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Jesus Lied - He Was Only Human: Debunking The New Testament
Jesus Lied - He Was Only Human: Debunking The New Testament
by CJ Werleman
Edition: Paperback
Price: 12.95

5 of 7 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Rough hatchet job, 15 Feb 2011
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There have been several books attacking Christianity from different perspectives over the last hundred years. This is yet another. It is something of a Beginner's Guide to What's Wrong with Christianity. The factual details incorporated into Werleman's argument are generally accurate but not always so. And it is a pity that more care was not taken to check the proofs for occasional typos. However it is a useful handbook to reinforce the idea that Jesus was not all he is cracked up to be: it won't convince the believer, but almost nothing can do that. It will however make a cheerful reading experience for anyone who has happily shaken off the tentacles of religion or who never suffered from a 'faith injection' and who would like to know what all the fuss is about.


Senza Parole - 100 Gesti Degli Italiani
Senza Parole - 100 Gesti Degli Italiani
by Diadori
Edition: Paperback
Price: 15.95

4.0 out of 5 stars Let the hands do the talking, 26 Nov 2010
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If you ever watch native Italians in an animated conversation or delivering an impassioned speech, you will see the emphasis that is possible, and the slight modifications of mood that are signified, by hand gestures. This book gives a wide selection of those that are commonly used in day-to-day communication. Of course, the conventions are not confined to the gestures used in this book and it is up to the individual speaker to adapt some of these common gestures to his/her own outlook and approach to the spoken word. At the same time, the book gives a very good idea of what to look out for in native speakers as well as providing a few unexpected examples which would mean nothing to anyone not brought up in an Italian environment.
The rather sketchy drawings of each hand movement or facial expression could be better, but there are some old photographs showing prominent Italians using some of the gestures to make their point more emphatic. An enjoyable book which will help you to get your own hands working towards a more colourful use of Italian.


Complete Italian Grammar Review (Barron's Foreign Language Guides)
Complete Italian Grammar Review (Barron's Foreign Language Guides)
by M. Danesi
Edition: Paperback
Price: 10.99

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Generally reliable and complete, 26 Nov 2010
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This is a fine book that covers all the standard rules of grammar in a well-organised way. The exercises are designed to give plenty of practice on all details covered in the explanations of new syntax or accidental grammar. Unlike some other course books, this one includes sentences to be translated from English to Italian, which really test whether you have understood and mastered the new section of the grammar course. You may however find some of the exercises rather repetitive or unduly prolonged, and it does no harm to complete only part of these questions once it is obvious that you know what is needed. I have given it four stars because, as is often the case with Barron's otherwise excellent books, this contains a few obvious misprints which can easily be spotted even by learners and which should really have been removed before the first print-run.


Is Christianity True?
Is Christianity True?
by Michael Arnheim
Edition: Hardcover

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Getting down to basics, 5 Feb 2010
This review is from: Is Christianity True? (Hardcover)
Michael Arnheim writes as a distinguished scholar and Professor of Classical Civilisation at the University of Witwatersrand. Taking the undeniable fact that Christianity is largely founded on the Bible as history and prophecy, he examines whether the religion stands up to its own evidence. In particular he concentrates on the position accorded to Jesus in the Bible. Of special interest is his long analysis of Jesus' claims to be the Messiah: there are many specific references to what the Jews actually believed the Messiah would be and what he would accomplish. On both these counts the author finds Jesus wanting. The quotations from the Old Testament are given in their proper context, not - as is often the case with works of Apologetics - as merely detached verses. From this it is well argued that the Messiah was expected to be the head of a new Jewish kingdom on Earth, actively restoring the independence of the Jewish people and subordinating those who were hostile to this kingdom. Besides this, the Messiah was predicted to be a direct descendent of King David which, for obvious reasons, was not the case. He also had to be born in Bethlehem: the author is able to deal with this part of the story with his scholarly instincts.
Similarly, Arnheim uses his knowledge of Roman law to discuss exactly what procedure was really in force at the trial of Jesus. He concludes that the gospels are maliciously slanted against the Jews in order to recommend the faith to a Gentile readership.
Of considerable significance is the debate about whether Jesus introduced a new ethic into the religious life of the Jews. The final chapter takes the claims of such a pattern of ethical standards and points out how unable Jesus himself is to lead by example. So far from loving his enemies as he preached, he denounces them all roundly. And he sets standards which, not just for Jews but for all humanity, are impossible, particularly on the subject of sexual morality.
Naturally there is a good deal of reference to the adaptations introduced by Paul to the new religion.
In about 200 pages, the arguments are concise but complete; and there is an impressive bibliography which will help with further reading. I found this book absorbing and the thesis that the new religion was far from true is eminently persuasive.


Charles and Camilla
Charles and Camilla
by Gyles Brandreth
Edition: Hardcover

16 of 40 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars An Insider's Biography, 9 Dec 2005
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This review is from: Charles and Camilla (Hardcover)
Gyles Brandreth can write almost as amusingly as he can talk. And if you have heard him talk, you will know that, once he opens his mouth, he doesn’t stop to draw breath if he can help it! This book seems to enjoy the best and the worst qualities of the author rather than those of the two subjects. There is, frankly, not a great deal here which we did not already know about Charles or Camilla. Their backgrounds are given lengthy and fairly balanced histories from which both appear to be ideally suited to each other. The author knows them both quite well and he has certainly spoken to many of their close friends, most of whom he feels able to name. His conclusion seems to be that, whatever the individual shortcomings of Charles and Camilla, their combination as a couple enjoys the best prospects for happiness all round. The former lady in the equation is brilliantly summed up on page 233. I have never read a more accurate analysis of the Diana experience: you must buy the book to find out what I mean! You will also find it useful to construct some family trees. Brandreth goes into interminable length to enumerate all the family connections of both of himself and of everyone remotely connected with those he is describing: his footnotes are almost annoyingly detailed, sometimes straying onto the next page. The price that Amazon is charging for this book makes it well worth buying. You will be assured of an entertaining read.


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