly relevant to the vast majority of buyers who will use it to visit past and future travels, look up obscure places in the news, etc.
Like the 12th edition, the 13th edition falls short of the exemplary coverage of all regions of the world at a minimum scale of 1:5,000,000 (and often much less) that was found in earlier editions. It uses computer rendering rather than the elegant copper plate renderings of earlier editions. Of course, the upside is that it is updated, and other than Greenland relatively error-free. As such, this remains the best current atlas out there for the curious, casual everyday user - unless perhaps you want to spend all your time in Greenland, or staring at the Greenland map.
Comment Comments (2) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Nov 6, 2011 12:09 PM GMT


Intellectuals
Intellectuals
by Paul Johnson
Edition: Paperback

3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars whose bent mind?, 29 May 2011
This review is from: Intellectuals (Paperback)
The topic is facile: Find foibles, weaknesses and objectionable behaviors among a select list of writers.
The list itself is laboriously skewed, ignoring both the same flaws among right-wing thinkers Johnson would be friendly to, and the population of thinkers of all sides whose lives were and are under control.
Johnson's targets are all men, all the better to dig up more or less objectionable material in their sex life if all else fails.
The inaccuracies and outright lies on Johnson's part are legion, encompassing for instance pretty much every aspect of Russell's life and work (see Nicholas Griffin's review in Russell, Winter 1990-91); ignoring, for instance, Sartre's engagement in favor of politically oppressed intellectuals of all side, his support of money-losing causes, and his contributions to art critique as well as political philosophy; etc.
The reading is mostly light and accessible, as befits a hack job of this kind edited by a political press, but even the grammar is questionable in places - where tense is abused, for instance, to juxtapose unrelated events in a writer's life.
In the end, as a reflection on the writers targeted, there are some fine moments. But, as a reflection on Johnson, this is pretty telling too.


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