Shop now Shop now Shop now  Up to 70% Off Fashion  Shop all Amazon Fashion Cloud Drive Photos Shop now Learn More Shop now Shop now Shop Fire Shop Kindle Shop now Shop now
Profile for thebigalabama > Reviews

Personal Profile

Content by thebigalabama
Top Reviewer Ranking: 759,931
Helpful Votes: 19

Learn more about Your Profile.

Reviews Written by
thebigalabama

Show:  
Page: 1 | 2
pixel
Offshore Banking 101: How to Keep Your Money Safe and Secure in the World's Best Tax Havens
Offshore Banking 101: How to Keep Your Money Safe and Secure in the World's Best Tax Havens
Price: £2.59

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Totally useless. It is so thin I read it from ..., 4 Feb. 2016
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Totally useless. It is so thin I read it from front to back in ten minutes - literally, ten minutes. There are no insights, no useful details, and no sense that the author is any sort of specialist on the subject. It comprises nothing more than mundane comments and statements of the obvious. If I had been asked to write down what little I already knew on the subject i could have done better than this over my lunch break. I learned nothing of any use from this ridiculous pamphlet.


How to make yourself invisible to the tax inspector
How to make yourself invisible to the tax inspector
by Iven De Hoon
Edition: Paperback
Price: £11.92

2.0 out of 5 stars The translation into English is so poor it makes it a slog to get through each ..., 6 Aug. 2015
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
I regret paying over £11 for this paperback. The translation into English is so poor it makes it a slog to get through each page.


Cherry: A Life of Apsley Cherry-Garrard
Cherry: A Life of Apsley Cherry-Garrard
Price: £7.99

1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Good enough, but not more than a 3 star read., 26 Nov. 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
An enjoyable read overall, but too many flights of fancy and irrelevant comments. Do we really have to have the flora and fauna scene-setting every time we go somewhere. Flowers doing this, birds, clouds and trees doing that; and in any case how could she know?
A juvenile and gratuitous comment about Kitchener was distracting and i got the impression from other asides that she is a voluble socialist. I may be wrong but that was the impression. I enjoyed it but am unlikely to return to it - and I was glad to reach the end.


The Worst Journey In The World (Vintage Classics)
The Worst Journey In The World (Vintage Classics)
Price: £8.99

5.0 out of 5 stars The Best, 26 Nov. 2014
The best adventure story ever written - and beautifully written, too.


Breakout: The Great Prison Escapes (The Great Escapes Book 2)
Breakout: The Great Prison Escapes (The Great Escapes Book 2)
Price: £0.99

1.0 out of 5 stars Lightweight, 3 April 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This is a shallow, lightweight book. There are too many mistakes which are distracting to the reader, showing a lack of simple research. For instance, he says the famous head of the FBI was Herbert Hoover. The prose is IVth form essay level.


Dominion
Dominion
by C. J. Sansom
Edition: Paperback
Price: £5.84

6 of 9 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Preposterous, 8 Oct. 2013
This review is from: Dominion (Paperback)
What a deep disappointment this undemanding book turned out to be. The central driving premise (the conversation between Frank and Edgar) is preposterous from every angle. Just one example: instead of listening to the whole, detailed scientific explanation from Edgar and then losing his mind as it came to a close, surely Frank would have put his fingers in his ears from the start and hopped around the room singing 'la la la, not listening, la la'. Sansom lost me at this point and I knew I had wasted £3.85p (Sainsbury's).

The characters are grey and poorly drawn. For instance, the image I got of Geoff was just a misty outline with a short barking laugh (a description of this habit is irritatingly repeated). The only character I managed to visualise early on was the cliched, Glaswegian communist Ben, who I could only picture as Fulton Mackay for some reason. The remainder of the cast I had to work out for myself; such as Stephen Mackintosh for Frank and a blond Charles Laughton for Gunther. Jackson was James Robertson Justice and Natalia remained an elusive pair of eyes.

I persevered because I started to enjoy picking holes in the plot. Over several weeks the entire network uses the same password - Aztec. Laughable. Even the American submarine is ok with just that one word which had already been deployed the length of the country every time someone cracked open a front door. How can a submarine lie undetected on the surface only one mile offshore, while David can identify Natalia on the cliff-top through a pair of binoculars from a rowing boat out at sea?

The escape through the cordon in London, executed by the fire brigade, is straight from the realms of "and with one mighty bound they were free". If the fire engine wasn't allowed inside the cordon, but one of the crew could guide the three escapees past the police and onto the back of it from inside the cordon, then why couldn't they have just walked past it themselves and disappear into the murk? In any case, if you can't escape through the streets of New Cross in the midst of the thickest smog ever to hit London, at night, then you have no business being in the Resistance.

Perhaps the best laugh-out-loud moment came when - having been captured and restrained on the beach, but before anyone is tied up with Gunther's loose bits of wire (why no handcuffs, by the way?) - the team are then treated to a lengthy explanation by Gunther as to how it has all been done, like Goldfinger telling Bond the whole fiendish plot just before he escapes. I could go on.

My biggest problem with this book was the relentless, subversive political message from CJ Sansom. I got the feeling that the characters from real life, Churchill, Powell, Beaverbrook and the rest, could have been drawn up by a committee of ex-Guardian writers recently sacked for being too socialist.

I have read Winter in Madrid and enjoyed all of the Shardlake novels, especially the triumphant Dissolution, but, regrettably, it is now time to say goodbye to CJ Sansom and goodbye to Matthew Shardlake. The spell has been broken.
Comment Comment (1) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Oct 25, 2013 4:48 PM BST


The Fort
The Fort
by Bernard Cornwell
Edition: Paperback
Price: £8.83

5.0 out of 5 stars Entertaining history, 22 Jun. 2011
This review is from: The Fort (Paperback)
This is a superb way to learn and enjoy military history. The author has bult his book around established and carefully researched facts. He explains any liberties taken with the truth at the end of the story and they are minor details only. The pace builds up nicely after establishing the characters and developing the background to this previously obscure military and naval campaign. The last 100 pages are as exciting as any thriller and there are no loose ends. Besides being a very satisfying read it is also good instruction for any young officer, showing critical tactical and command errors made by the rebels, and brilliant crisis management in the field by the outnumbered British Army and Royal Navy. I think this book will significantly increase the tourist industry in Castine, Maine, USA (read it and you'll see why, and want to visit yourself.)


The 33
The 33
by Jonathan Franklin
Edition: Hardcover

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Loose ends, 11 May 2011
This review is from: The 33 (Hardcover)
It was OK, but the whole book had a feel of having been rushed to get into print before anyone else. One annoying loose end was when he said that an earlier search, by the mine-rescue team who eventually led them out, had forgotten to bring the A-frame used to lower a wire directly above the entry hole in order to pull people out. He said this was to have serious consequences for one of the team later, but he never goes back to it.

I felt all the way through that there would be similar loose ends because of the rush to print, and it put me on edge. I would have liked it better if he had waited and done more follow up research before going to publication. A revision of this otherwise entertaining book, in a year or so, will be worth reading when further information becomes available. More information and pictures of the rescuers (and perhaps fewer of the author)would have been appreciated, along with what happened to them (awards etc) afterwards. They were key players in this amazing event.


Beware of the Dog: Rugby's Hard Man Reveals All
Beware of the Dog: Rugby's Hard Man Reveals All
by Brian Moore
Edition: Paperback
Price: £6.78

2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Good Stuff, 11 May 2011
I thought the revelations about abuse in the opening chapters were perhaps over-egged in the publicity for the book. The book as a whole was very readable and I raced through it all, enjoying every page. Good stuff.


Heresy
Heresy
by S. J. Parris
Edition: Paperback
Price: £5.19

5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Just OK, 11 May 2011
This review is from: Heresy (Paperback)
Not bad, but not as good as the reviews on the cover suggest. There was no pace or tension, no feeling of wanting to stay awake late reading it, no page-turning imperative. Absolutely not in the same league as CJ Sansom. Just OK.


Page: 1 | 2