Profile for Coco Kemp-Welch > Reviews

Personal Profile

Content by Coco Kemp-Welch
Top Reviewer Ranking: 447,895
Helpful Votes: 33

Learn more about Your Profile.

Reviews Written by
Coco Kemp-Welch

Show:  
Page: 1
pixel
The News: A User's Manual
The News: A User's Manual
by Alain de Botton
Edition: Hardcover
Price: £9.13

15 of 18 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Clever, insightful and surprisingly funny, 6 Feb 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
I thought this was a clever, insightful and at times surprisingly funny guide to the modern media. De Botton looks at things differently and helps de-construct this messy world and challenges our pre-conceptions about it. And not in a boring "media studies" way. No doubt reviewers from the media will not like being on the receiving end of his intelligence and humour but ignore them, this is a fascinating and clever read.
Comment Comment (1) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Mar 3, 2014 7:45 AM GMT


Religion for Atheists: A non-believer's guide to the uses of religion
Religion for Atheists: A non-believer's guide to the uses of religion
by Alain de Botton
Edition: Hardcover

13 of 19 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Brilliant book, 26 Jan 2012
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This is a brilliant book, written with style and intelligence. De Botton's crisp writing deftly brings insight and illumination and is an entertaining and thought provoking read. Highly recommended.


Pub Walks in Underhill Country
Pub Walks in Underhill Country
by Nat Segnit
Edition: Paperback

5 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Very funny and interesting too - well worth reading, 14 Mar 2011
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This is a very funny book. The narrator, Graham Underhill, is deliciously unreliable. His inability to see the reality of his marriage to the gorgeous but mercilessly fickle Sunita creates some brilliantly funny scenes - I was in stitches. The rambles get increasingly shambolic (and bonkers) as Graham struggles with his situation (I don't want to say too much and spoil it) yet by the end it was moving and rather heart breaking. In between the revelations of his life there are fascinating bits of information on very diverse topics. Nat Segnit writes beautifully and poetically in places, so even though Graham is (intentionally) a sad nerd, he is a poetic, educated one too. It really was a good read. I recommend highly.


Page: 1