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boatdrinks47@hotmail.com (Sunny London)

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Ubik (S.F. MASTERWORKS)
Ubik (S.F. MASTERWORKS)
by Philip K. Dick
Edition: Paperback
Price: 7.27

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Ingenious story. Thoroughly absorbing and an good read., 17 Aug 2001
I found this book when I was searching for "..Androids.." in my campus library- I failed to pick out Androids, so I went for Ubik, and the rest, as they say, is history. I was aware that Dick had written the novel that had become "Bladerunner", but until reading Ubik, I had no idea that he was such an influence on sci-fi (and more besides). For the Dick beginner (as I was), Ubik was an excellent, fulfilling read, and now that I've really got into Dick (impossible not to!) I can see how reading more of his stories only adds to his power, and indeed to the satisfaction for the reader. Even though I'm not huge on sci-fi, Ubik had everyting I wanted: a great plot; an absorbing vision of the future; mystery; abstraction (eg. being sued by a door!); and it's so easy to want to read it again and again. Definitely a book to build your own library around.


Soldier Talk
Soldier Talk
by Simon Cullen
Edition: Paperback

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The Mecca of Military Linguistics, 16 Dec 2000
This review is from: Soldier Talk (Paperback)
The standing ovations should never end for Mr. Cullen, for producing such a definitve article on the essence of "squaddie lingo". The army has a culture all of its own and its beliefs, morality, approach to life, and its dogged durability is very much encapsulated in its own language, to which only past and present members are privy.
Simon Cullen has brought together a dictionary of phrases which would provoke laughter among even the most conservative elements of society (although not all of the the time), and the book is a must-read, even for those who have no interest whatsoever in what the Army does or says, purely because it shows just how much the English language can be bent and manipulated, and still remain recognisably English. Congrats Mr Cullen; a fine job, and I especially enjoyed the defeinition of REMFs!


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