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Ruben Hoggaglust (United Kingdom)

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The Eye 2 [DVD]
The Eye 2 [DVD]
Dvd ~ Qi Shu
Offered by A2Z Entertains
Price: 3.29

0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Not as good as it should be (spoilers!!!), 3 Sep 2007
This review is from: The Eye 2 [DVD] (DVD)
Given the (in part) deserved hype of The Eye, The Eye 2 struggles not to be eclipsed by its predecessor, a movie which - in its first half at least - had more genuine creepiness and shocks than most Hollywood 'Horror' films have throughout their entire run time.

Not content to keep within the boundries of the first movie, the Pang brothers bravely look elsewhere for their gateway to the world of ghosts. Here, we are told, attempted suicide is a grave sin and is the reason for our heroine's new found ability to commune with the dead. This coincides (conveniently) with ghosts using pregnant women as conduits to rebirth, and guess what, yup, our heroine just happens to be 'with child'. In itself, this is not such a crazy idea, however, what ruins this film is the writer's insistence on giving the ghosts a 'motive' a reason for being...

The Eye worked because the spirits were genuinely creepy; hanging around in normal places, doing the kind of stuff they did in their physical lives, but in such a way as they seemed lost, frustrated or even malevolent, combined with the often bizarre appearance of many of these spirits, the Pang's offered a truly disturbing picture of life after death and presented the protagonist (and audience) with some very effective and disturbing imagery. Here, we have a central theme of the heroine being pregnant, and seeing ghosts who use pregnancy as a means to be reborn, resulting in copious hospital scenes accompanied by our heroine in a continuous state of advanced histrionics. This is often quite irritating and to boot, the ghosts just plain aren't scary.

I appreciate that the Eye, for all it's faults towards the end, was at least a 'complete' story, and therefore a true sequel would have been very difficult. So the Pang's have to be given some credit for giving the franchise a new lease of life, but maybe here it's just too 'bogged down' in silly plot ideas to work effectively. When the Pang's do stick to the original formula; (the wierd ghost in the taxi, the 'loud voice' at the bus stop etc) the scares seem copyist, forced and don't fit with the motives of the rest of the movie. In fact the only really effective scares are the kind of cheap sound induced 'jump out of your set' scares that you expect from lesser directors.

The Eye 2 has plenty of atmosphere and the visual flair that you'd come to expect from the Pang brothers, and at least 1 truly shocking sequence... however if you were a fan of the Original, don't expect more of the same, because you will be disappointed. If you are a non-fan, leave well alone.


Bond Remastered - The Spy Who Loved Me (1-disc) [DVD] [1977]
Bond Remastered - The Spy Who Loved Me (1-disc) [DVD] [1977]
Dvd ~ Roger Moore
Offered by skyvo-direct
Price: 4.92

5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Nobody Does It Better, 13 Aug 2007
Generally accepted as THE best Bond film ever, The Spy Who Loved me has everything you could come to expect from a great Bond movie. The script is a model for all the great Bond movies, as stated in another review here, 'borrowing' elements from earlier movies. A moot point really, as all Bond films use a pretty much identical formula anyway, it's just here, it all comes together so smoothly. A great cast, reserved but non-the-less charismatic Bond Girl, a superbly over the top henchman in the shape of Jaws, a suitably hammy turn by Curt Jurgens as the webfingered Stromberg, some (for their time) great special effects and perhaps the best Bond Theme ever composed; (although the rest of the soundtrack is ok, John Barry's magic-touch is sadly missing here).

Superb and exotic locations and some fantastic action sequences (particularly involing the Lotus Esprit - I want that car!!) definitely make this an essential part of your DVD collection.
Comment Comment (1) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Mar 19, 2011 8:51 PM GMT


Moonraker [DVD]
Moonraker [DVD]
Dvd ~ Roger Moore
Offered by best_value_entertainment
Price: 3.82

4 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Sheer escapist fantasy and good fun to boot, 13 Aug 2007
This review is from: Moonraker [DVD] (DVD)
Like The Man With The Golden Gun, Moonraker is often unfairly criticised for its excess of fantasy and introduction of some comedy elements that many feel have no place in a bond movie. Admittedly, there are occasions where the comedy is, perhaps a little overstated; (the Tarzan yell in Octopussy anyone?)however, bond films are not about serious representation of covert spy missions, instead - in their heyday at least, they are about pure escapist fantasy, and Moonraker succeeds in providing this by the bucket load. From the quirky dialogue, to the stunning locations, stunts and special effects, Moonraker broke the mould and was to remain the highest grossing Bond Movie of all time until 1995's Goldeneye.
Moonraker has it's flaws, but in terms of entertainment alone, it is perhaps one of the best Bond films ever. There's barely a let up in the action, there are some great 'how will he get out of that?' sequences - namley the 'Astronaught Training' g-force simulator, which thanks to some great editing is a genuinely tense piece of cinema. There are several set pieces, including a record breaking (pun intended) fight in a glass museum, but the most thrilling have to be the sequences in space, with some truly convincing special effects, models and minatures which just goes to show that you don't need CGI for everything!

Disliked by so called Bond Purists for all the reasons that make this film as entertaining as it is. Indulgent in almost every aspect, Moonraker might not be the most cerebral of the Bond canon, but for a couple of hours of unadulterated fun, you can't beat it.


Bond Remastered - Live And Let Die (1-disc) [DVD] [1973]
Bond Remastered - Live And Let Die (1-disc) [DVD] [1973]
Dvd ~ Roger Moore
Price: 5.36

1 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars The name's Bland, James Bland, 13 Aug 2007
Not the most inspiring start, this film was the last of the 'cheap' looking Bond movies synonymous with the 1960s, before Roger Moore's era ushered in a sleeker, more expensive looking package.

Many elements which are included in this film were, at the time, fairly risky, but the plot concerning poppy fields and a fake voodoo curse gives rise to some scenes that seem somewhat 'out of place' in a James Bond film. There are several effective scenes, notably the boat chase and the scene where Bond escapes the advances of some hungry crocs, but all in all there's something amiss from this entry in the series.


Bond Remastered - The Man With The Golden Gun (1-disc) [DVD] [1974]
Bond Remastered - The Man With The Golden Gun (1-disc) [DVD] [1974]
Dvd ~ Roger Moore
Offered by WorldCinema
Price: 3.87

2 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A great slice of 70's kitch, 13 Aug 2007
Being a fan of all the James Bond films starring Roger Moore; (the quintessential Bond in my humble opinion) I am more than aware that this film gets a blasting by many so called Bond fans. True, the film was rushed into production following Moore's successful debut in Live and Let Die, and this shows in the lack of elaborate sets and minimal cast. There's also the 'fluff' (and, frankly pointless)subplot concerning a 'Solex Agitator' and a (then toical) energy 'crisis'. However, the central plot surrounding Scaramanga and Bond is classic stuff. Christopher Lee is a legendary villain, and portrays Scaramanga with considerable aplomb, Herve Villechaize is a suitably 'bizzare' sidekick, Britt Ekland is, well, Britt Ekland, but her ditsy blonde is balanced nicely by Maud Adams's distant, cool performance as Scaramanga's tormented lover. The locations are lush and exotic, and John Barry's score is suitably oriental and high-octane. The stunts, such as they are, are low-key affairs, however, the 'car over the bridge' stunt has become a classic in its own right, as has the eponymous Golden Gun itself. Sure there's Kung Fu, sure there's Sheriff J. W. Pepper and sure there's the filthiest, brassiest Bond theme ever, but this was 1974!

All in all, some silly moments in a Bond film that has many classic elements. Great fun.


Red Shoes [2007] [DVD]
Red Shoes [2007] [DVD]
Dvd ~ Hye-Su Kim
Offered by A2Z Entertains
Price: 6.99

6 of 9 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Disappointing, looks great, fails to scare., 13 Aug 2007
This review is from: Red Shoes [2007] [DVD] (DVD)
As something of an avid collector of Asian Horror, I approached this release with some hope, having read a number of favorable reviews. Sadly, this title disappointed me. I love my horror films to be well filmed, with arty, intelligent direction, good character development and competent acting. Being rather old fashioned, I also like them to be frightening, and whilst The Red Shoes has the former ingredients in spades, it is sadly lacking in the fear department.

Whilst the subject matter of cursed shoes is handled stylishly, in hindsight, I'm just not sure how frightening the concept of haunted footwear really is. The film is also extremely slow moving, with too many episodes of female histrionics and pointless flashbacks which attempt to explain why the eponymous red shoes have the effect they have by revealing their long (and rather dull) history.

The Red Shoes desperately wants to be a classy, cut above horror film, sadly, the director is so busy trying hard to achieve this, he forgot one major, and rather essential ingredient - fear.


The Eye (Collector's Edition) [DVD]
The Eye (Collector's Edition) [DVD]
Dvd ~ Angelica Lee
Offered by DVDBayFBA
Price: 6.72

2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A film of two halves, 13 Aug 2007
I discovered Asian horror with the DVD release of the much hyped 'Ring', and earnestly began to build a collection of films that injected (much needed) new life into a genre that had practically been killed off by 20 or so years of trashy, ineffectual American slasher flicks.

Whilst not always successful, Asian horror films at least treated the genre with respect and intelligence, where brooding atmospheres were the foundation of under you skin scares, not a disfigured serial murderer or drop of fake blood in sight.

The Eye is an odd film, in that it represents both the best and worst of Asian horror, and due to failings in the latter half of the movie, is not quite the classic that many reviewers make out. What makes many Asian horror movies so deliciously creepy is the lack of obvious explanations to the terrible events that take place - fear of the unknown is afterall, perhaps the darkest fear of all. Through non-linear storytelling and editing, films like Audition, The Ring, The Grudge et al have jarring, disturbing quality, and loose strings are often left untied, leaving the viewer with much to think about long after the end titles have rolled. The first half of the Eye does this perfectly.

To represent our heroine's far from perfect eyesight follwing a cornea transplant, the Pang brothers present us with a view of Mun's world... a world inhabited by shadowy figures, blurred and distorted faces, rooms whose features change spontaneously during the night... all in all, a confusing and not altogether attractive place. And we, the audience are right there with her. The premise is immediately obvious, following the transplant, our heroine can now see ghosts, but the flair with which these spectres are revealed to us is such that The Eye delivers more genuine scares in it's first 45 minutes than most horror films deliver througout, and therein lies the problem... The Eye does so much in its opening scenes, that there is nowhere for the remainder of film to go, other than on a very pedestrain and, dare I say, boring 'investiagtion' sub-plot, where our heroine must discover who her cornea donor was and why she now sees the things she does. After such a great start, the rest of the film goes rapidly downhill, not because it is 'bad', but because The Eye promises early on to be a veritable fright-fest, and the latter 50% of the movie is totally devoid of any scares.

If you are new to Asian horror, and are looking to build your collection, The Eye is an absolute must, even if the last half of the movie is a somewhat tiresome 'Ring' style detective story;(with a rather cheesy 'Hollywood' ending), there are enough effective and genuinely creepy scares in the first three quarters of an hour to satisfy the most hardened horror buff.


Whistle And I'll Come To You (BBC Ghost Story For Christmas) [1968] [DVD]
Whistle And I'll Come To You (BBC Ghost Story For Christmas) [1968] [DVD]
Dvd ~ Michael Hordern
Offered by classicmovies2000
Price: 29.70

13 of 17 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Not for the faint hearted, or intellectually challenged!, 13 Aug 2007
Slow, almost ponderous direction takes the viewer on a terrifying journey in which almost nothing actually happens, but that succeeds for those with the patience and imagination to interpret the subtleties of deft storytelling and expert film-making. Definitely will not appeal to people used to 'paint by numbers' horror films, where the audience are treated to a series of shlock 'scares'; (usually provided by a group of half naked, dumb American teeagers holidaying in a log cabin, in the middle of a forest inhabilted by a knife weilding nutcase with a penchant for slaughtering half naked, dumb American teenagers)... only for their intelligence to be further insulted by a patronising denoument in which an already contrived storyline is explained in detail.

This film exists on a different level, where it sits in limited, but priviledged company with that rarest of beasts - the 'Genuinely' creepy horror film. The lack of dialogue, action, special effects, music, half naked dumb American teenagers etc etc makes for a refreshingly unique and deeply disturbing study of lonliness that climaxes in a truly disturibing series of images; (and sounds) that stay with the viewer long after the end titles roll. I originally saw this on BBC 1 when I was 16... and I've never looked at a blanket the same way since!
Any fans of modern Asian horror will appreciate this film, and recogonise that much of the so called 'modern' (and lauded) technique of slowburn atmospherics owes more than a passing nod to this truly chilling classic.


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