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The Human Element: Ten New Rules to Kickstart Our Failing Organizations
The Human Element: Ten New Rules to Kickstart Our Failing Organizations
by David Boyle
Edition: Hardcover
Price: £23.63

5.0 out of 5 stars All Aspiring Managers should read this Book, 15 Aug 2013
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All aspiring managers should read this primer on how to build a vibrant and high performing organisation. Even an organisation of a few staff is just as relevant, although the focus is on large organisations. Boyle writes in a simple language which gives his ideas a cogency and an integrity which business books often lack. Also one can pick out chapters that are relevant to one's own organisation now and come back to others later.


Not for Turning: The Life of Margaret Thatcher
Not for Turning: The Life of Margaret Thatcher
by Robin Harris
Edition: Hardcover
Price: £16.00

5.0 out of 5 stars A must-read book, 25 July 2013
A must-read book for anyone interested in the political history of the Thatcher years because the author was based in No 10 for much of this period, and so can give the 'back-story' to many of the most important events. Harris explains some of the motivations by both Thatcher and her ministers for their policies and indeed their disagreements, much of which was not known. For business men like me whose career she saved, the courage she showed at crucial times to lead her cabinet full of doubters was almost breathtaking. The battles with the unions, the Argentinians, and the nationalised industries are very well explained and even exciting.

For all those who disagreed with her, at least it gives detailed descriptions on her thinking and her beliefs.

The indexing is superb as it allows one to dip in and out by following the people and personalities one is particularly interested in. On the big issue of Europe and currencies, time has shown that she has been right against most of her cabinet and certainly her chancellors' advice. But making unpopular decisions with such a feral press is never easy.


Broke: Who Killed the Middle Classes?
Broke: Who Killed the Middle Classes?
by David Boyle
Edition: Paperback
Price: £14.94

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An important book, 25 July 2013
I want my twenty-something children and their friends to read this book. What is so good about this analysis of the breakdown of the middle classes' finances and their standard of living is that it also comes up with solutions. The author does not pin all the criticism on single groups of perpetrators (except perhaps the Lloyds underwriters who encouraged investors with as little as £37,000 to risk all), but accepts that all of us are partly to blame for getting ourselves in these financial straits. It is very readable, and not full of jargon and statistics. It's a good read!

PS: I don't advise prime minsters or chancellors of the exchequer during the last 30 years to read this book as it will make them feel guilty for a lot of ill-thought-out policies,


Trio: Inside the Blair, Brown, Mandelson Project
Trio: Inside the Blair, Brown, Mandelson Project
by Giles Radice
Edition: Hardcover
Price: £18.82

3.0 out of 5 stars Legacy of debt, 27 July 2011
This is a well written and absorbing book that gives the background to how three powerful politicians allowed the country to fall into debt and undo the good they had achieved in earlier years. Their concentration on succesfully spinning their policies hoodwinked the electorate in to believing their never would be a payback day for their seemingly effortless rise in prosperity but which we now know was built on debt. An essential read for the present generation of politicians.


The Nine Lives of Otto Katz
The Nine Lives of Otto Katz
by Jonathan Miles
Edition: Paperback
Price: £7.68

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Revealing, 27 July 2011
Its not the nine lives of Otto's spying that is the most revealing info in this book but the manner of his show trial and death. How his devastating miscalculation which allowed him to return from a spying trip in the West to behind the Iron Curtain when he knew he was under suspicion. No amount of lobbying of his hi authority chums could save him from being thrown into prison. His letters to and from his long suffering wife explain how it gradually dawned on him that he was moving inexorably to the form of slow physical and mental torture to render him compliant ready for the show trial where he would admit his 'guilt' after serving his beloved communism so loyally and dangerously for long years. A man full of energy and vision who now wd probably be a business oligarch but his only route for his passion and beliefs in the 1930's were endless women and tricking Westerners to giving up their secrets. A powerful read.


In The Garden of Beasts: Love and terror in Hitler's Berlin
In The Garden of Beasts: Love and terror in Hitler's Berlin
by Erik Larson
Edition: Hardcover
Price: £15.67

23 of 25 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Absorbing, 26 July 2011
We are have all read books on the Nazi terror but do we know what it was like to have lived under them in Berlin? The terrifying and all pervasive force, even for the American diplomats from whose diaries the accounts are taken, provides a vivid picture. Yet, it also explains how close Hitlers coterie of thugs came to losing power and why many Berliners even as early as 1934 were certain that they would be kicked out. A good read that fills in the gaps of the dreadful Nazi political machine.


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