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Rama Rao "Rama" (Annandale, VA, USA)

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Deanna Durbin Sweetheart Pack [DVD] [Region 1] [US Import] [NTSC]
Deanna Durbin Sweetheart Pack [DVD] [Region 1] [US Import] [NTSC]
Offered by RAREWAVES USA
Price: £11.42

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Classic movies of Deanna Durbin, 12 Oct. 2009
Deanna Durbin is a spectacular singing sensation from the North of the border, from Winnipeg, Manitoba. She broke into Hollywood at a young age of 15, with a gift of lovely operatic voice that helped her early career in Hollywood. In 1938 she was honored with Mickey Rooney with Special Academy Award. The Academy cited the award "for bringing to the screen the spirit and personification of youth." Deanna had several issues with MGM/Universal studios and complained that her image was not properly rewarded with better roles as she matured from a little girl into adulthood. Professionally, at a certain level, Deanna was in competition with Judy Garland. In some of her later interviews she referred to Deanna Durbin in third person (that was her stage name). She retired from her movie career at a young age of 27 and lived in seclusion in Paris. She is immortalized in the Hollywood walk of fame and also at the Grumman Chinese theater (foot and hand prints) in Hollywood, California. Joe Pasternak who produced many of her early movies spoke very highly her talents. After Great Depression of 1929, Hollywood became unkind to Wall Street executives, and movie studios made several movies that poked at their shallow life styles. Some of Deanna's movies were made at this time (1930s) and shows like, First Love, and It started with eve fall in this category.

1. Three Smart Girls

The Sisters - A family story (three stars)
This story is about three little sisters; Penny Craig (Deanna Durbin), Joan Craig (Nan Grey), and Kay Craig (Helen Parrish) fighting over the boys they love, and how it all comes together at the end. You may need a score card for this. When Penny finds that her sister Kay is interested in the fiancée of Joan, she asks her pianist friend Harry Loren (Robert Cummings) to romance Kay, but it backfires and he likes to romance Joan. Outraged Penny insults him and throws him out. Mrs. Craig (Nella Walker) misunderstands this episode and believes that her little girl Penny is jealous and has fallen in love with an older man. She hatches a plan to separate Penny from seeing Harry at the music school, and asks her stockbroker-husband Judson Craig (Charles Winniger) for help. Penny in the mean time expects Harry and Joan, and Kay and Richard to bond in love. When Penny and Kay fight over Richard, Judson is forced to remove himself from his business meetings for a day and get involved with his daughters affairs. Then he leads Joan and Harry, and then Kay and Richard to the altar, while Penny and the whole family beam with happiness. Deanna is superb as a little girl, and she was only 15 when she made this film

2. Something in the wind

The family greed (two stars)
Mary Collins (Deanna Durbin) works for a radio station owned by a wealthy family as singing disc jockey. Donald Reed (John Dall), the owner mistakenly thinks that Mary is the mistress of his recently deceased grandfather Henry Reed, and the snobbish Donald offers her a cash settlement if she refutes any claims against the family estate, obviously Mary becomes angry. Later Mary is abducted from the radio station into the Reed family home and persuade her not cause harm to the family name, and Mary agrees if they pay her a million dollar to support her and "her child" by Henry Reed. When Mary gets the check, her aunt Mary (Jean Adair) returns the check to Read family and tells her that it is against her family principles. Later and Donald reunite on a television show. This movie has some scandals and tricks which shows Deanna Durbin more as a cunning young lady than her other roles where she is very principled.

3. First Love

A Fine Romance (three stars)
Considerable publicity surrounded the release of this movie in which the young Robert Stack gave the 18 year old Deanna her first on-screen kiss. Constance Harding (Deanna Durbin) is treated unfairly by her adopted family of James Clinton (Eugene Pallette), especially her sister Barbara Clinton (Helen Parrish), and her mother Grace Clinton (Leatrice Joy). James is a busy Wall Street executive and does not notice the problems at home, but his servants at home are well aware of the problem and needless to say they are behind young Constance every step of the way. Barbara is in love with a young man from a wealthy family named Ted Drake (Robert Stack). Barbara tries very hard so that he loves her but circumstance lead him to Constance, with a lot of help from the staff at the household and of course due diligence of James Clinton. At the end young Ted sees the light and falls in love with charming singing sensation Constance. As you must have guessed that there are a lot of mishaps and screwball comedy before this ever happens.

4. It started with eve

Who is in love with whom? (Four stars)
This is a romantic comedy-drama in which the man thinks that he is in love with a woman and wants to be married to her, but the man's father wants his son marry another girl. Does this sound confusing? Perhaps not if you see the movie; it is hilarious, and Deana is absolutely wonderful in this screwball slapstick.

Billionaire Jonathan Reynolds (Charles Laughton) is terminally ill and would like to meet the fiancée of his only son Johnny Reynolds (Robert Cummings). When Johnny couldn't find his fiancée Gloria Pennington (Margaret Tallichet) at her hotel, desperately, he asks the hat-check girl Anne Terry (Deanna Durbin) to pretend to be Gloria. She reluctantly agrees, and meets his "dying" father, and finds herself the favorite fiancée of his son. As his father gets better he develops more interest to see his future daughter-in-law rather his son, and this makes her to stay at their house. As the movie progresses things get hilarious and confusion surrounds for Reynolds family. In the meantime, Gloria leaves Johnny and Johnny falls in love with Anne. The story runs though very funny and sometimes embarrassing situations for Johnny, Anne and Jonathan. I like the scenes when Johnny runs to the train station when Anne tries to go back to her home town in Ohio, and how Jonathan tries to smoke a cigar when he is strictly forbidden by his personal physician and his caretaker.

5. Can't help singing

Can't help falling in love (three stars)
This is her only film in Technicolor. Caroline Frost (Deanna Durbin), the only daughter of Senator Martin Frost (Ray Collins) is in love with a soldier named Lieutenant Robert Latham (David Bruce) which displeases her father. When he sends Robert away to California during the Gold rush era, Caroline runs away from home to meet him in Sonora, California. When her father reports Caroline missing and announces a $5,000 reward for the safe return of his daughter. On her way to California Caroline is conned by pranksters and thieves, and loses all her money. She goes in search of her money and finds that a gambler named Lawlor (Robert Page) has her money, she demands her money and he recognizes Caroline as the missing senator's daughter and threatens to turn her in for the reward, until she offers him $10,000 to take her to California. Caroline promises (lies to) him that he will be paid by her wealthy fiancée named Jake Carstairs. When they arrive in California, she meets Carstairs, and asks him to play along with the hoax, and pretend that he is her fiancé. Complications arise when Carstairs' wife arrives and accuses her husband of having an affair. In the confusion, Robert arrives, calling out for his fiancée. A fistfight between Robert and Lawlor ensues because Lawlor believes that Caroline has a third suitor. Finally the truth comes out, and Lawlor and Caroline resume their romance with a happy ending.

6. Lady on a train

Lady on a Train is a Thriller (Five stars)
This is a mystery movie in which Deanna assumes a sophisticated film persona. Nikki Collins (Deanna Durbin) witnesses a murder during her train trip New York City and sets to investigate that when the local police become uncooperative. After viewing a news report, she learns that Joseah Waring, a shipping magnate died accidentally while decorating a Christmas tree at his Long Island estate. When Nikki goes to investigate his death on his property, Arnold Waring (Dan Duryea), Joseah's nephew finds her and mistakes for Margo Martin, a nightclub singer and Joseah's fiancée. During her stay at the estate she finds several incriminating evidences such as the bloody slippers of Joseah, and a possible motive for murder since Joseah disinherits his family and leaves his fortune to Margo Martin.

Nikki goes to meet the real Margo Martin (Deanna Durbin), but Arnold Waring finds her in the night club and locks her up in a room, and a little later she is rescued by mystery writer Wayne Morgan (David Bruce), at the cost of his engagement to fiancée, Joyce Williams (Patricia Morison). Nikki suspects that Arnold is the murderer but she later finds out that Jonathan Waring (Ralph Bellamy), Arnold's older brother is the psychopathic killer. This realization occurs when she is alone with Jonathan in the same room in which Joseah was killed. Jonathan confides to Nikki that he will kill her, and frame his brother Arnold for her murder. Finally Jonathan is arrested by the local police, and Nikki and Wayne fall in love and tie the knot.

This DVD has six movies of one of the legends of Hollywood; I would say it is a steal if you look at the price of this DVD: Highly recommended

1. His Butler's Sister [DVD]
2. Deanna Durbin: the Ultimate Collection [19 Disc Box Set] [DVD]
3. I'll Be Yours [DVD]
4. Mad About Music [DVD] [1938]
5. Christmas Holiday [DVD] [1944]


Consciousness: How Matter Becomes Imagination (Penguin Press Science)
Consciousness: How Matter Becomes Imagination (Penguin Press Science)
by Gerald M Edelman
Edition: Paperback
Price: £13.99

14 of 16 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Neurobiology of consciousness, 7 Oct. 2009
This is an excellent review of consciousness from the neurobiological point of view. Consciousness has been an interesting topic for study not only for neurobiologists but also for philosophers and physicists. Although consciousness is a highly debated topic because of its close interaction with matter in space and time, it is certainly least understood subject as it is at the borderline of physics, philosophy and neurobiology. Some quantum physicists argue that it is a universal field like space, time or energy, but consciousness does not figure in equations or any mathematical calculations. Secondly consciousness is found only in living beings and not in inanimate objects: Particularly animals that have brain and central nervous system. The book is summarized as follows:

Three working assumptions are made as methodological platform; 1) the physics assumption; conventional physical processes are required to explain consciousness or the conscious experience, 2) the evolutionary assumption; consciousness is evolved by natural selection in the animal systems, and 3) qualia assumption; the subjective, qualitative aspects of consciousness, being private, cannot be communicated directly through a scientific theory. The authors do not attempt to explain many forms of perception, imagery, thought, emo¬tion, mood, attention, will, or self-consciousness. Instead, they concentrate on certain fundamental properties of consciousness that are shared by every conscious states, such as the unity of a conscious state experienced as a whole and cannot be subdivided into independent components, and the infor¬mativeness, i.e., where a conscious state is selected from a repertoire of billions of possible conscious states, each with different behavioral consequences within a fraction of a second. The basic assumption in all this is that consciousness is a process that is private, selective, and continually changing. It is strictly a process, and not belonging to a particular section of brain. This means that consciousness is associated with biological structures that produce dynamic processes. Thus both morphology and consciousness are the products of evolutionary selection (natural selection). This assumption about the evolutionary origin of consciousness avoids fruitless efforts to relate consciousness to computer logic or the effect of quantum gravity on neurons or a pure quantum physical process while diminishing the role of brain.

Neural substrates of consciousness involve large populations of neurons and no single area of brain is responsible for conscious experience. As the task to be learned is practiced and its performance becomes more and more mechanical then the learning task fades from the memory and the regions for this task becomes smaller. Conscious experience is associated with changes of activity patterns occurring simultaneously in many regions of brain (i.e., activation and inactivation of a population of neurons). It is not how many neurons are active but it is the distribution of groups of neurons that can engage in strong and rapid re-entrant interactions. Further more, the activity patterns of rapidly interacting groups must be constantly changing and sufficiently differentiated from each other: This is called Dynamic Core Hypothesis. Consciousness is an extraordinarily differentiated. At any given time, we experience a particular conscious state selected out of billions of possible states, each of which can lead to different behavioral consequences. The occurrence of a particular conscious state is therefore highly informative in the specific sense that information is the reduction of uncertainty among a number of alternatives. If this is the case the neural processes underlying the conscious experience must also be highly differentiated and informative.

Memory is a central brain mechanism that leads to consciousness. Memory does not store inscription or information in any format. In higher organisms it is an act of creation for every act of perception, and every act of memory is an act of imagination. The primary consciousness has the ability to construct an integrated mental scene in the present that does not require language or true sense of self. The integrated neural scene depends on both perceptual categorization of incoming sensor stimuli (the present) and its interaction with categorical memories (the past). The neural mechanisms distinguish primary consciousness and higher order consciousness. Primary consciousness is found in human as well as some higher order animals, but these lack language, analytical skill, and limited symbolic (semantic) capabilities. Still they are capable of constructing a mental scene. The higher-order consciousness found in humans has semantic capability and linguistic capability in most advanced form which provides a sense of self and the ability to construct past and future. The author' main contention is that the consciousness arose from evolutionary innovations in the morphology of the brain and body. The mind arises from the body and its development. Much of the discussion by the authors are theoretical in nature and needs extensive experimental evidences to support this theory.

1. The Creative Cosmos: Towards a Unified Science of Matter, Life and Mind
2. Languages of the Brain: Experimental Paradoxes and Principles of Neuropsychology (Prentice-Hall series in experimental psychology)
Comment Comment (1) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Mar 27, 2013 10:27 AM GMT


Finding God in Physics: Einstein's Missing Relative
Finding God in Physics: Einstein's Missing Relative
by Roy Masters
Edition: Paperback

2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Finding biblical God in physics, 7 Oct. 2009
The author makes a desperate attempt to relate the gospels with the laws of physics. This book is principally written for Christian fundamentalists interested in finding God in physics. The reader must keep an open mind in understanding physical reality, and accept that established religions such as Christianism is man-made and the laws of physics is God created. Almost all scientists especially quantum physicists who understands the work of God much closely than anyone have always admitted that there is God, but their conception of God almighty is different from biblical descriptions. Albert Einstein believed God as an entity but not as the God the father of the New Testament.

The author quotes many physicists and philosophers in this book in a determined effort to substantiate that all laws of physics point towards the existence of God. It is true that Albert Einstein used the word God in many of his discussions with fellow physicists but his vision of God was limited to the understanding of physical reality as we observe and understand it through physics. One of the main proposals in this book is that the interstellar space is not void but it has some unknown force called the "original energy" that created the universe. This energy is manifested through the gravity and acts on matter in spacetime. The author's description comes close to dark energy although he doesn't call it dark energy: This energy is supposed to be at the root of Big Bang. But what was there before space, time and matter evolved? He postulates the existence of a pre-time force or original energy that controls the speed of light (similar to ether), and this time is an Omni-directional energy field from which the smallest particle called orgitron came into existence from pre-time force simultaneously creating space and time. The author concludes that the failure of physics is because it does not assume that God existed before Big Bang, and he quotes the biblical passages extensively to state that all unexplained phenomenon in physics may be understood through God. The author discusses his vision in 17 chapters but his concepts rarely flow through; it reads like a hotchpotch ideas tossed everywhere with very little support from physics.

1. The Creative Cosmos: Towards a Unified Science of Matter, Life and Mind
2. Languages of the Brain: Experimental Paradoxes and Principles of Neuropsychology (Prentice-Hall series in experimental psychology)
3. Wholeness and the Implicate Order (Routledge Classics)
4. The Holographic Universe


The Foodie Handbook: The (almost) Definitive Guide to Gastronomy
The Foodie Handbook: The (almost) Definitive Guide to Gastronomy
by Pim Techamuanvivit
Edition: Paperback

4.0 out of 5 stars The recipes for a connoisseur, 7 Oct. 2009
This book of recipes is written by a chef known for her blog called Chez Pim where she describes her experiences in the world of food. There are four sections in the book each entitled; How to eat like a foodie, How to cook like a foodie, How to drink like a foodie, and How to be a fabulous foodie. This book is a product of her observations and adventures in recipes and also in politics and economics of food. You come across not only recipes but also such a topics as; ethical issues of food, wine, pairing food with wine, Thai food, and a discussion about buying locally grown food versus imported food,

In the first section the author gives some useful tips to the readers regarding what to look for when you want to dine out or organize a party at a local restaurant, or detecting ten signs of mediocrity about the menu; I found this interesting. The second chapter is mainly about recipes which many readers would be interested. The recipe has lots of details and gives more information about the ingredients used in the recipe. For the lovers of Thai food the Pad Thai recipe using prawns or chicken or Tofu (for vegetarians) with tamarind sauce is nicely illustrated and I highly recommend trying this recipe if you are a Thai food fan or Indian curry

The section on how to be a fabulous foodie deals with various issues related to food. On the ethical issues of food, I expected her to discuss ethical issues of halal meat (Islamic food) where an animal slowly and cruelly bleed to death or indiscriminate wasting food in United States when there is a shortage of food in Africa or choosing veganism over animal meat. You don't find any such discussions; instead she discusses locally grown food versus organic food, buying in bulk, using your shopping bags instead of paper or plastic, drinking tap water instead of bottled water, etc.

This is a slightly different kind of recipe book; if you have read her blog on Chez Pim, you would perhaps know a little more of what to expect from this book.

1. Thai Food
2. Chinese, Indian and Thai Cuisine Passport (Let's Eat Out!)


Blonde Venus [1932] [DVD]
Blonde Venus [1932] [DVD]
Dvd ~ Marlene Dietrich
Price: £5.00

3 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Marlene Dietrich is very touching, 30 Sept. 2009
This review is from: Blonde Venus [1932] [DVD] (DVD)
Director Josef von Sternberg collaborated with Marlene Dietrich to make highly successful movies at the height of depression era when silent movie transitioned to sound movies. The list includes; Blonde Venus, Morocco, Dishonored, Shanghai Express, The Scarlet Empress, and The Devil is a Woman. Marlene Dietrich is not only beautiful but also an excellent actress. She offers brilliant performance as Helen Faraday who runs around the country to avoid authorities taking her only son, Johnny (Dickie Moore) from her, and give it the custody of her husband Edward Faraday (Herbert Marshall). One would like to remember another great classic, Madame X, starring Lana Turner and John Forsythe where a mother is separated from her son and she longs to get back to her son. The difference being the latter is highly dramatized which makes a grown-man cry. Director Sternberg has brilliantly handled this movie into a different direction which spares the viewers from agony. Yet the legendary lady of Hollywood fascinates viewers as a tender mother strongly protecting her child, who spends her evenings singing at the local night club, and be at home to offer her deep maternal love. She does her best to be very alluring. It touches us deeply when she tries to teach her son from a book like a school teacher or lullaby at his bedside.

The story has a twist in that Helen's unselfish nature to help her husband get treatment in Germany for radiation poisoning. She finds a willing millionaire Nick Townsend (Cary Grant), who helps her with cash needed. She lies to Edward that the money is advance on her salary from her boss Dan O'Connor (Robert O'Conner). After his treatment in Germany Edward finds out about Helen's infidelity, and demands the custody of Johnny. Helen and Nick meet again in Paris and agree to get married but at the end Edward and Helen unite to stay together.

The movie has interesting features; while Marlene Dietrich's singing is s a little rustic, but the film featuring live chickens in her French Quarter apartment in New Orleans is a nice touch. Hattie McDaniel as Helen's New Orleans maid Cora offers her best performance as a protective friend of Helen. This is a very touching story and I recommend it highly.

1. Scarlet Empress [DVD] [1934]
2. Shanghai Express [DVD] [1932]
3. The Blue Angel - - Two Disc Special Edition [DVD] [1930]
4. Morocco [DVD] [1930]
5. Angel [DVD] [1937]
6. Marlene Dietrich: The Glamour Collection [DVD] [Region 1] [US Import] [NTSC]
7. Portrait in Black/Madame X [DVD] [Region 1] [US Import] [NTSC]


Lio's Astonishing Tales: From the Haunted Crypt of Unknown Horrors (Lio Collection)
Lio's Astonishing Tales: From the Haunted Crypt of Unknown Horrors (Lio Collection)
by Mark Tatulli
Edition: Paperback
Price: £10.91

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Lio's book of known horrors, 30 Sept. 2009
This is an interesting book of cartoons, with a catchy title by the author Mark Tatulli right in time for the Halloween of 2009: It is a great marketing strategy. Looking through this book you come across interesting piece of history of cartoon character Lio. You get to see the first drawing of the cartoon character and the evolution of Lio as the concept progressed. Some of the highlights include the following: The piece on the first appearance of Peanut characters on Lio is very funny. The bubble-bath strip written for Detroit Free Press was deemed too suggestive is very tacky. The Dagwood sandwich of the cartoon character of comic strip "Blondie," without a toothpick looks like Dagwood's head floating on the sandwich. The groovy chick robot from Fritz Lang's classic silent movie, Metropolis is nicely used in the depiction of the carton strip. The use of the Return of Swamp Thing in color is very creative and well presented.

This book of cartoons is funny and sometimes too suggestive. The choice of the author of using a lot of grotesque characters is appropriate for Halloween but not everyday is Halloween. Overall it is a fun comic strip worth reading.


Desk Set (Ws Dub Sub Dol) [DVD] [Region 1] [US Import] [NTSC]
Desk Set (Ws Dub Sub Dol) [DVD] [Region 1] [US Import] [NTSC]
Offered by supermart_usa
Price: £5.00

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Bunny Vs EMMARAC and Richard, 18 Sept. 2009
Spencer Tracy and Katharine Hepburn movies are fun to watch; they are great comedies that bring quality family entertainment. Some of their movies tackle social and domestic issues. In the movie Adam's Rib, the inequality of the law; the unwritten rule of husbands shooting adulterers (but not wives) is examined. The movie Pat and Mike deals with the success of women athletes in professional sports, and how some greedy male managers try to exploit them. In Desk Set, the story is about the effect of automation at work place and how it affects the jobs and lives of workers. You get to see a lot of lighter side of office environment.

When efficiency expert Richard Sumner (Spencer Tracy) is assigned to the research department of the Federal Broadcasting Company to evaluate work patterns, his eccentric behavior catches the imagination of researchers Bunny Watson (Katharine Hepburn), Peg Costello (Joan Blondell), Sylvia Blair (Dina Merrill) and Ruthie Saylor (Sue Randall). They begin to worry when Sumner informs Bunny that his mission is to improve the efficiency, but actually Mr. Azae (Nicholas Joy), the head of the network, approves a project to computerize the department and asks Richard to keep the project a secret.

Bunny admires a gown she purchases and all excited in the hope that Mike Cutler (Gig Young), her boss and suitor of seven years will invite her to a country club dance. However, circumstances prevent that from happening, and in the mean time Bunny start dating Richard. The date turns into business meetings for them as Bunny finds out that Richard is the inventor and patent holder of EMMARAC, an electronic brain. The women at research department get worried that their jobs will lost due to the machine, when they find out that half the payroll department gets pink slips after EMMARAC becomes the machine of the Payroll department.

On the eve of a big weekend, Mike break his date with Bunny because of a business trip to Chicago, and in the meantime on a stormy day, Smithers (Harry Ellerbe), the office gossip offers Richard and Bunny a ride and drops them at Bunny's apartment building. Bunny invites the soaked Richard in for dinner and gives him a robe to wear that she has bought as a Christmas gift for Mike. Mike's plane gets cancelled due to inclement weather and he visits Bunny's apartment and gets shocked to see Richard in robe. This is one of the funniest moments of the movie. However, later, at the office Christmas party, the research staff laments the fact that this will be their last office party. The air of congeniality is shattered at the research department when Miss Warringer (Neva Patterson), an assistant of Richard and a computer operator start working. Due to an error of the machine entire staff gets pink dismissal slips including Richard. This is another hilarious moment and the movie takes a jab at the competence of a machine replacing people. The staff obviously sad begins to pack up and refuse to answer the phones, which forces Miss Warringer to deal with the onslaught of calls. Richard then explains that EMMARAC was never intended to replace the research department, but only to help them do their job, and the project was kept secret because of an impending merger with another network.

William Marchant's play Desk Set was based on an actual CBS research librarian, Agnes E. Law, though the film's shots of Rockefeller Center suggest NBC. In Marchant's play there was no romance between Richard Sumner and Bunny Watson, but screenwriters Henry and Phoebe Ephron added a romantic story line to capitalize on the enormous success of Tracy and Hepburn screen relationship. The socialite-heiress Dina Merrill made her film debut in this movie, and Joan Blondell offers an excellent performance as Bunny's sidekick Peg.

This movie is set around Christmas time and movie-critics never mention this. I believe any movie set in Christmas time deserved to be treated as movie worth watching during Christmas time. You get to feel and enjoy the joyous occasion. The festive spirit is reflected in the office, windows, and doors being decorated with Christmas wreaths, Christmas Carols in the background, Christmas party at work with office Santa Claus is a very happy occasion.


Desk Set [DVD] [1957]
Desk Set [DVD] [1957]
Dvd ~ Spencer Tracy

4.0 out of 5 stars Bunny Vs EMMARAC and Richard, 18 Sept. 2009
This review is from: Desk Set [DVD] [1957] (DVD)
Spencer Tracy and Katharine Hepburn movies are fun to watch; they are great comedies that bring quality family entertainment. Some of their movies tackle social and domestic issues. In the movie Adam's Rib, the inequality of the law; the unwritten rule of husbands shooting adulterers (but not wives) is examined. The movie Pat and Mike deals with the success of women athletes in professional sports, and how some greedy male managers try to exploit them. In Desk Set, the story is about the effect of automation at work place and how it affects the jobs and lives of workers. You get to see a lot of lighter side of office environment.

When efficiency expert Richard Sumner (Spencer Tracy) is assigned to the research department of the Federal Broadcasting Company to evaluate work patterns, his eccentric behavior catches the imagination of researchers Bunny Watson (Katharine Hepburn), Peg Costello (Joan Blondell), Sylvia Blair (Dina Merrill) and Ruthie Saylor (Sue Randall). They begin to worry when Sumner informs Bunny that his mission is to improve the efficiency, but actually Mr. Azae (Nicholas Joy), the head of the network, approves a project to computerize the department and asks Richard to keep the project a secret.

Bunny admires a gown she purchases and all excited in the hope that Mike Cutler (Gig Young), her boss and suitor of seven years will invite her to a country club dance. However, circumstances prevent that from happening, and in the mean time Bunny start dating Richard. The date turns into business meetings for them as Bunny finds out that Richard is the inventor and patent holder of EMMARAC, an electronic brain. The women at research department get worried that their jobs will lost due to the machine, when they find out that half the payroll department gets pink slips after EMMARAC becomes the machine of the Payroll department.

On the eve of a big weekend, Mike break his date with Bunny because of a business trip to Chicago, and in the meantime on a stormy day, Smithers (Harry Ellerbe), the office gossip offers Richard and Bunny a ride and drops them at Bunny's apartment building. Bunny invites the soaked Richard in for dinner and gives him a robe to wear that she has bought as a Christmas gift for Mike. Mike's plane gets cancelled due to inclement weather and he visits Bunny's apartment and gets shocked to see Richard in robe. This is one of the funniest moments of the movie. However, later, at the office Christmas party, the research staff laments the fact that this will be their last office party. The air of congeniality is shattered at the research department when Miss Warringer (Neva Patterson), an assistant of Richard and a computer operator start working. Due to an error of the machine entire staff gets pink dismissal slips including Richard. This is another hilarious moment and the movie takes a jab at the competence of a machine replacing people. The staff obviously sad begins to pack up and refuse to answer the phones, which forces Miss Warringer to deal with the onslaught of calls. Richard then explains that EMMARAC was never intended to replace the research department, but only to help them do their job, and the project was kept secret because of an impending merger with another network.

William Marchant's play Desk Set was based on an actual CBS research librarian, Agnes E. Law, though the film's shots of Rockefeller Center suggest NBC. In Marchant's play there was no romance between Richard Sumner and Bunny Watson, but screenwriters Henry and Phoebe Ephron added a romantic story line to capitalize on the enormous success of Tracy and Hepburn screen relationship. The socialite-heiress Dina Merrill made her film debut in this movie, and Joan Blondell offers an excellent performance as Bunny's sidekick Peg.

This movie is set around Christmas time and movie-critics never mention this. I believe any movie set in Christmas time deserved to be treated as movie worth watching during Christmas time. You get to feel and enjoy the joyous occasion. The festive spirit is reflected in the office, windows, and doors being decorated with Christmas wreaths, Christmas Carols in the background, Christmas party at work with office Santa Claus is a very happy occasion.


Three Faces of Eve [DVD] [1957] [Region 1] [US Import] [NTSC]
Three Faces of Eve [DVD] [1957] [Region 1] [US Import] [NTSC]
Offered by passionFlix UK
Price: £4.58

9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Joanne Woodward is simply spectacular, 17 Sept. 2009
This is one of the finest movies of Joanne Woodward in which she performs the role of a housewife torn between three contrasting personalities; Eve White, Eve Black and Jane. This is a real life story about multiple personality disorder suffered by Chris Costner Sizemore of South Carolina, and diagnosed by Drs. Corbett H. Thigpen, and Hervey M. Cleckley. This story was brilliantly adapted for the screen by the work of Nunnally Johnson, who also wrote for such classics as: How to Marry a Millionaire, Mr. Hobbs Takes a Vacation, and We're not Married.

Woodward plays the role of socially repressed Eve White, a housewife and mother of a daughter, Bonnie White (Terry Ann Ross). The second personality is the oversexed Eve Black, clad in sexy bras, and short skirts, drinking, smoking, and always ready for fun at the local bar; and the third person called Jane who is relatively normal. The viewers see a metamorphosis in Eve White who changes from perfect housewife to a downright difficult lady. The real drama unfolds in the offices of Dr. Curtis Luther (Lee Cobb) who methodically investigates the psychological disorder of his patient and comes to the conclusion that Eve suffers from the split personalities of three contrasting women. There is a great deal of drama when the viewers see Eve strangling her only daughter when she "appears" as Eve Black (Eve Black considers that is not her child). The constant fights and domestic problems with her husband Ralph White (David Wayne), and his visits to see her at the psychiatric hospital are very moving. When she is resident of the state facility for mentally disturbed, we find more of the irresponsible and selfish nature of Eve Black who hangs out in the bars, picks men and finally disappoints them, no matter how much it hurts them. In almost all instances we see the appearance of conservative Eve White after Eve black transforms herself; that is, when she sobers of and tries to understand what has happened, and feel embarrassed that she is sitting in the bar in skimpy clothes.

There is an interesting history behind casting. When director Nunnally Johnson's tried to cast actress Jennifer Jones for the leading role; she confessed being terrified of the part. June Allyson simply refused to play, and Judy Garland at first agreed to take part in the movie, but when saw the actual films of Chris Sizemore undergoing psychotherapy, and transformation to split personalities, she got scared. Joanne Woodward read the script on the train from New York to Los Angeles and confessed that she was so afraid of the role she almost returned to New York. Johnson wanted to have Sizemore interviewed for the movie, but her psychiatrists said that she was not ready for the experience. Sizemore continued to manifest new personalities after her supposed cure, up to 22 personalities in all, until 1970s. She did not see the film until 1974, and she found it moving and praised the performance of Joanne Woodward.

There are many situations that are close to the real story. Just as Chris Sizemore had displayed in her therapy, Woodward used a Southern accent for the two Eves and dropped this accent when she became Jane. One change Johnson suggested was making the transformations slowly than Sizemore had actually experienced in the real life. During therapy, Sizemore switched personalities fairly quickly, but the director felt that would not be believable to a movie audience unfamiliar with multiple personality disorder. Each event is chronicled accurately, and as the years in which it all took place pass, viewers see personalities appear and disappear, and transform to one another. One thing that is overlooked over the years in many reviews is the brilliant portrayal of Dr. Luther by Lee Cobb, who has offered brilliant performance and strongly complements the fine work of Woodward.

The Chris Costner Sizemore Papers span the time period 1952-1989, with the bulk of the papers dating between 1956 and 1979. These are currently available at the Duke University library (Duke.edu). The collection consists largely of correspondence; diaries and writings by Sizemore; clippings centered on film and book promotions and speaking engagements. The papers provide an in-depth look into the life of a woman with a rare disorder who later came to clearly articulate her life to the public.
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The Awful Truth [DVD] (1937) [2003]
The Awful Truth [DVD] (1937) [2003]
Dvd ~ Irene Dunne
Price: £4.10

2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Fun with Jerry and Lucy, 17 Sept. 2009
This is the first of three great movies Cary Grant did with Irene Dunne. Cary had the opportunity to work with some of the most beautiful and talented women of Hollywood. He once said that he had most fun doing films with Irene Dunne. If you want know why he said that; then you may want to watch this movie, because this is precisely what you get, lots of fun watching the easy-going couple go at each other in a humorous sort of way. This is a different kind of "fun with Dick and Jane."

Leo McCarey won the Academy award in the best director category, and Irene got a nod from the Academy in best actress category during the nominating process, which goes show the power of this great classic. McCarey went on to make other classics such as: Once upon a Honeymoon (starring Cary Grant and Ginger Rogers), Bell's of St Mary's (Starring; Bing Crosby and Ingrid Bergman), and An Affair to Remember (Starring; Cary Grant and Deborah Kerr). The story is simply put; man meets woman, man loses woman, and finally man finds the woman again. Jerry Warriner (Cary Grant) and Lucy Warriner (Irene Dunne) are married couple and they split, they start going out with others, soon to be ex husband and wife sabotage each other's love affairs, and finally they reconcile. The fun is in the way they play game at each other and cause numerous fun-filled situations; some outright embarrassing for the other spouse; after all the fight between couples doesn't have to be a courtroom drama or a shouting match full of hostilities

The actual fun starts when they both become suspicious of the other having an affair. Then they agree to separate, and the courtroom drama is really about the custody of their little dog called Mr. Smith. Lucy wins the custody but Jerry gets the visitation rights, and they will have 60 days for the finalization of the divorce. This gives plenty of time to do a great deal of damage to each others romantic encounters with other people. There are many funny and sometimes embarrassing moments involving Jerry and Lucy: When Jerry is angry with Lucy's voice teacher Armand Duvalle (Alexander D'Arcy), because of his alleged affair with Lucy. The second one is the nightclub scene when Lucy' new beau, oil-magnate Dan Leeson (Ralph Bellamy) dance (jitterbug) funny with Lucy, and Jerry faces embarrassment when he tries to romance the nightclub dancer named Dixie Belle Lee (Joyce Compton). The scene I enjoyed most is when Jerry romances snooty socialite Barbara Vance (Molly Lamont), Lucy following his romance in the social columns, shows up at the home of Vance's parents as Jerry's drunken kid sister, and then tries to disengage his engagement in front of shocked Vance and her parents. After all the gimmicks and comedy, they find that they are made for each other, finally reconcile and get back together. This is a wonderful comedy and all fans of Cary Grant and Irene Dunne must see, and it is highly recommended.

1. Penny Serenade [1941] [DVD]
2. My Favorite Wife [DVD] [1940] [Region 1] [US Import] [NTSC]
3. Bing Crosby Collection - Going My Way / The Bells Of St. Mary's [DVD]
4. An Affair To Remember [DVD] [1957]
5. Once Upon A Honeymoon [1942] [VHS]
6. Once Upon A Honeymoon / In Name Only [DVD] Cary Grant Double


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