Profile for Spenser Morris > Reviews

Personal Profile

Content by Spenser Morris
Top Reviewer Ranking: 1,973,083
Helpful Votes: 6

Learn more about Your Profile.

Reviews Written by
Spenser Morris "famnoz" (Swansea)

Show:  
Page: 1
pixel
Eating
Eating
by Jim Mason
Edition: Paperback
Price: £7.54

3.0 out of 5 stars Good work but doesn't really push the boundaries, 9 Feb 2012
This review is from: Eating (Paperback)
Good, solid reasoning from the dependable Peter Singer, but not a classic. It tends to confirm your understanding of the issues rather than take you forward into any new territory. I found I skipped some of the book as it started to become a little relentless and repetitive, and, for this UK reader, the US references and story-lines just took some of the edge of its enjoyment and relevance for me personally.


Rotary Men's Quartz Watch with White Dial Analogue Display and Black Leather Strap GS42825/01
Rotary Men's Quartz Watch with White Dial Analogue Display and Black Leather Strap GS42825/01
Price: £61.01

5.0 out of 5 stars Stylish and understated watch., 9 Feb 2012
Excellent quality, feels very stylish, understated with classic features. The leather strap is quite stiff to start with but you need to wear it to make the strap more supple and to conform properly to the shape of your wrist. The movement is very quiet. You won't notice it ticking away at all.


Help!: How to Become Slightly Happier and Get a Bit More Done
Help!: How to Become Slightly Happier and Get a Bit More Done
by Oliver Burkeman
Edition: Paperback

3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars It does help - in a small way - and maybe that is for the best, 3 Oct 2011
I enjoyed reading this book. As its subtitle suggests ('How to become slightly happier and get a bit more done') it consciously aims NOT to be one of those over-ambitious self-help books that threatens to change your life in seven days or something stupid like that. The book in fact takes aim at just those kinds of self-help books and does an excellent job of debunking them with nice dry humour. For example, here is Burkeman on 'The Secret' by Rhonda Byrne where he says that 'the secret' has been passed on 'to Plato, Leonardo, Shakespeare, Newton, Beethoven, Einstein and Australian daytime TV producer Rhonda Byrne. Is it just me, or is one of these names not like the others?' If you want to find a book that can walk you humorously through the maze of self-help books, fads and foibles then Burkeman is a very pleasant guide to have with you on that journey. He doesn't rubbish all self-help books - in fact he is pretty even handed in his approach. I picked up quite a few useful and manageable bits of advice from the book - as well as some useful website and further references to follow up. Overall, not earth-shattering, not a book promising a Damascene conversion to a completely new life - but you are likely to pick up some useful wisdom and a better perspective on self-improvement from reading this book - and you will enjoy Burkeman's dry with along the way..


The Rights of the Reader
The Rights of the Reader
by Daniel Pennac
Edition: Paperback
Price: £6.39

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Wise reflections on the power of stories, 11 Jan 2011
This is a very engaging read. I read it quickly in a couple of sittings. It isn't dense in style - it is light and playful in many ways, aided by Quentin Blake's excellent line drawings, and a very readable, flowing translation by Sarah Adams. However, the insights within the book about our attitudes to reading are very thoughtful and wise, especially in the adult anxiety about our children's attitude to reading when compared to their attitude to electronic media of various kinds. The book certainly re-energised my own reading again after a quiet lapse into non-reading, or rather a thin reading of non-fiction only. This book helped to me to remember once again the wonder of stories and made me realise that I had missed that deep immersion in a tale for its own sake. Pennac's experiences with recalcitrant adolescent readers and how he switches them on to reading are a little optimistic, I feel, at times. I can't quite believe that a story will unlock every adolescent mind as it lurks behind its walls of testosterone, anger and resentment. The book is not an educational textbook on reading; it is more a reflection on the power and importance of stories. The ten rights of the reader, which come towards the end of the book, are precisely right, and rather than being a set of commandments they actually are a set of axioms that set you free as a reader to approach (and leave) any story in any way you like.


Page: 1