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PJ Worrall "JOSS4BIZ Podcast" (UK)
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Freddie King: Live At The Sugarbowl - DVD [1972]
Freddie King: Live At The Sugarbowl - DVD [1972]
Dvd ~ Freddie King
Price: £23.61

5.0 out of 5 stars A Have to for Freddie King fans, 8 July 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Simple. If you are a Freddie King fan or are looking to increase your blues repertoire you have to have this.


In Memory of Michael Bloomfield
In Memory of Michael Bloomfield

4.0 out of 5 stars Four Stars, 8 July 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
If you are fan of Michael Bloomfield you have to have this.


Bloomfield Michael Legendary Licks Guitar Styles Gtr Bk/CD (Guitar Legendary Licks)
Bloomfield Michael Legendary Licks Guitar Styles Gtr Bk/CD (Guitar Legendary Licks)
by Dave Celentano
Edition: Paperback
Price: £14.15

1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Great but lacked backing tracks, 8 July 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Absolutely love this book. It would have been five start but it didn't have backing tracks to practice playing over.


Foundations Of Ajax (Books For Professionals By Professionals)
Foundations Of Ajax (Books For Professionals By Professionals)
by Ryan Asleson
Edition: Paperback
Price: £31.49

6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Maybe for the Javascript shy, 4 July 2006
If you're not familiar, rusty, or, (like me), someone who gets an anxiety attack when Javascript is mentioned, this is the book to start you on the AJAX track. The reason I don't say its the definitive reference, or anything grander, is that AJAX is really a technique built around just one or two lines of Javascript. After that the book has no choice but to fill the rest of its pages with very informative Javascript examples, and some great references to development tools and techniques, that are not necessarily AJAX specific. If you are already a Javascript guru you might be better served just seeing a couple of examples on the web to introduce XMLHttpRequest() and ActiveXObject() and then jump straight in to finding an AJAX framework like Dojo, Rico or Google AJAXSLT that suits your purpose. Like JBoss at Work, where the main subject of the book seemed to also occupy less of its content, I think it will get used a lot as a reference because it does have very useful day to day stuff in it. However, I won't need to go back to it much for AJAX now I'm on the framework trail myself.


JBoss at Work: A Practical Guide
JBoss at Work: A Practical Guide
by Tom Marrs
Edition: Paperback
Price: £19.45

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Proves useful way beyond JBoss, 4 July 2006
I've had this book since it became available. I remember at the time being disappointed that it was less about JBoss and more about building a J2EE app using open source tools and techniques. However, I recently scanned my book shelf for something that might be able to help me refresh my memory on all the real, practical, aspects of enterprise Java and realised that this would do nicely.

Marrs and Davis use the creation of an ecommerce web site for a car dealership to demonstrate all the key aspects of an enterprise Java application and its deployment in to a JBoss container. Using ANT and xDoclet it demonstrates how to avoid the XML configuration nightmare that can take the pleasure out of development. It simply introduces you to the configuration steps to make container managed resources, like databases, available to web applications via JNDI. It uses Hibernate to introduce Object Relational Mapping and progresses to demonstrate how common design patterns can be reflected using these technologies.

The book is successful at condensing down the practicalities of Session Beans to just a few pages. Quite an achievement considering a lot of space is also dedicated to sensible reasoning about their use as well. If they are like me Marrs and Davis thought it was a waist of time elaborating any more as we are all waiting for EJB 3.0 anyway. I would recommend the section on JMS and MDB's. I was able to finally redesign a web application that had forced me in to managing my own threads for processing in bound messages over JMS some years ago (breaking the contract with a Tomcat container).

The other sections worth a mention are the JavaMail and Web Services which maintain the same standard. This is basically a very useful book that should be on your desk, dog eared and scribbled on, but not as a reference for JBoss.


Open Sources 2.0: The Continuing Evolution
Open Sources 2.0: The Continuing Evolution
by Chris Dibona
Edition: Paperback
Price: £21.52

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Have the stamina for the second half, 11 May 2006
Finally I am half way through this book. I never read the first version but this one is certainly the FOSS world equivalent to War and Peace (which I have never read either).

The series of essays from the who's who of technology leaders in this space will not have you exercising any new found skills. No, it is not a practical book but it does have a way of making you feel more coherently informed. The authors introduction will strike a cord with any software developer. It certainly found empathy with me when it spelt out something I have long had a problem with: "[the] universal practice of .. a hiring agreement..[encompassing]..any and all code and inventions created by the employee..belong to the company".

There is some nice ammunition for analogies. Making a cake and disintermediating technology by Chris DiBona in Chapter two is one we might have thought ourselves but never have put so simply. Jeremy Allisons A Tale of Two Standards for Chapter 3 made me realise how long I have been in this industry. This is a walk from where I started in the late 80's crusading for Open Systems to where I hope I am not ending: with Open Source.

It was not all about beating the drum for open source. Ben Laurie's chapter 4 on Open Source and Security was very sobering and raised some home truths.

I tend to judge how well a book has impressed me by the amount of high light is spread across the pages. Mathew N. Asay's Chapter 7 with a long title was glowing in the dark because I liked it so much and Bruno Souza's Chapter 4 is the best argument for Java open source software I have read.

The second half of the book looks like it might be more academic but, if you read the first half early it will bring you bang up to date with current thinking in the open source world.

In conclusion, if you have the stamina there is a lot to benefit from but if you are looking for something practical from the book it must be in the second half.


Open Source for the Enterprise: Managing Risks, Reaping Rewards
Open Source for the Enterprise: Managing Risks, Reaping Rewards
by Dan Woods
Edition: Paperback
Price: £16.50

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A JOSS4BIZ top book., 19 April 2006
Open Source for the Enterprise is a well written, articulate book aimed at IT managers that might be looking to rationalise how Open Source Software could work for their company. Where different contexts can often have similar arguments the authors managed to avoid repeating themselves too much. Claims of open source being cheaper and better than commercial software are avoided and, instead, replaced by justification for why the same capital and resources might be more productive when invested in skills and people rather than vendors.

It prepares the reader for the lack of productisation and the need to figure things out on your own. I am a fan of any ideas that help systematically assess technology and the books Open Source Maturity Model is as good an attempt as any. I also endorse whole heartedly the theme that runs throughout the whole book about acquiring and maintaining a certain set of skills. And being careful to select a core set of technologies of which expertise can be institutionalised through continual experience and reuse. As opposed to running rampant with any open source software environment.


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