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Getting Started at Fly Fishing for Trout
Getting Started at Fly Fishing for Trout
by Allan Sefton
Edition: Paperback
Price: £5.99

7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great way to get to know fly fishing, 11 April 2013
Allan Sefton's book is entertaining and pragmatic, and stuffed with technical facts which are presented simply. The tone of the book is both passionate (for the sport) and respectful (of the quarry). It is reassuringly detailed on the basic equipment needed and the techniques for assembling it. There is a great section on knots, for example. Throughout, the specialised terminology of the sport is used - but the author takes care to explain each term simply and straightforwardly so the reader quickly becomes familiar with it. Once the basic equipment (or "tackle") has been covered, the book goes on to describe the essential art of casting, followed by a long and immensely interesting section on tactics for catching trout " on the fly". It is a fine, no-nonsense introduction to this sport, including practical guidance on sources of equipment, training and fishing spots - encouraging, but also making clear what is required of the person wanting to become a fly-fisher. Highly recommended by this reviewer, who came to fly-fishing in her 30s and never lost the passion!


Where the Green Ants Dream (Wo die grünen Ameisen träumen) [1984] [DVD]
Where the Green Ants Dream (Wo die grünen Ameisen träumen) [1984] [DVD]
Dvd ~ Bruce Spence
Price: £12.28

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Herzog in Australia, 7 Feb 2010
In this film Werner Herzog justifies his reputation as "the most metaphysical film-maker". It is worth seeing multiple times.

On one level, the film is a thinly-veiled account of the battle between the Aboriginal inhabitants (Yolngu) of the Gove Peninsula in north-east Arnhem Land and the government-supported bauxite mining company Nabalco - even incorporating a court case presided over by Justice Blackburn which mirrors the real-life case (Milirrpum v Nabalco) which Nabalco won in the decision of 1971.

Among the Aboriginal cast, Dadayna `Roy' Marika (1931-93), who plays the character Dayipu, was the acknowledged "Father of the Land Rights Movement" in Australia, launching the Yolngu challenge in the 1960s against Nabalco's mining ambitions. His elder brother Wandjuk (1927-87), who plays the "chief mediator" character Miliritbi and both composed and performed the music, also participated in the Nabalco case - and throughout his life brought his celebrated talents as artist, composer and musician to the rôle of cultural mediator between black and white.

A more metaphysical level is expressed through the character of the young geologist Lance Hackett. Bruce Spence is utterly believable as Hackett, whose straightforward decency and openness cause him to rethink his view of himself ("I'm just a geologist") as the film progresses. Despite being a scientist, he cannot find it in himself to ignore the Yolngu's story that putting explosives in the ground in this place will disturb the green ants who are magnetic and thus hold the world together. It is significant that Hackett first appears in the film as an open-minded person giving time to the seemingly irrational in the shape of Mrs Strehlow. And as he becomes more questioning of his own culture (represented by the mining company and the law courts) the structure of his world unravels, leaving him unsure, needing to find better answers.

The themes of certainty and uncertainty, the juxtaposition of a passion for place with secular (legal and financial) considerations are superbly evoked by the excellent cinematography of Jörg Schmidt-Reitwein and the strangely dissonant soundtrack which includes Wandjuk Marika on didjeridu, some religious Fauré, some romantic Wagner, and a lot of silence.


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