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J. Newth "regular reader" (Poole, UK)
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Epson Glossy Photo Paper - 100 x 150 mm - 225 g/m2 - 50 sheet(s)
Epson Glossy Photo Paper - 100 x 150 mm - 225 g/m2 - 50 sheet(s)
Offered by OfficeClearance/OUR-PRICE-20%-UK VAT INCL.
Price: 23.00

5.0 out of 5 stars The best, 23 Dec 2013
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First rate paper, takes the colours and all the detail required. This means that higher spec paper costing more is not needed. Incredibly cheap at this price at Amazon (compared with all the competitors I have come across).


My African Journey. With plates, including portraits, and with a map
My African Journey. With plates, including portraits, and with a map
by Winston Churchill
Edition: Unknown Binding

4.0 out of 5 stars A historical document, 23 Dec 2013
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A short piece of history this is Winston Churchill's description of a journey of the then recently built Mombasa to Uganda railway (what a feat of engineering!). Perceptive and amusing: quite short and not a weighty read.


Elizabeth Barrett Browning: A Biography
Elizabeth Barrett Browning: A Biography
by Margaret Forster
Edition: Paperback

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great Biography, 8 Dec 2012
First: two of the Reviews offered alongside this refer to the book of Elizabeth Barrett poems, and not the biography of her written by Margaret Forster.
Then: I have read a good number of biographies of the great British Poets from Wordsworth onwards: top of the list is probably Holmes' two volume biography of Samuel Taylor Coleridge. This present biography by Forster is a wonderful read and runs it close. It doesn't take long to get into, and once 'into it', it was extremely difficult to put down. The story of Elizabeth's rejection by her father and brothers when she secretly meets and then marries Robert Browning is a withering one. The extraordinary love Robert and Elizabeth had for each other - real and tested by often deep differences of opinion - is almost too good to be true. Quite obviously one of the greatest love stories of all time. Most of us will know the ending but the journey there is an utterly moving one.
I like the fullness of the indexing and the ease with which one can be reminded of 'who is who' in the vast cast list of relatives and friends - essential but not always there in all such works.


Africa's World War: Congo, the Rwandan Genocide, and the Making of a Continental Catastrophe
Africa's World War: Congo, the Rwandan Genocide, and the Making of a Continental Catastrophe
by Gerard Prunier
Edition: Paperback

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Africa's ongoing tagedy, 14 Oct 2012
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I bought this book from Amazon.com and submitted my review to the American web site, edited a lttle, as follows;-

Having worked in Rwanda for 7 years at the beginning of the Habyarimana regime, around 1970, I did not make a return visit until 2007 since when I have made three visits, most recently in January 2012. It is now a vibrant country, seemingly at ease with itself. What is also impressive is the number of 'Returnees' who are settling in Rwanda, some, such as one Anglican Bishop, from Mbarara in Uganda - to where his grandparents had emigrated 3 or 4 generations back - long before 1959. We met others returning from from Kenya whose exit also long predated the later Genocide.
That is one measure of the progress now being made in Rwanda.
Recently I have read both Gerard Pruinier's first book on the Rwanda Genocide and now this mammoth work on the Congo Crisis and its Pan-African implications. Like many of your reviewers I found it hard going but rewarding. My constant need to return to the meaning of all the abbreviations Prunier employs, even made me wonder if I was beginning to suffer from dementia, but I was reassured by being not the only one with the same experience! The maps are inadequate and Google Maps had to be constantly at hand to check just where places such as Ituri, are.
Part of the difficulty for me was to realise for the first time the full extent of Rwanda's involvement in the Congo Wars and how far, geographically, Rwanda went in pursuit.
So, a very difficult read but richly rewarding. Some observers have written that it is one sided and relies too heavily on personsal interviews which cannot be verified. But the book's importance is best gauged if it is seen as the making of a powerful case against the actions of the Rwandan regime, rather than a final judgement upon it. Such a judgement will come eventually but not yet.
One relatively minor point: in the second third of the book Prunier promised to write about President Kagame's change of focus from his excursions into Congo towards the need to concentrate on the reconstruction and development of Rwanda - around 2003-4. This topic did not get raised again, and I missed his assessment of present day Rwanda.


The Quality of Mercy
The Quality of Mercy
by Barry Unsworth
Edition: Hardcover
Price: 15.77

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars High Quality, 13 Jun 2012
This review is from: The Quality of Mercy (Hardcover)
This review is prompted by Barry Unsworth's death at the age of 81.
I have enjoyed all his books from 'Sacred Hunger' onwards, having found some of his earlier output, particularly 'The Hide' rather unpleaseant. I had not appreciated how highly he was regarded by a wide readership, it being rather difficult to find his books displayed on the shelves of Waterstones for instance.
Of all his books my personal favourite had been 'Morality Play', but 'The Quality of Mercy' I have now found most rewarding of all. It is astonishing that it has been penned by an 80 year old. It is wide-ranging, concise, and its complexity is carefully controlled. All its numerous characters spring to life on the page.
In many respects it is a final homecoming for Barry Unsworth, because the action of the novel, set in literally takes one from London in the 1760s to the Minefields of Durham, where the author grew up. And it is there that the problem of children being forced to work underground in great danger, so having their childhood abruptly curtailed, is depicted and condemned - every bit as serious a type of slavery as that portrayed both here and in Sacred Hunger.
A wonderful way to say 'Good-bye'!


Africa United [DVD]
Africa United [DVD]
Dvd ~ Roger Nsengiyumva
Offered by skyvo-direct
Price: 2.46

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Seriously funny, 6 Jun 2011
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This review is from: Africa United [DVD] (DVD)
Having spent not a few years of my life in Rwanda, and visited twice in the last few years my viewpoint for this film may be different from most other viewers.
It is a Road Movie that follows a 'fantasy' journey of 5 young Rwandans as they make a trip from Ruhengeri in Rwanda to South Africa to take a part promised to one of them in the opening ceremony of the 2010 World Cup. Its substance is that each of these youngsters exemplifies one of the major problems facing young people in Rwanda's recovery from the 1994 Genocide - HIV/AIDs, Child soldiering, Child prostitution etc.
It swings along through stunning African scenery. The writing is witty - the lines of the young 'Manager' being full of witty errors of phrasing, some of which are difficult to follow.
Opinion has been divided about the film's merit, several expert reviewers being entirely dismissive,on the grounds of naivety. I would say 'Good for a laugh' with an undercurrent of deep seriousness - 'Message received.'


Michelin Green Guide: Ile de France (Green tourist guides)
Michelin Green Guide: Ile de France (Green tourist guides)
by Michelin Travel Publications
Edition: Paperback

4.0 out of 5 stars Still a great guide, 6 Jun 2011
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This is the 1989 Michelin Guide - in the older format. As an informative guide book it remains supremely helpful for visits to France - so long as you are not relying on it to provide relevant opening times etc. A much better guide book than newer editions.


Westland Plant Rescue Ready to Use Bug Killer for Fruit and Vegetables 750ml
Westland Plant Rescue Ready to Use Bug Killer for Fruit and Vegetables 750ml

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars It worked, 6 Jun 2011
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Actually, I bought this item, by mistake, instead of Westland's alternative Product for Plants and Flowers. I needed to kill Orange Lily Bugs on my garden lilies.

To my surprise and joy it eradicated the lily bugs in one application.


Shelley: The Pursuit
Shelley: The Pursuit
by Richard Holmes
Edition: Paperback
Price: 10.49

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars In the wake of the Pursuit, 7 Mar 2011
This review is from: Shelley: The Pursuit (Paperback)
First a warning. The 2005 Harper Perennial re-issue has 735 pages of small and slightly blurred print to read, and those wishing to purchase Richard Holmes' evergreen biography may wish to look for an earlier second hand edition of it.

The book itself, as others have written here, is likely to haunt the memory and lead one to pursue other connected avenues and explore subsidary characters further.
The great thing is that Holmes tells the story as it was, leaving one to reach one's own conclusions about the man and his work. To me, the tragedy of Shelley's life was not just in the way it ended but in the way it was lived. A fervent believer in free love he certainly put his beliefs into practice with devastating effect. Broken lives, suicides, childhood deaths and general unhappiness followed in his wake. Yet here was a man who was years and years ahead of his time in actively seeking the dignity of all people. From his own point of view, Shelley's tragedy was that his poetry and his writings remained virtually unpublished and therefore unappreciated throughout his life. Forced into exile, pursued by debt, he he was left at the mercy of unreliable friends in England who by and large ignored the work sent to them for publication.

Holmes, however, leaves the reader to draw such conclusions as he or she wills. That is to me its strongest point and explains why, now 37 years old, this book is not going to age. Quite an achievement.


Now My Eyes Have Seen You: Justice, Mercy and Legal Institutions (New Studies in Biblical Theology)
Now My Eyes Have Seen You: Justice, Mercy and Legal Institutions (New Studies in Biblical Theology)
by Robert Fyall
Edition: Paperback

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Delving into the world of Job, 14 Feb 2011
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For most of us the Book of Job starts with interest but by the middle has become a bore, picking up eventually to a rousing conclusion. The story of Job is embedded deep in our British culture, perhaps most tellingly so in Blake's illustrations and the musical rendering of these by Vaughan Williams.
What Fyall does in this 200 page monograph, the fruits of years of study, is to open up the book of Job and make it meaningful throughout the length of its seemingly interminasble discourses.
Modern archaeology has shown how the 'Job poet' as Fyall entitles him, wrote in response to the current mythology of his day at the time of Baal worship in ancient Canaan. Rather in the way that Augustine absorbed the philosophy of Plato and transformed into a Christian 'story', and as Aquinas did the same to Aristotle, so, Fyall argues, the 'Job poet' took the then current Pagan mythologies concerning Behemoth (Mot the god of death) and Leviathan (the crocodile. symbolic of the Satan) and absorbed them into Jewish Wisdom.
This may all sound rather academic, but in following Fyall's interpretation, we find that Job is not only tackling the problem of 'Evil' but adding a new 'explanation' of the account in Genesis chapter 1 of how our of our world came into being. In Genesis we have a world created when Light shone into Darkness, and when Land was separated out from the raging Sea - with its overtones of cataclysmic power and destructiveness.
Bring this forward to our day and we can begin to understand that the suffering we experience - whether due to tragedy or to evil - has its origins within the creative process by which our universe was made. As yet we have not experienced the 'full drawing out of the power of Leviathan', and we remain unable to decipher the hand of God as Lord in our many tragedies. (We need only to pause over the power of repeated Tsunamis to connect at this point). But, or so we may hope, 'All manner of things shall be well'.
Giving stars is not to my taste, but 4 rather than 5 is merely an acknowledgement that it takes a while before one gets hooked by the contents of this important book.


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