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Amazon Customer "Jams" (Manchester, UK)

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Game Of Thrones - A Telltale Games Series
Game Of Thrones - A Telltale Games Series
Price: £0.00

1.0 out of 5 stars Black cat in a coal cellar..., 23 Jan. 2016
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I was excited to see the first episode of the Telltale Games GOT game was available on my Kindle Fire as I'd heard good things about Telltale Games products, and I couldn't wait to play it. Unfortunately there seems to be something wrong with the graphics - everything is pitch black. You're lucky if you can make out a few shadowy figures. I managed to struggle through (in the hope things might improve) until what sounds like a battle. I presume my character is supposed to kill someone, but, as I can't see a thing, I have no idea who I'm meant to be aiming at. I think my character keeps dying as a result and I get stuck in a loop, going round and round the same scene. I'm sure the game is great.... if you can actually play it! Very disappointing!


Greater Manchester Street Atlas (A-Z Street Atlas)
Greater Manchester Street Atlas (A-Z Street Atlas)
by Geographers' A-Z Map Company
Edition: Spiral-bound
Price: £12.05

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent street atlas, 10 Aug. 2012
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I recently bought this street atlas as a replacement for my old Philips one, and I was not disappointed. The street map covers a wide area, stretching from the outskirts of Skelmersdale right across to the edge of the Peak District, and from just north of Rochdale to Macclesfield. The street maps are 3 1/3 inches to a mile, which I find perfectly comfortable to read, and contain all the information you need. I particularly like the arrows to indicate one-way streets, as these could prove invaluable if you find yourself lost in an unfamiliar area. The map also features symbols to show long-term speed cameras and their speed limits. There are also larger scale maps of the centres of Wigan, Bolton, Altrincham, Stockport, Ashton-Under-Lyne, Oldham, Rochdale and Bury, in addition to Manchester, all of which have a scale of 6 2/3 inches to a mile, and a smaller scale road map showing the major routes around the Manchester area. The flaps on the cover are also a handy feature as they are useful for holding your place in the map. All in all, I'm very pleased with my purchase and wouldn't hesitate to buy other maps in the series.


Garou: Ein Schaf-Thriller
Garou: Ein Schaf-Thriller
by Leonie Swann
Edition: Hardcover
Price: £13.46

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great follow-up!, 14 Mar. 2012
Following on from 'Glennkill: Ein Schafskrimi' (English: Three Bags Full), 'Garou' unites us back with George's Irish flock of sheep, who have now embarked on their long-promised trip to Europe with George's daughter, Rebecca, and her sheepdog, Tess. Their travels have led them to France, where they are currently spending the winter in a field next to a herd of goats, a spooky forest and a creepy castle. When dead deer begin to be found in the forest, rumours circulate that the `Garou', a werewolf, is to blame. Should Miss Maple and co. heed the warnings of the mysterious ram who shares their field or the goats next door? Who or what is the Garou? And who is next on his list? To protect themselves and their shepherdess, Miss Maple and co. decide to try and solve the mystery of the Garou once and for all...

I thoroughly enjoyed Glennkill, and Garou doesn't disappoint. The tone is much darker than Glennkill as the story is packed with suspense, but the book still contains all the funny little sheepy quirks and wisdom that made Glennkill so enjoyable. I would definitely recommend it to anyone who loved the first book or is looking for something fun and different to read.


NINTENDO DSi 3DS or DS Lite 3 in 1 * AZURE * Blue Carry Case Pouch
NINTENDO DSi 3DS or DS Lite 3 in 1 * AZURE * Blue Carry Case Pouch
Offered by consoles_and_gadgets
Price: £8.88

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Good case for DSi, 12 Oct. 2011
= Durability:5.0 out of 5 stars  = Fun:1.0 out of 5 stars  = Educational:1.0 out of 5 stars 
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This case fits my Nintendo DSi (NOT XL) beautifully and even has an elasticated strap inside so you can use the device without taking it out of the case. The case also holds 3 compartments for games and has an internal mesh pocket for any other bits and pieces you might need to carry with you. The picture of the item above looks a little purple-ish, although in reality the case is more like royal blue - it matches my metallic blue DSi.
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Ingo
Ingo
by Helen Dunmore
Edition: Paperback

0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Distinct lack of mermaids!, 13 Sept. 2011
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This review is from: Ingo (Paperback)
Ok, this is a children's book, but I've always been a bit of a mermaid fan and I read some good reviews, so I thought I'd give it a go.

The plot revolves around Sapphire Trewhella who lives on the coast in Cornwall with her parents and older brother Connor. One day, Sapphire and Connor's father mysteriously disappears after taking his boat out at night. Rumours fly that that he's either been involved in an accident out at sea or he's run off with another woman. However, Sapphire and Connor refuse to believe either of these explanations and vow to keep looking for him. It soon becomes clear to them both that the sea they've lived next to all of their lives has a power they could never have imagined.

Bearing in mind that this is a children's book, I still felt that the writing was more juvenile than it should be. The plot dragged on in places, and the characters (particularly Sapphire) seemed rather annoying and whiney. The merpeople didn't come across as particularly likeable to me, either. I was also disappointed that most of the story took place on land rather than in the sea, and only two merpeople appeared in the story. However, the descriptions of the underwater world were vivid and the author obviously loves the sea. Overall, the plot was rather lacklustre and didn't really seem to go anywhere. The key question throughout the book is what happened to the children's father, yet this isn't answered, only hinted at. Evidently the author wanted to save this for a future book, but it meant that this book ended up having quite a weak plot.


Flim-Flam: The Truth about Unicorns, Parapsychology and Other Delusions
Flim-Flam: The Truth about Unicorns, Parapsychology and Other Delusions
by James Randi
Edition: Paperback

3.0 out of 5 stars Excellent content, but a little long-winded in places, 7 Sept. 2011
James Randi is well-known as a magician and outspoken sceptic of all things paranormal. His mission to expose paranormal and pseudoscientific frauds and promote critical thinking among the public is well documented, as is his million dollar prize for anyone who can demonstrate paranormal abilities under controlled conditions.

This book, published in 1982, discusses some of the main areas of the paranormal and pseudoscience, including dowsing, UFOs, fairies, psychic surgery and religious cults. In terms of subject matter, this book is excellent. Randi discusses all of the topics in great detail, with a huge amount of information regarding previous `tests' performed on those claiming to have paranormal abilities and his own investigations. He discusses in detail the lengths to which he has gone to investigate as objectively as possible the extraordinary claims of those wishing to win his prize. One of the most interesting aspects of the book is the various rationalisations and excuses that some of these people give to explain away their failures. It really makes you think about what you believe and why. The book ends with a long list of publications, some of which are pro-paranormal and others are anti-paranormal, for anyone wishing to look into any of the topics further.

The only negative aspect of this book for me was the sometimes rather long-winded prose. I found myself getting bored at times, as the pace of the text really slowed down. That said, I'm very glad I persevered as it is certainly a very important and informative book for anyone willing to take a critical look at the paranormal and pseudoscience.


SFR Ice/Inline/Roller Skate Carry Bag - Pink/Grey BAG003P
SFR Ice/Inline/Roller Skate Carry Bag - Pink/Grey BAG003P
Offered by It's All Fun & Games
Price: £14.95

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Sizing problem, 12 July 2011
This bag is described on this page as fitting up to adult size 9 skates and I have seen it described on many skate retailers' websites as suitable for adult size 10. However, I found it to be a very tight fit for my adult size 7.5 ladies Jackson Mystique figure ice skates, so I have no idea how they are meant to fit adult size 10s! Unless you are buying for a child, I would be wary of buying this bag without trying it yourself first.


The Truth About Psychics: What's Real, What's Not, and How to Tell the Difference
The Truth About Psychics: What's Real, What's Not, and How to Tell the Difference
by Sylvia Browne
Edition: Hardcover
Price: £14.99

3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Vague opinionated propaganda, 5 May 2011
I picked up this book in my local library, where its title "The Truth About Psychics" intrigued me. I became even more curious when I realised that the book was written by a self-proclaimed psychic, who promised to arm readers with the tools to enable them to spot a fraud. Faced with this tantalising prospect, I promptly took the book out on loan.

The book begins with a long section on how Sylvia Browne allegedly discovered her psychic abilities. There's lots of talk of spirit guides and psychic grandmothers, as well as an undertone of injustice when discussing how some people didn't automatically believe in her abilities. This is followed by a rather waffly section about the way different cultures have traditionally viewed life after death.

Next we come to a section entitled "Tricks of the Trade". I thought maybe we'd finally come to the section I'd been waiting for, but, alas, no. She spends this section mainly talking about various supposed branches of psychic abilities, such as clairvoyance, palmistry etc. This is followed by a section on 'pioneers', who all seem to be heroes of Browne that are in some way linked to spiritualism.

Finally, we come to the section that promises to reveal how to spot a fake. Only a very small part (2 & 1/2 pages) is devoted to general psychic ability - the rest seems to focus on curses and fortune-telling (specifically physical mediumship). The two pages on psychic ability provide a very brief overview of cold reading - so brief that it's really of very little use. Bearing in mind the title of the book, it seems amazing that the book's main topic is only dealt with in such a fleeting way. Browne then claims that she always tries to provide reasonable details, although nothing specific like dates of birth, and provides information that the client doesn't already know (how convenient!). In my opinion, this rather vague statement doesn't really clarify how what she claims to do is any different to the fake psychics she's so against. As a result, you can't help but wonder if this book is just a propaganda campaign to try and discredit her competition.

In general, the book is incredibly long-winded and lacks focus. One minute she's lauding over Harry Houdini and other sceptics who've worked to expose fake psychics and mediums, then she's complaining that people don't believe her and criticising the self-same sceptics for raising questions over Uri Geller's supposed psychic abilities (while Browne seems inexplicably convinced of his abilities, Geller himself has recently stopped referring to himself as 'psychic'). In her introduction she derides fake psychics for cashing in and exploiting vulnerable people, which seems ironic considering that the back jacket of the book reveals that at least 22 of her books have been best-sellers! Most curiously, on page 18, she mentions that her abilities have undergone testing. A very quick Internet search reveals that, in 2001 on the Larry King Live show, Browne stated that she would be happy for the well-known sceptic, James Randi, to test her abilities. To date, she's yet to arrange a test. This begs the question: if she's so happy to be tested and claims to have been tested before, why hasn't she arranged this already? Surely it would be the ideal way to silence her critics.

She seems to be equally confused about her list of 'pioneers'. Most of the people that she's chosen to write about either admitted that they were fakes (e.g. the Fox sisters) or, in many cases, Browne herself seems to think it rather unlikely that they had any genuine psychic ability. And, yet, she always manages to add a small twist to the story to plant a seed of doubt. She even claims that Sir Arthur Conan Doyle was psychic, although I've yet to find any evidence to corroborate this.

The whole book is incredibly vague and contradictory, and lacks any footnotes, references or even a recommended reading list that would enable the public to validate her sources. Ultimately, then, what we have here is a book that's essentially an opinion piece and doesn't even deliver on what it promises (to reveal how to spot a fake). Browne seems to be hoping that if she's vague enough and simultaneously aligns herself with and distances herself from her sceptics, she'll create a sense of trust in her audience that will encourage them to turn to her over her competitors.

Save your money - this book isn't worth it.
Comment Comments (2) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Nov 29, 2011 10:40 AM GMT


Paranormality: Why we see what isn't there
Paranormality: Why we see what isn't there
by Richard Wiseman
Edition: Paperback

4 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Highly recommended!, 27 April 2011
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Before reading this book I'd seen a fair few reviews of it here on Amazon claiming it was an arrogant, biased view of the unexplained. I'm happy to say that such accounts couldn't be further from the truth!

Of course, Richard Wiseman is well-known for his sceptical views amongst those interested in the supernatural, so the sceptical slant of the book shouldn't surprise anyone. However, I found the book's content to be deeply interesting and very well researched and justified. The book also has a refreshing, witty tone. At no point did I sense any arrogance from Prof. Wiseman - in fact, he seemed very sympathetic towards those who believe in the supernatural. At several points in the book he talks about how we, as humans, are hard-wired to believe in the unknown, as this belief may have provided an evolutionary advantage. This is far from the snobbery that I was expecting judging by some other reviews! The book is subtitled "Why We See What Isn't There", and this pretty much sums up the real focus of the book - not just to debunk everything, but instead to try and understand WHY we are so prone to believing in things without needing evidence. I also found Wiseman's explanations of why certain conclusions were drawn to be very fair (e.g. the Jaytee research or research into the alleged psychic Patricia Putt). At times Wiseman many seem a little matter-of-fact, but at no point did I notice him say that the results of the research categorically proved that someone didn't have psychic abilities; he simply states that the studies did not show any evidence of psychic abilities, which would appear to still allow enough scope for someone to have abilities that simply weren't demonstrated effectively on the day - not the behaviour of someone who's arrogant or thinks he knows everything!

There's a long bibliography at the end of the book for anyone who wants to research more about the individual points covered. I particularly liked the QR tags (newfangled barcodes!) throughout the book that link to videos and audio clips that complement the book's content (URLs are also provided for anyone who doesn't have a smartphone).

This book probably won't convince any believers, and the content is probably very familiar to anyone who's already well-read on the topics covered in the book, but I would highly recommend it as a starting point to anyone who's curious about the world and interested in finding out about the unexplained.


Watching the English: The Hidden Rules of English Behaviour
Watching the English: The Hidden Rules of English Behaviour
by Kate Fox
Edition: Paperback
Price: £6.99

5 of 7 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Interesting but frustrating, 26 Mar. 2011
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I feel I have something of a love-hate relationship with this book. It's clever, insightful and funny, and yet I couldn't help feeling frustrated the further into the book I got. At one point, Kate Fox mentions that she's never criticised for being overly negative, only for being deemed to be too complimentary to the English. However, in an obvious attempt to avoid being `too complimentary', it seems she's gone too far in the other direction. I feel she's excessively critical of the English, referring to what she calls our "social dis-ease" as a "condition" that "infects" various parts of our lives, and over the course of the book, this negativity began to seriously grate on my nerves. She also refers to this `dis-ease' as an inability to be like normal people, with her barometer of normality being Romance language countries such as France, Spain and Italy. What about the rest of the world? The author frequently makes sweeping generalisations, apparently basing these on research predominantly in the south of England and involving small groups of participants. Many of her observations seem inaccurate or out-dated, and the author's class snobbishness also became rather irritating over time. All in all, there are some positives to this book but they're outweighed by a rather lopsided view of England and English society.


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