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Accelerate [Int'L Jewelcase]
Accelerate [Int'L Jewelcase]
Offered by best_value_entertainment
Price: £3.03

4.0 out of 5 stars Good stuff, 13 April 2008
Five seconds into "Living well" and I'm happy. It's a solid sound that harks back to early albums and it's R.E.M. doing what they do. But what do I know? I loved "New Adventures in Hi Fi".


The English at Table
The English at Table
by Digby C. Anderson
Edition: Hardcover
Price: £13.11

4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Spot on., 6 April 2008
This review is from: The English at Table (Hardcover)
This book made me laugh out loud and that's more than you can say for most other food books I've read. Politically incorrect, pretentious, offensive, witty and absolutely spot on the nose.

Unfortunately there are far too many home truths here for most English "cooks" to handle and so I am sure that this book will be ill received. A nation of food haters, that's us. Just look at all the gushing reviews for Delia's "How to Cheat..." book if you don't believe me.

The highlight has to be Anderson's airline picnic. One day I will do that. Oh yes.


Delia's How to Cheat at Cooking
Delia's How to Cheat at Cooking
by Delia Smith
Edition: Hardcover
Price: £16.00

19 of 36 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Cheating? Yeah, that sums it up., 26 Mar 2008
Using ready-grated cheddar and mozzarella isn't cheating: it's laughable. Using frozen chickpeas to make "hoo-moose" isn't a shortcut: it's misguided. Using ready-shaved parmesan from a big plastic tub isn't a time saver: it's offensive on many levels. Delia's latest "recipe" book is one step away from the instructions on the back of a ready meal packet and is an affront to anyone who enjoys food, whether a competent cook or not.

The book and the series are Delia's belated, cheerless and desperate attempt to reinvent herself. It's doubly desperate when the only USP that she and her gang of food stylists could think of was to use canned and frozen food and claim that this would help people who can't cook or who don't have time. To sell this conceit Delia builds one absurd straw man after another, claiming for example that you have to soak dried chickpeas for 24 hours and then boil them for a further two. Even if this were true, has she not come across the tinned variety? You sometimes see them in supermarkets - maybe M&S had run out when she visited. Of course tinned chickpeas are cheaper and keep longer than the frozen ones, but the Grand Harpy Dementor of Cooking never lets facts and practicality get in the way of self-centred promotion.

The egregious lifestyle sections of her show are the ersatz icing on the frozen mash cake. Stuff your god and stuff your footie Delia (with dried Sage and Onion Paxo no doubt). I switched on to see a food programme, not "Songs of Praise" meets "MOTD" meets "Aren't I Very Rich and Popular?" Ultimately though, it's the recipes/assembly instructions that disappoint. In reality the few minutes saved result in substandard food and an inflated shopping bill.

I know that all of you Deliaphiles are now thinking "You couldn't do any better you bad, bad man!" Of course I can. Here are my top three cheat-at-cooking tips: 1) Buy a potato ricer - instant mash with unpeeled baked / boiled spuds; 2) Use smooth peanut butter in hummus instead of tahini ; 3) If there was a number 3 I'd be writing vacuous cookery books now, wouldn't I?
Comment Comments (7) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Oct 14, 2013 5:01 PM BST


Made in Italy: Food and Stories
Made in Italy: Food and Stories
by Dan Lepard
Edition: Hardcover

46 of 46 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Il Maestro, 25 Sep 2007
I've got tens of Italian cookbooks and this is the one I would fight to keep. It's all well and good having 40 recipes for courgettes a la 'Silver Spoon', but good food is so much more than join-the-dots recipes. It's about fantastic ingredients and people and ideas and places and inspiration and stories and passion. 'Made in Italy' is all of these things tied together with beautiful photography by the obscenely multi-talented Dan Leppard.

Technically, there isn't anything in here that a confident amateur couldn't tackle. Some of it is time consuming, as good food can be, but there's certainly nothing here on the timescale and complexity of a French cassoulet. Some of the recipes are involved, but I want that in a cookbook. If all you ever do is make bruschetta, minestrone and pasta al forno then you will eat well but your cooking will probably never improve. If you don't want a challenge and don't want to spend a happy Saturday afternoon in the kitchen hand-making tortellini or perfecting the epic cannoli di ricotta then fair enough. Stick with, say, 'Jamie's Italy': an excellent, easy to follow introduction to Italian cooking that covers all of the classics.

The recipes are all outstanding, as you would expect from a chef of Locatelli's reputation. He delights in passing on his expertise and writes with warmth, honesty and humour. What really shines is the depth of background information on ingredients and dishes, and the detailed explanations of why things are done just so. I learned more about risotto, for example, from 'Made in Italy' than from the rest of my Italian food books put together. It's this fundamental understanding of what a dish is about that will make you a better cook. Much better.

Locatelli uses authentic ingedients and this is how it should be. What fits the dish fits the dish. Not all of these ingredients are readily available from your local Happy Shopper but he usually suggests alternatives, for example substituting Sardinian Ovinfort cheese (Google hits 241) with Gorgonzola (3,710,000). Of course if you want to make bottarga salad then you're going to need a slab of bottarga and that's what the Internet is for. The book is north-centric and better for it. It specialises. Italian food is not just pasta, oil and tomatoes whatever Saturday Kitchen would have you think.

If you want a workhorse book of recipes then get 'Silver Spoon', or on a smaller scale Elizabeth David's 'Italian Food' or Oliver's 'Jamie's Italy'. 'Made in Italy' is so much more than a recipe book. If you want to come that bit closer to understanding Italy and its food and people then buy Locatelli's book, read it and love it.
Comment Comments (2) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Dec 13, 2013 11:22 PM GMT


Simple French Food
Simple French Food
by Richard Olney
Edition: Hardcover
Price: £14.99

7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Inspiring, 11 April 2007
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Simple French Food (Hardcover)
Just reading this book makes you want to dance about gleefully in your kitchen like some culinary Rumplestiltskin. Yes, Olney's turn of phrase can sometimes grate, but it's also partly what makes the book an absorbing read. His understanding of 'cuisine bourgeois' is second to none, and if I could only have one French cook book in my library it would be this one.


You Are What You Eat Cookbook
You Are What You Eat Cookbook
by Gillian McKeith
Edition: Paperback
Price: £12.24

70 of 111 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Charlatan and, frankly, a rubbish cook, 22 July 2005
1. She's not a Doctor (she bought her qualification from an unaccredited American college for a few grand). Her claiming the title "Dr" is an offence to anyone who has spent years of effort earning that honour.
2. She knows nothing about nutrition. The British Dietetic Association say "it is obvious she hasn't a clue about nutrition. In fact her advice, if followed to the limit, could be dangerous."
3. She talks through her backside. John Garrow, professor emeritus in human nutrition at London University, says that "In my view Dr Gillian McKeith is a charlatan".
4. She can't cook for toffee. Where did she train? Who taught her? Her recipes are at best tasteless and at worst emetic.
5. Don't buy her books and give money to a quack. Eat a balanced diet, exercise, have fun - you will lose weight and feel good.


You Are What You Eat : The Plan that Will Change Your Life
You Are What You Eat : The Plan that Will Change Your Life
by Gillian McKeith
Edition: Paperback
Price: £13.48

85 of 97 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars McKeith is a charlatan..., 22 July 2005
1. She's not a Doctor (she bought her qualification from an unaccredited American college for a few grand). Her claiming the title "Dr" is an offence to anyone who has spent years of effort earning that honour.
2. She knows nothing about nutrition. The British Dietetic Association say "it is obvious she hasn't a clue about nutrition. In fact her advice, if followed to the limit, could be dangerous."
3. She talks through her backside. John Garrow, professor emeritus in human nutrition at London University, says that "In my view Dr Gillian McKeith is a charlatan".
4. Don't buy her books and give money to a quack. Eat a balanced diet, exercise, have fun - you will lose weight and feel good.


Dr. Gillian Mckeith's Living Food For Health: 12 natural superfoods to transform your health
Dr. Gillian Mckeith's Living Food For Health: 12 natural superfoods to transform your health
by Gillian McKeith
Edition: Paperback
Price: £7.99

72 of 106 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars She's a charlatan - not a doctor, 22 July 2005
1. She's not a Doctor (she bought her qualification from an unaccredited American college for a few grand). Her claiming the title "Dr" is an offence to anyone who has spent years of effort earning that honour.
2. She knows nothing about nutrition. The British Dietetic Association say "it is obvious she hasn't a clue about nutrition. In fact her advice, if followed to the limit, could be dangerous."
3. She talks through her backside. John Garrow, professor emeritus in human nutrition at London University, says that "In my view Dr Gillian McKeith is a charlatan".
4. Don't buy her books and give money to a quack. Eat a balanced diet, exercise, have fun - you will lose weight and feel good.


Becoming a Teacher: Issues in Secondary Teaching (2nd Edition)
Becoming a Teacher: Issues in Secondary Teaching (2nd Edition)
by Justin Dillon
Edition: Paperback

3 of 5 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Good reference for new teachers - but I never did finish it, 19 July 2005
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Got about half way through during training and had the urge to cut off my eyelids with nail-clippers, run outside and stare at the sun. I'm now two years into the job and regularly nail my head to the desk by the end of registration.
It is, of course, dull by nature but is a very good reference for new teachers. Could probably do with an update if one hasn't been done already...
Comment Comment (1) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Jun 2, 2008 1:51 PM BST


South Wind Through the Kitchen: The Best of Elizabeth David
South Wind Through the Kitchen: The Best of Elizabeth David
by Elizabeth David
Edition: Paperback

9 of 14 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Liz is god...., 19 July 2005
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
It's the "best of" Elizabeth David. What's not to like?
No nonsense, anecdotal, scathing, informative, intelligent, witty, interesting. And the food's superb too. Makes Delia look like the amateur she is.


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