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Simon J. Whight "fourfourfun" (Manchester)
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Plat De Jour
Plat De Jour
Offered by figswigs
Price: £6.44

11 of 12 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Real House, 7 Sept. 2005
This review is from: Plat De Jour (Audio CD)
House music. Its just a load of bass drums and one note bass lines isn't it? Perhaps some blonde binty screaming about Pretty Green Eyes over the top of it if you're lucky. Well, that's what you'd be lead to believe. If someone came along to you and peddled the concept of a house album constructed using samples of food cooking, kitchen utensils and general samples of the animals used in cooking, you'd think they were mad. Unachievable. Unthinkable.
Not Herbert. To him, that's a concept to sink your teeth into. For me, this is a man who kickstarted the entire glitchy mistake house ideology. Have you ever bumped into a radiator round your house and thought 'Hey, that'd make an interesting sounding hihat' or mused over the possibilities of using the sound of tenderizing meat as a viable bass drum? Mr Herbert obviously has. Not restricted by the limitations that a virtual synth has to offer, the entire world is his toy. Now, on paper, an album that has (amongst its various delights) an interlude based around the noise of cooking bacon may sound like a potential novelty mess. It doesn't. Herbert has a reputation of a crafter of fine deep house music, Plat Du Jour is a proper musical delight. Melodic, creative, gritty yet never succumbing to 'Look at me! I'm using a sausage as a snare drum!' obviously novelty cliches. Think of the way Coldcut laid the plans for this kind of music by creating the very 'Green' Timber, a track made entirely of samples of deforestation provided to them by Greenpeace. Plat Du Jour is as musical and innovative as any of the latest IDM offerings from Warp, in fact I like the idea that its more of an anti-IDM concept by moving to the opposite end of the musical spectrum ... away from the mechanics and towards the organics. Hell, you even get a stonking stand out vocal cut in there, chanting 'Go Gordon! Go Ramsey! Go David! Go Victoria!' with more grit and funk than you could shake a large Basement Jaxx sized stick at. Quirky and unique.
In a market that's becoming dominated by bland-as-you-like, ever so earnest guitar wielding singer/songwriters who, if you heard them playing in a pub/London Underground station, you probably wouldn't give a flying fug about, this is like having a breath of fresh air blown into a musty guff ridden public loo. Relief.


Fabric24: Rob da Bank
Fabric24: Rob da Bank
Offered by Fulfillment Express
Price: £14.64

17 of 18 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Yumm-eh, 7 Sept. 2005
This review is from: Fabric24: Rob da Bank (Audio CD)
Another Fabric, another quality mix, its hard to find any competition in the DJ mix field that puts out this quantity of mixes yet keeps the quality and range fresh and exciting. September sees Rob Da Bank step up to the plate which, I have to admit, puzzled me. I'd picked up a few Rob Da Bank Blue Room mixes in the past and was expecting this to be a summer chill session on paper, lots of relaxing folky vibes along the lines of fellow Blue Room-er Chris Coco. You forget, however, that the likes of Coco can shift up a gear with the likes of Coco & Rui's tribaliscious Coco Da Silva project, here Rob does more than a solid job for the housier side of the Fabric series. He pulls off one of the most memorable in recent times with a little help from the sparkle of Ableton Live.
Glancing over the tracklisting, the signals were clear to read, a couple of choice tracks from the oh so fantastic Nathan Fake with the happy bleeps and tweaks of Dinamo and James Holden glitchy prog reworking of The Sky Is Pink present. The mix itself starts of very fat and funky before hitting the wonderful glitchy Nathan Fake section. A smile and a tapping foot appears as the insane vocal and trumpet samples from the opener kick in and the fresh lyrics and groovy vibes on Wanna Get Wet from the always impressive Soul Mekanik just make you want to shake. After a lush glitchy house section rounded off by The Sky Is Pink, we hit upon some particularly insistent techno drum patterns before everything changes into a lively soundclash between indierock and electrobeats. The likes of The Futureheads and The Fiery Furnaces provide some indie growl while the electronics keep pushing the mix right onto the dancefloor. The mix rounds off with a couple of Trax classics, house music originals Can You Feel It and Your Love, almost as if making the statement 'this is where we came from, and this is the agenda for the house of now'. A complete lack of fear to drop anything slightly different, old or new.
No doubt this counts towards the opinion that Rob is the new John Peel. Be it in the press or in the forums, this is something I've heard more than once. To be truthful, there is only one John Peel, stick Fabric 7 next to this offering to hear the contrasting sounds offered up. Perhaps this is our continual need to label someone as 'the next X'. Rob is, however, picking up the baton where John dropped it, continuing to push the music and sounds that he believes are worth it. You could take each individual track from this mix, sit down and listen to it from beginning to end. A mix where the skills are never more important that the contents. This is the legacy and ideology left behind by John Peel and where the similarities lie, lets hope that Rob (and many others!) keep carrying it forwards.


Sony Ericsson K750i - Mobile Phone - Silver - Sim Free
Sony Ericsson K750i - Mobile Phone - Silver - Sim Free

11 of 13 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Fave phone of the mo, 1 Sept. 2005
To quote an SPV loving mate who works for a mobile phone company "its the most desirable phone I've seen to date". This is one seriously impressive phone.
When it came to upgrade time, I thought to myself, what would I want from my mobile? Perhaps MP3 playing capability? How about a decent camera? These are things that have been hinted at to date but now finally realised with Sony's new wonderphone.
The camera on this beast is really solid, flick open the protective cover and unleash the 2 megapixel glory. In daylight it performs just as good as any dedicated digital camera. 4x zoom and autofocus mean you can set up and capture some quality shots. At night, arguably the time when phone cameras show their limitation, and it performs almost as well. I say almost because without night-mode, the light on and a steady hand ... you'll still be subject to slighty grainy/blurred pictures. But hey! Its the BEST I've seen a phone do in no light quality. You can get your pictures playing as a slideshow, add a soundtrack, you can switch to movie mode and record MP4 film. Various qualities of film/pictures are available depending on your purposes. Low qualities for using in messaging, high quality for those who may want to Bluetooth their results to a PC.
Now we come to MP3 playing, well for one you will need Sony mobile handsfree kits to get things playing in your ears. The standard headphones are decent but VERY uncomfortable. Better quality than the Nokia ones though. Where the good news lies is with the Fontopia design handsfree kit being an accessory to be released in the near future. The standard Fontopia headphones are frankly ACE and to have these for your mobile would give you a really strong MP3 playing device. Couple this with the phone being able to take up to 4GB Memory Stick Duo cards and you've got some real scope here. The Media Player section allows you to structure playlists to your desire.
The rest of the phone matches up the likes of the Nokia 6230, you can sync your phone on the PC with the PC Suite software. The USB cable is ace, transferring data AND recharging your phone, its just a shame that the software currently does not sync to Lotus Notes. You can pick up your emails if you tap in your ISP settings and the phone generally goes out of its way to offer just as much functionality to each phone function as possible. You can navigate through the menus via the jogstick/keypad, and additional options appear in the form of dropdowns. Its certainly a busier approach to the simplistic and easy to use Nokia phones, but this does not interfere with the actual usage of the phone and is certainly intuitive. Besides, it will take a LOT to contest Nokia's for ease of use.
You can get plenty of downloads for the phone, new themes, wallpapers, ringtones. It takes Java applications and my one came with a pretty swish fully 3D driving game!
Also on the market is the D750i, Tmobiles currently exclusive version of this phone. It is styled differently, in a very nice lilac, and has a different lens protector. Other than that it is the same phone. Soon to come is the W800i, again the same phone, but bundled with a bigger memory stick than the 64meg you get with this phone. Between that and the 32meg onboard memory, however, you'll be fine for now! The only thing I wish this phone had was replacable facias. One it helps for resale value and two you'll need to keep that screen in good nick, you're only going to get one!
I'm well chuffed, I really haven't come across anything this fantastic since I stumbled across the Nokia 6230. With this and the new 6230i out, there are clearly only two decent contenders in the mobile market right now ... all you have to do is make your choice. This one was the winner for me.


Sony Ericsson K750i - O2 Pay As You Go Mobile Phone - Black†
Sony Ericsson K750i - O2 Pay As You Go Mobile Phone - Black†

41 of 44 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars I just love my phone!, 1 Sept. 2005
To quote an SPV loving mate who works for a mobile phone company "its the most desirable phone I've seen to date". This is one seriously impressive phone.
When it came to upgrade time, I thought to myself, what would I want from my mobile? Perhaps MP3 playing capability? How about a decent camera? These are things that have been hinted at to date but now finally realised with Sony's new wonderphone.
The camera on this beast is really solid, flick open the protective cover and unleash the 2 megapixel glory. In daylight it performs just as good as any dedicated digital camera. 4x zoom and autofocus mean you can set up and capture some quality shots. At night, arguably the time when phone cameras show their limitation, and it performs almost as well. I say almost because without night-mode, the light on and a steady hand ... you'll still be subject to slighty grainy/blurred pictures. But hey! Its the BEST I've seen a phone do in no light quality. You can get your pictures playing as a slideshow, add a soundtrack, you can switch to movie mode and record MP4 film. Various qualities of film/pictures are available depending on your purposes. Low qualities for using in messaging, high quality for those who may want to Bluetooth their results to a PC.
Now we come to MP3 playing, well for one you will need Sony mobile handsfree kits to get things playing in your ears. The standard headphones are decent but VERY uncomfortable. Better quality than the Nokia ones though. Where the good news lies is with the Fontopia design handsfree kit being an accessory to be released in the near future. The standard Fontopia headphones are frankly ACE and to have these for your mobile would give you a really strong MP3 playing device. Couple this with the phone being able to take up to 4GB Memory Stick Duo cards and you've got some real scope here. The Media Player section allows you to structure playlists to your desire.
The rest of the phone matches up the likes of the Nokia 6230, you can sync your phone on the PC with the PC Suite software. The USB cable is ace, transferring data AND recharging your phone, its just a shame that the software currently does not sync to Lotus Notes. You can pick up your emails if you tap in your ISP settings and the phone generally goes out of its way to offer just as much functionality to each phone function as possible. You can navigate through the menus via the jogstick/keypad, and additional options appear in the form of dropdowns. Its certainly a busier approach to the simplistic and easy to use Nokia phones, but this does not interfere with the actual usage of the phone and is certainly intuitive. Besides, it will take a LOT to contest Nokia's for ease of use.
You can get plenty of downloads for the phone, new themes, wallpapers, ringtones. It takes Java applications and my one came with a pretty swish fully 3D driving game!
Also on the market is the D750i, Tmobiles currently exclusive version of this phone. It is styled differently, in a very nice lilac, and has a different lens protector. Other than that it is the same phone. Soon to come is the W800i, again the same phone, but bundled with a bigger memory stick than the 64meg you get with this phone. Between that and the 32meg onboard memory, however, you'll be fine for now! The only thing I wish this phone had was replacable facias. One it helps for resale value and two you'll need to keep that screen in good nick, you're only going to get one!
I'm well chuffed, I really haven't come across anything this fantastic since I stumbled across the Nokia 6230. With this and the new 6230i out, there are clearly only two decent contenders in the mobile market right now ... all you have to do is make your choice. This one was the winner for me.


76:14
76:14

16 of 16 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Pure ambience in CD form, 20 Aug. 2005
This review is from: 76:14 (Audio CD)
This is a fantastic album from the era when ambient was at its peak, rank this alongside works like The Orb's Adventures Beyond The Ultraworld, KLF's Chill Out. Those who know of Tom Middleton will probably know of his work as Cosmos (spacey lovely house), Jedi Knights (nu-school breaks which inspired the likes of Adam Freeland) and his Sound Of The Cosmos mix (which is a blinding exercise in breaks, house and downtempo spread over 3CDs) ... or perhaps the even later Global Communications tracks The Way / The Deep which explored funky cosmic house. This, however, is as far detatched from the housey Middleton as possible. 76:15 follows the 'swirling ambience' template, beatless, seamless and atmospheric ... taking you on a journey from one end of the CD to the other. Take 9:39 for example, full of deep space cosmic bleeps, a hypnotic 'warrooooooom!' bass pulse, and eerie choral synths. Definately swirling ambience. There are some astoundingly beautiful moments on here too. 14:31 is plain gorgeous, a slowly ticking clock keeps the beat of the track while lush orchestral synths create a gorgeous uplifting mood. Its not all totally beatless, 9:25 has a gentle break that helps the track move along. Think Orb's Supanova At The End Of The Universe and you're pretty much there. 7:39 features almost Plaid-y Warp style synths, while 8:07 and 5:23 work hypnotic keys over deep pulsing Sasha style bassline stabs. 12:18 finishes off the album with more dramatic orchestral synth action like in 14:31 ... a top closer.
As you can tell, the entire album is named after the sum of its track times, with each track named after how long it is. Apparently to stop the listener having preconceptions about how the music sounds before they listen to it. A nice idea, this is an album you make your own concept for, your own story ... as opposed to The Orb's journey from Earth to the Ultraworld.
Thanks to the scattering of perkier tracks, the fades between tracks with ocean waves crashing, strange chattering voices, and the sheer lushness and quality of production, the album never gets boring, its a corker. If you're into your electronica, be it a Warp head, Orb fan, Orbial ... whatever, this is one to check! With Middleton being a bit of a funky house and breaks master recently, you could pass this by ... overlook it as 'unworthy'. Don't! Its probably one of the best chill albums you can buy.
If you want things with a bit more bump to them, or in fact something less spacial. Try heading to Middleton's later albums like the Jedi Knights Nu-School Science or the aforemention epic 3CD mix The Sound Of The Cosmos. Both quality.


Metal Gear Solid 3: Snake Eater
Metal Gear Solid 3: Snake Eater
Offered by GamersCorner
Price: £11.99

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Good stuff from Snake once again, 20 Aug. 2005
This game has been such a series of ups and downs for me. First of excitement at the announcement of the sequel, then waning interest. All of a sudden a pick up in interest pre-release and I get the game in my hands, only to be a touch disappointed by the sheer amount of crawling through shrubbery and faffing around in your backpack for camoflage and items that forms such an key gameplay element of the opening section. Now, however, I'm back in ecstacy with the game following a massively impressive bike chase involving land and airborne foes ... oh, and a huge rocket powered mother of a battletank.
Yes I can finally say that MGS3 is yet another quality issue in what is becoming the PS2s key franchise. Ok, it doesn't quite have the frankly excellent twist of the original story and it doesn't really go any way to furthering the story of the Patriots that you last saw Snake involved in, but don't let that put you off. Playing as a 'different' Snake, a CIA operative in the forerunner to the FOXHOUND team, its a cold war spy thriller set in the jungles of Moscow. The usual blues and greys of MGS are replaced with cool organic browns and greens. Also, since this is the 1960's we're talking about, you have to do away with all the usual gadgetry, the codec, the soliton radar. Its PURE sneaking action. Really tense as you crouch in a patch of ruffage hoping to avoid the gaze of slowly stalking Soviet soldiers. Cracking. There is a downside to this gameplay mechanic, however, which is the backpack. Every time you need to cure, change your camoflage (FREQUENT occurance) or get something additional from your items, you have to dive in. It ruins the momentum of the game completely. Luckily, the slowly sneaking nature of the game lessens towards the end and backpack accessing is less of an intrusion.
Where MGS3 excels is in the layout of the game. Where the first two games introduced interesting gameplay quirks, I found that they were useful for perhaps one obstacle before becoming redundant for the rest of the game. Here, each screen is a massive playground, and you're literally given a free licence to use whatever technique you see fit to traverse the screen. Wall banging, neck breaking, magazine dropping ... whatever your fetish is, its yours to exploit here. Also the cutscene set plays surpass that of the already excellent MGS2 and Gamecube MGS:Twin Snakes. Plus fans of the series so far will smile at seeing the origins of the likes of Revolver Ocelot and the Metal Gear project.
So far I've clocked in at about 22hours of gameplay, about 3 times what it took to take on previous iterations of the game. Add to this the amount of secrets and bonuses there are to find and you've got a bit of replay value stuck into the package.
I find it hard to pick a favourite between the series so far, I find that each has its merits. Personally I think the game has now reached its peak in its current form. Perhaps a new platform and a fresh gameplay mechanic will see Snake further himself in the Metal Gear saga. The PS2 occasionally creaks along with the amount of detail on screen and those of you who know the frustration of attempting to cross a screen having to continually switch to first person view to make sure you don't blunder into a bad dude will also be wanting a change in gameplay.
A good game, perhaps a slightly shake gameplay mechanic initially, but you will be blown away by the closing scenes.


Solid Steel Presents Amon Tobin
Solid Steel Presents Amon Tobin
Price: £11.68

3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Wonderful dark breaks, 20 Aug. 2005
Amon Tobin stands out in the Ninja Tune catalogue as something thats just a bit different. Where most of the vibe of Ninja tends to come from the happy and funky influence of the Good Ship Hip Hop, Amon tends to lean towards dark chemical beats from the Ghost Ship Drum & Bass. This mix goes some way towards explaining where his own heavy beats are derived from.
Recorded live you get to hear everything on this mix, whoops of crowd appreciation, little slips here and there, but (thankfully) recorded so well that you don't lose any definition with the sound as is so easy and vital not to do with our modern beats and breaks. The live mix style instantly gives this mix a sense of excitement as Amon begins weaving together dark, clanking, industrial hip hop beats (which wouldn't sound drastically out of place on something like Music For The Jilted Generation). Booming, cavenous sounds which occasionally give way to sinister ambient soundtracky breakdowns. Its when the mix shifts up a gear into very Moving Shadow-eqsue drum and bass, that things get really special. The electronic drum and bass weaves in and out of Amon's own almost fast jazz breaks.
Its such an interesting mix in the Solid Steel series and will stand out for breaking the norm of what has come so far. Its the mix I find closest in spirit in the entire series to that which all are judged against, Coldcut's 70 Minutes of Madness for Journeys By DJs. Snap this up but ensure that the JDJ mix is living in your collection as soon as possible if it is not already.


The Eye Of The World: Book 1 of the Wheel of Time: 1/12
The Eye Of The World: Book 1 of the Wheel of Time: 1/12
by Robert Jordan
Edition: Mass Market Paperback

4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A solid introduction yet worries about the series' future..., 20 Aug. 2005
I do like a bit of fantasy. Many a train journey has seen me devour Lord Of The Rings over and over again, Feist's very trad fantasy of Magician and Darkness At Sethanon were plain ace and Eddings wickedly humorous series were all thoroughly enjoyable. For some reason I had always skirted around Robert Jordan Wheel Of Time series, having been told on many an occasion how fantastic it was I finally had the chance to delve into the daunting 12 book series while on holiday.
What can I say, the initial book left a fantastic impression. The opening is very traditional fantasy, anyone will be right at home with starting out following Rand and his friends simple village life before the inevitable path of destiny sees them all thrown into danger and into frantic flight from certain doom. The characters are all endearing be it the flamboyant and grouchy Thom Merrilin or the mischievous Mat. Not all the characters in our band tend to agree, and frictions usually arise over the use of magic by the taboo Aes Sedai Moriaine who appears to have triggered the danger that follows our lead trio Rand, Mat and Perrin.
The book is well paced, with many a show stopping set piece involving ferocious trollocks or the sinister fades, set against inter party disagreements, tragedy and moments of desperation when our happy bunch end being split. Add to this the continual menace of the overall Dark One who invades our heroes dreams at will and you've got the foundations for a fantastic series.
Or so you would think. The one worrying thing I've heard about this series is that as you get further into it, the books begin to lose their pace and drive, the most worrying comment I've heard from a friend was along the lines of "I've just finished book nine, it didn't really need to be written but still looking forward to book ten". The prospect of forcing myself through 800 pages just to further the story by a step isn't that promising. I found this out for myself once I hit book three, book two kept up the quality of the first well but I found myself being taunted in book three with promising glimmers of story only having to wade through chapters to get some sort of satisfaction. We're not talking the good teasing storytelling here, its the bad 'oh my god, just DO something' variety. So this is perhaps something to consider before embarking on the hugeness of The Wheel Of Time. I'm stopped at book three, I can see myself picking it up again if, say, holiday opportunity arises, but at the moment the wheel stops turning there.


Buffy The Vampire Slayer Complete 1 - 7 Box Set [DVD]
Buffy The Vampire Slayer Complete 1 - 7 Box Set [DVD]

10 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Well worth the £180 price tag, 20 Aug. 2005
You know, I only ever used to catch the odd episode of Buffy on TV. Either it was her having some trauma with Angel or something to do with the rather cold inflicted looking Master. As far as I was concerned it was just a bit of fun, pure standalone episodes, to pass an hour or so of my life away. This was, of course, until I stumbled across someone on an internet forum giving a season by season breakdown of the storylines. I'd never realised the links between each episode, each series, that takes young Buffy from a fashion conscious student at Sunnydale right up to being a General figure leading a bunch of potential slayers into an apocalyptic battle against an almost Lord Of The Rings-esque host of feral vampires and the overal essence of evil in the Hellmouth itself.
So I vowed one day to sit down and watch the entire series from start to finish to take in this epic opus. After finishing it I can say its pure class, the thought that goes into structuring the entire flow of the series. Little throwaway lines that pop up referring to events that may have happened seasons ago, little clues dropped in about the appearence of Dawn in Season 5. There are episodes that are standalone pieces of amusement (take Xander and the 'all women love me' episode for example) or those that tackle more serious aspects of life such as the rather sombre The Body. There are episodes the pushed the boundaries of normal US TV viewing such as the musical Once More With Feeling, the silent Hush and the surreal Restless, all episodes that I will recommend to friends to check out to show that there is more to Buffy than initially perceived.
I found the DVDs to be absolute quality, Season 4 onwards are presented in widescreen which is a bit of a treat. Its also the first time that I've actually wanted to sit down and watch through a commentry, Joss Whedon expanding on the excellent episodes of Hush and Restless for example. There aren't as MANY features as I was expecting and there appears to be a surprising lack of Sarah Michelle-Gellar from the mini docus that punctuate the various boxsets. In defence of this, its a joy to hear Joss expand on the creation of the series where you find he approached Buffy from the mind of a film-maker. Hence the absolute quality of visuals, something you take for granted when you're used to mega-epics like Lord Of The Rings. Perhaps we assume too much that when it comes to TV, everyone has the time and budget to knock up something as impressive as this.
All in all, its a top box set. Something you will, and I have, watch over and over again. The characters are absolutely wonderful and have now become popular culture icons, Buffy will become a piece of history so you should really make sure you own it.


All Out Fall Out
All Out Fall Out
Offered by Qoolist
Price: £0.99

6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Glorious mix of delightful noises, 17 Aug. 2005
This review is from: All Out Fall Out (Audio CD)
It makes you wonder what your ears are going to be in for when you check out the line up of Pest. A hip hop and funk DJ/MC, a quirky techno producer, a sometime trombonist for the Bollywood Brass Band, classically trained cellist, a guitarist ... all the secret ingredients for a what is special serving of aural 'Ninja Stew'. The agenda is quite clearly set out from track one, off kilter electric claps, floor shaking bassline, a repetitive discordant guitar loop ... all rough stuff. Just as you're setting yourself up for the ride, unexpectedly some smooth tromboning is introduced, a slick funky break and its all 'Hey! Hey! Hey! We're on a lively funk tip!'
This big meeting of grand ideas is what makes the music so interesting, all elements smooth rub up against the rawness of hip hop ideology, organic instruments find themselves set off against the wide array of noises that synthland has to offer. Rather than ending up like a chaotic mess, everything gets a moment to shine or complement what is going on in each track. The music is fresh, exciting and ever so slightly cheeky; one in the eye for all of those who believe that all Ninja is about is smoked up head nodding vibes. Pest have the ability to absolutely tear it up live and lift the roof off a venue and every single sparkle of excitement that would expect from that experience is encapsulated on this CD.
So much here to appeal to me on so many levels, my house/dance music foundations love the wicked latino grooves and basslines of Click Bitches, kick starting the imagination of what could be achieved in a house set in this climate of experimentation that is infecting the big jocks. Then we have the likes of Downward Steps's gently cascading keys and Wu Ju's string laden bliss which heads straight for my 'hazy summer' part of my nervous system, an uplifting chilled groove with Pasta delivering lyrics in a refreshingly British way (think Massive Attack rather than Roots Manuva's rough Jamaican style MCing). Flip onto Try Again and it all sounds a bit like the Can Can meets Looney Tunes, while Donde Pesta appeals to my electronica side just nicely.
So yeah, impressed with Pest, this has come along just at the right time where I'm enjoying good lively and funky breaks action. One for checking.


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