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William Avery
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Asus PCE-N15 - 300Mbps Wireless N PCI-E adapter. 802.11n, WPS for quick secure wireless connection setup, Software AP, 3 Year Warranty
Asus PCE-N15 - 300Mbps Wireless N PCI-E adapter. 802.11n, WPS for quick secure wireless connection setup, Software AP, 3 Year Warranty
Offered by NORDPC
Price: £15.80

4.0 out of 5 stars Good on Ubuntu 13.10, 17 Dec 2013
This worked straight out of the box for me on Ubuntu 13.10 Saucy Salamander. The accompanying CD has the driver source.


Maxsima - Auto Focus 3 Piece MACRO EXTENSION TUBES / SET, for NIKON AF AF-S DX FX, Compatible with DSLR D40X D40 D50 D60 D70 D3000 D3100 D3200 D5000 D5100 D5200 D7000 D7100 D80 D90 D100 D200 D300 D300S D700 D600 D800 D2 D3 D4 - F6 F5 F75 F100, 50mm 35mm 28mm 24mm etc..
Maxsima - Auto Focus 3 Piece MACRO EXTENSION TUBES / SET, for NIKON AF AF-S DX FX, Compatible with DSLR D40X D40 D50 D60 D70 D3000 D3100 D3200 D5000 D5100 D5200 D7000 D7100 D80 D90 D100 D200 D300 D300S D700 D600 D800 D2 D3 D4 - F6 F5 F75 F100, 50mm 35mm 28mm 24mm etc..
Offered by Cameramarket UK
Price: £62.95

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Working nicely with my D5100, 16 July 2012
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
These go on (and come off!) my camera with a reassuring smoothness and a gentle click.

I have so far only used these with the 18-55mm kit zoom that came with the camera. Autofocus works as well as can be expected, as long as one bring the lens to a ballpark distance from the subject. (This isn't a function of the tubes, as such.) Using all three tubes is beyond my requirements with this lens, but would clearly be useful for longer focal lengths.


The Cookery Book of Lady Clark of Tillypronie
The Cookery Book of Lady Clark of Tillypronie
by Lady Of Tillypronie Clark
Edition: Hardcover
Price: £21.86

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Anyone for Hare Croquettes?, 13 Sep 2010
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Assuming you are, like me, the sort of person who enjoys reading cookbooks from cover to cover, and that you have the imagination to do without pictures, you will find this is a most entertaining book.

I first saw the name of Lady Clark of Tillypronie in Elizabeth David's Summer Cooking (Penguin Cookery Library). One of her recipes given there describes how to make use of a grouse that is too old and tough to eat, by using it to flavour beefsteak. Anyone who has lived in the household of a hunter will know that simply throwing game away on the grounds that it is uneatable is not an option that the hunter will willingly entertain; so I marked her down as a canny woman who knew how to avoid domestic ructions, but fondly imagined her, with the confidence that comes from complete ignorance, as the wife of a rustic Scots laird. In fact her husband was a career diplomat, the son of Sir James Clark, who was Queen Victoria and Prince Albert's physician. The pair resided at various times in Paris, Brussels, Turin and Vienna. She was also the daughter of Justice Thomas Coltman of the Court of Common Pleas, and as a girl was annually taken to continental Europe on holiday. So it's no surprise that she was a culinary sophisticate, who employed French and Italian chefs, and was able to quote recipes from the royal kitchens, as well as knowing how to keep the flavour of turnips out of a cow's milk.

Luckily for us, she was also a compulsive notetaker, and so provides us with a capacious and mixed bag of recipes. Her and her father's high social connections give some of the recipes the air of Hello! magazine. The Prince de Polignac seems a regular guy: he likes his eggs on fried bread with tomato sauce. Mrs Ford Maddox Ford suggests rabbit in a very spicy chasseur sauce. Did she really mean a whole chili and its seeds? It would seem that the Prince of Wales was partial to a sort of Cheese Jelly. ( It's called "Parmesan Cream", but it's clearly a Cheese Jelly.) The Clarks' Milanese chef, Cataldi, had worked for the Rothschilds, and his syrup for a savarin certainly indicates a casual extravagance in culinary matters: it's tempting to recreate it, but a well stocked drinks cabinet is required. We also get his take on Chicken Marengo, as well as an interesting version of risotto.

Amongst other things I was treated in imagination to a `ball supper' of chilled cream of chicken, washed down with champagne punch in which floated lemon water ice. This book certainly leaves us in no doubt about the elevated position of chilled and frozen food in the social and gastronomic hierarchy of the late nineteenth century. We are also told, not how we, but how our butler, should serve a baba. As with most general cookbooks of this vintage, there is also a selection of recipes for invalids, including Effervescing Gruel, which I've not heard of before, and which should, if nothing else, keep the patient entertained.

Sir John provides a single recipe, for chicken fried in batter seasoned with a mixture of spices: too bad for him that he died before the Colonel came on the scene.

I'm off for a Polignac sandwich.


Mums Know Best: The Hairy Bikers' Family Cookbook
Mums Know Best: The Hairy Bikers' Family Cookbook
by Hairy Bikers
Edition: Hardcover
Price: £7.00

24 of 29 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Blast from the past, 21 Jan 2010
If you saw the series and know you want the recipes, this is a well put together book with excellent photographs, clear decent size print, and a robust binding suitable for the kitchen. If you are not familiar with the series, be aware that one man's "comfort food", which is what many of these recipes are, is another man's stodge. Since many of the recipes were collected from mothers and grandmothers, the repertoire of traditional English food presented here is full of things that will stick to your ribs, and probably your hips, such as Sausage Plait and Treacle Tart.

However, a substantial portion of the recipes are not traditional English, but South Asian ("Indian"), US, Estonian, Portuguese and so on. These are likely to be the ones of most interest to experienced UK cooks, and I'm looking forward to trying some of them out. Sadly there are no Polish recipes: I do enjoy Polish food.

Most of the recipes are for quantities to feed six or eight.


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