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Plug "cfoinfo" (Shaftesbury, UK)

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Epson WorkForce WF-3520DWF 4-in-1 Printer with Double-sided Printing
Epson WorkForce WF-3520DWF 4-in-1 Printer with Double-sided Printing

4.0 out of 5 stars Struggled with Duplex Printing, 3 Jan. 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
I've only tried using the printer for printing but I did find it hard to setup for wireless on my mac - even with the use of the non-supplied USB cable. Duplex printing had me completely foxed until I discovered the setting to turn it on under the eco-mode option on the mini screen. I couldn't find this setting mentioned anywhere but once set my printer started to print duplex. Next up - the fax.


Microsoft Dynamics AX 2012 Financial Management
Microsoft Dynamics AX 2012 Financial Management
by Mohamed Aamer
Edition: Paperback
Price: £24.49

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars cfoinfo.biz Book Review, 30 Dec. 2013
Preface

My relationship with AX (formerly known as Damgaard Axapta) goes back to the late-1990's when I consulted with Damgaard about their entry into the US market. In the noughties I managed two ERP selection projects that selected AX and I recently project managed an AX2009 implementation. But I'm not an AX expert. The version covered by the book is AX2012. PACKT provided me a with a free e-book review copy.

Who is this book for?

As the title suggests, the book focuses on financial management and specifically on the AX general ledger (GL), some cash and cost related topics and financial reporting. This is not the right book to read if you are focused on the sub ledgers (e.g. AR/AP), logistics and manufacturing aspects of AX as they are not within scope.

The level of detail is what I would call `consultant' level in that is it is useful for getting up to speed on how stuff works but is not at the level of detail needed to support an AX user who is trying to understand specific operational/accounting processes i.e. it is not a step-by-step training manual. There are no learning exercises in the book.

The book is also not focused on the implementation of AX2012 (although there are some sections addressing 'planning and designing') as this is the topic of another book, also published by PACKT. The book is quite short, with some 150 pages of useful content, so you could get what you need from this book on 2-3 hour plane journey.

Strengths and Weaknesses

The author covers a wide range of features and functions at a sufficient level of detail to understand the scale/scope of AX's support for the core financial functionality expected from any leading ERP general ledger module. There is good use of screenshots to situate the explanations in the application context. The book also has a useful, but incomplete, index (e.g. where's 'Infolog'?) to help you find the topics you are interested in.

Chapter 1 addresses the chart of accounts, accounting controls, posting opening balances and journals and the closing procedures. Strangely, there is no mention of the lack of support in AX for statistical accounts and while recurring journals are discussed here, reversing and allocation journals are not. And a useful 'new' function in AX2012 - 'shared financial data' - is only briefly mentioned - this topic could have done with a few more pages of explanation.

Chapter 2 discusses cash and bank management (functions shared by the AR and AP modules). Topics covered include credit limit management and bank reconciliation. Importing bank statements is discussed but not to the depth that most people would need, especially given that this is also a new feature in AX2012.

Chapter 3 discusses cashflow management with reference to AP, AR, Purchase/Sales order integration and the running of a cash flow report including the ability to forecast by 'currency requirement' (e.g. for hedging). On p.70 there is an odd inclusion of budget allocations with no clear explanation of how this fits into the cashflow topic.

Chapter 4 discusses cost management and begins with a statement 'The highest significant cost of organizations is encumbered in the inventory costing' - which may be true in organizations that manage inventory but is hardly the case in say a project-driven business. Although this section has a useful discussion of inventory item model groups, it does not provide enough detail on the configuration of posting profiles, the flow of costing transactions up the GL, backwards traceability of costing components etc. Cost management in AX, as in many other leading ERP systems, is a complex topic and this chapter really only skims the surface.

Chapter 5 focuses on a very powerful AX feature, found in many ERP systems, that of 'dimensional accounting'. However, what is actually a very simple concept, that of 'tagging' the main account code with multiple additional posting dimensions at the journal line level, is quite difficult to follow. Again, on p.109 there is a brief section on posting types and profiles which seems out of place as it is not clearly related to the dimensions topic.

Chapter 6 on Exploring Financial Reporting and Analysis is probably the least useful chapter. It is not really clearly explained how and why financial reporting from AX depends largely on integration with other Microsoft 'platform' assets such SQL Server SSRS, Sharepoint and Excel and nor does it mention other reporting options - particularly important for consolidation reporting, which is not mentioned at all - like Management Reporter.

Recommendation

If you know nothing about Microsoft Dynamics AX 2012 GL and want an introduction to the application from a financial perspective then this book is worth reading. If you are an implementation consultant unfamiliar with AX then the book should help you to get up to speed on some core GL concepts. If you are a user of the AX GL then this book will help you get a wider overview of financial management functions in AX but it will not help you to understand how to use AX in a specific business process context.

However, do not buy this book if you are interested in how AX2012 can help you manage the financials of a multi-entity, multi-national, multi-currency business that depends on intra and intercompany allocations, intercompany transaction processing, consolidation reporting and managing shared data (for example) as this title will not help you at all.


Her Brilliant Career: Ten Extraordinary Women of the Fifties
Her Brilliant Career: Ten Extraordinary Women of the Fifties
by Rachel Cooke
Edition: Hardcover

2 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Janet Todd in the seventh veil?, 24 Dec. 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Having just finished Crane's Men of War, this makes an enjoyable follow on. But Janet Todd in The Seventh Veil? Was she Ann's sister? And Messerschmitt dive bombers? I don't think Willy was into them. Still that aside, this is a fun read and highly recommended even if you do miss knicker watching at Smithdon High School. I could stare at Patience Gray's photo on p.43 for hours.


Implementing Microsoft Dynamics NAV 2013
Implementing Microsoft Dynamics NAV 2013
by Laura Nicoląs Lorente
Edition: Paperback
Price: £34.77

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Cfoinfo Book Review, 2 Dec. 2013
Preface

My relationship with Navision goes back to the mid-1990's when I helped them with their entry into the US market. During 1999-2001 I did a lot of consulting with Navision in Copenhagen on a variety of topics, including co-leading a web services project. I also installed and reviewed Navision as one of 10 apps in my 1999 Accounting Software Sourcebook - a guide to `mid-tier' ERP applications. However I'm not a NAV expert and the application has changed considerably since Navision was acquired by Microsoft and renamed Dynamics NAV. The version covered by the book is NAV 2013. PACKT Publishing provided an e-book copy of the book for this review.

Who is this book for?

As the title suggests, the book focuses on financial management including GL, AR, AP, financial reporting & budgeting and other topics such as VAT management, fixed assets, consolidation, cashflow reporting and inventory costing. This is not the right book to read if you are focused on the supply chain, jobs, HR, customer service/CRM or manufacturing functions of NAV as they are not within scope.

The level of detail is what I would call `consultant' level in that is it is useful for getting up to speed on how stuff works but is not at the level of detail needed to support a NAV user who is trying to understand specific operational/accounting processes i.e. it is not a step-by-step training manual. There are no learning exercises in the book.

The book is also not focused on the implementation of NAV, as this is the topic of another book, also published by PACKT and by the same author. However some basic setup help is provided in chapter 6.

The book is quite short, with almost exactly 100 pages of useful content, but I think that's a good thing as the massive 500-page tomes that characterise many IT books can be intimidating. You could get what you need from this book on 2-3 hour plane journey.

Strengths and Weaknesses

The authors cover a wide range of financial processes at a sufficient level of detail to understand the scale/scope of NAV's support for the core financial functionality expected from any leading SME ERP system. There is good use of screenshots to situate the explanations in the application context. The book also has a useful, but incomplete, index to help you find the topics you are interested in.

In the reporting and business intelligence section there is good highlighting of what used to be some of the analytic USPs of Navision namely the use of dimensions, flow-filters, analysis views and customisable account schedules (financial reports). Screenshots also highlight other useful functions in NAV such as the statistics panels and tight integration with MS Windows via the ribbon bars. The section on ledger entries (p26-27) is also helpful for understanding the debits and credits that NAV auto-generates `under the covers'.

The main weakness of the book in my view is the lack of a business-process approach to the NAV functionality. I don't think there is an example of single business process flowchart in the whole book, so the functionality is approached in a topic rather than a process context. Some people will prefer this but I believe that discussing ERP functionality in the context of a business process is a more useful way to understand the application and better reflects how it is actually used.

Like any book there are some niggles, which tend to be highly subjective to the reader. The book generally has the feel of being translated from another language in its use of words such as `financer' (for finance person or accountant), `foretelling' (for forecasting), `resume' (for summarize) and expressions like `so no mistakes are done' rather than `no mistakes are made'. These may be pedantic criticisms but they tend to detract from the readability for a native English-speaking reader. The introduction also has a few rather bizarre statements in it and perhaps could have done with a little more on the customisation potential of NAV and its market positioning - especially relative to its other Dynamics siblings: AX and GP.

Inevitably the book also skips over some important `generic' functions in NAV - for example the reference to `Role Centers' on page 77 that seems to come out of left field for the reader (and is also not referenced in the index). Role Centers are an important and useful piece of NAV functionality that perhaps could have benefitted from more space in the text, even though they are not strictly speaking `financial' in purpose.

Recommendation

If you know nothing about Microsoft Dynamics NAV and want an introduction to the application from a financial perspective then this book is worth reading. If you are an implementation consultant unfamiliar with NAV then the book should help you to get up to speed on the financials. If you are a user of a specific part of NAV financial management then this book will help you get a wider overview of financial functions but it will not help you to understand how to use NAV in a specific business process context.


Microsoft Dynamics NAV Financial Management
Microsoft Dynamics NAV Financial Management
by Cristina Nicoląs Lorente
Edition: Paperback
Price: £24.49

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars cfoinfo.biz Book Review, 29 Nov. 2013
Preface

My relationship with Navision goes back to the mid-1990's when I helped them with their entry into the US market. During 1999-2001 I did a lot of consulting with Navision in Copenhagen on a variety of topics, including co-leading a web services project. I also installed and reviewed Navision as one of 10 apps in my 1999 Accounting Software Sourcebook - a guide to `mid-tier' ERP applications. However I'm not a NAV expert and the application has changed considerably since Navision was acquired by Microsoft and renamed Dynamics NAV. The version covered by the book is NAV 2013.

Who is this book for?

As the title suggests, the book focuses on financial management including GL, AR, AP, financial reporting & budgeting and other topics such as VAT management, fixed assets, consolidation, cashflow reporting and inventory costing. This is not the right book to read if you are focused on the supply chain, jobs, HR, customer service/CRM or manufacturing functions of NAV as they are not within scope.

The level of detail is what I would call `consultant' level in that is it is useful for getting up to speed on how stuff works but is not at the level of detail needed to support a NAV user who is trying to understand specific operational/accounting processes i.e. it is not a step-by-step training manual. There are no learning exercises in the book.

The book is also not focused on the implementation of NAV, as this is the topic of another book, also published by PACKT and by the same author. However some basic setup help is provided in chapter 6.

The book is quite short, with almost exactly 100 pages of useful content, but I think that's a good thing as the massive 500-page tomes that characterise many IT books can be intimidating. You could get what you need from this book on 2-3 hour plane journey.

Strengths and Weaknesses

The authors cover a wide range of financial processes at a sufficient level of detail to understand the scale/scope of NAV's support for the core financial functionality expected from any leading SME ERP system. There is good use of screenshots to situate the explanations in the application context. The book also has a useful, but incomplete, index to help you find the topics you are interested in.

In the reporting and business intelligence section there is good highlighting of what used to be some of the analytic USPs of Navision namely the use of dimensions, flow-filters, analysis views and customisable account schedules (financial reports). Screenshots also highlight other useful functions in NAV such as the statistics panels and tight integration with MS Windows via the ribbon bars. The section on ledger entries (p26-27) is also helpful for understanding the debits and credits that NAV auto-generates `under the covers'.

The main weakness of the book in my view is the lack of a business-process approach to the NAV functionality. I don't think there is an example of single business process flowchart in the whole book, so the functionality is approached in a topic rather than a process context. Some people will prefer this but I believe that discussing ERP functionality in the context of a business process is a more useful way to understand the application and better reflects how it is actually used.

Like any book there are some niggles, which tend to be highly subjective to the reader. The book generally has the feel of being translated from another language in its use of words such as `financer' (for finance person or accountant), `foretelling' (for forecasting), `resume' (for summarize) and expressions like `so no mistakes are done' rather than `no mistakes are made'. These may be pedantic criticisms but they tend to detract from the readability for a native English-speaking reader. The introduction also has a few rather bizarre statements in it and perhaps could have done with a little more on the customisation potential of NAV and its market positioning - especially relative to its other Dynamics siblings: AX and GP.

Inevitably the book also skips over some important `generic' functions in NAV - for example the reference to `Role Centers' on page 77 that seems to come out of left field for the reader (and is also not referenced in the index). Role Centers are an important and useful piece of NAV functionality that perhaps could have benefitted from more space in the text, even though they are not strictly speaking `financial' in purpose.

Recommendation

If you know nothing about Microsoft Dynamics NAV and want an introduction to the application from a financial perspective then this book is worth reading. If you are an implementation consultant unfamiliar with NAV then the book should help you to get up to speed on the financials. If you are a user of a specific part of NAV financial management then this book will help you get a wider overview of financial functions but it will not help you to understand how to use NAV in a specific business process context.


The Lady Eve [DVD] [1941]
The Lady Eve [DVD] [1941]
Dvd ~ Barbara Stanwyck
Price: £3.98

5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Oriana Here I Come!, 26 Aug. 2007
This review is from: The Lady Eve [DVD] [1941] (DVD)
Ocean cruising has never interested me but if I thought I'd meet someone like the "Lady" Eve on board I'd be on that boat like a shot. Possibly Barabara Stanwyck's most captivating role, it's a delight to watch her pull geeky beer baron Hopsy's (Henry Fonda) strings as she lines him up, reels him in and then charmingly, falls in love with him. This is a role todays female stars would die for: Killer dialog, the opportunity to wind a male star round your finger, and bursting with heart. If only they had the screen power to match Stanwyck. Watch and marvel as she seduces her mark then ruffles his hair and sends him packing from her cabin. Romantic comedy was never better than this.


The Ghost And Mrs Muir [DVD]
The Ghost And Mrs Muir [DVD]
Dvd ~ Rex Harrison
Offered by A ENTERTAINMENT
Price: £11.06

33 of 34 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars What is life but love?, 26 Aug. 2007
This review is from: The Ghost And Mrs Muir [DVD] (DVD)
I challenge anyone to engage fully with this movie and not be moved to tears. Forget George Sanders in his trademark cad role - wonderful though he is. The real heart of this movie is the relationship between Gene Tierney's determined widow and Rex Harrison as the ghostly sea Captain. There's something about this etheral love that simply transcends description and touches the immortal nature of love as a meaning for life. Watch it. Get involved. But keep the tissues to hand.


Backwards and Forwards: a Technical Manual for Reading Plays
Backwards and Forwards: a Technical Manual for Reading Plays
by David Ball
Edition: Paperback
Price: £18.50

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars For screenwriters too..., 26 Aug. 2007
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
As someone who's done a masters in screenwriting and now in the middle of a PhD, I've read many of the screenwriting manuals out there and this is one of the best. It's a quick but pithy read. Much of what is recommended in this book (in 1983) is simply repeated by many others over the following two decades, but they do it less succinctly. Although targeted at playwrights, most of the content is equally applicable to screenwriting. The basic premise of the book, to work backwards rather than forwards through your script when rethinking/rewriting it, seems simple but is very powerful advice. No apprentice screenwriter sholud be without this in their library.


What is Sarbanes-Oxley?
What is Sarbanes-Oxley?
by Guy Lander
Edition: Paperback
Price: £7.99

9 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent accessible overview written by US attorney, 15 Jun. 2004
There's plenty of content on the Internet covering SOX but nothing beats a short focused book on the subject. Lander gives a good overview of the key sections of SOX and explains them in accessible language - despite being an attorney. A useful compliance checklist at the back also points out areas of applicability to foreign, private and Canadian issuers. Lots of useful advice but inevitably some might be out of date or changed by the time you read the book. So 'caveat emptor' as I believe these legal guys are fond of saying.


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