Profile for Chadders > Reviews

Personal Profile

Content by Chadders
Top Reviewer Ranking: 695,663
Helpful Votes: 5

Learn more about Your Profile.

Reviews Written by
Chadders

Show:  
Page: 1
pixel
All in a Day's Cricket: An Anthology of Outstanding Cricket Writing
All in a Day's Cricket: An Anthology of Outstanding Cricket Writing
by Brian Levison
Edition: Hardcover
Price: £13.60

5.0 out of 5 stars The best cricket anthology I've read, 8 Jun 2014
...and I've read a few!

This is the kind of book that I have usually bought or been given as a gift since I was so high. But, three decades since my fascination with the sport and its literature began, this anthology is, by a stretch, the best collection of cricket writing I have read. Levison's range is born of a wide, wide knowledge and an ear for a finely tuned sentence. There is not a duff piece in here, and, to his great credit, it steers away from the humdrum, platitudinous "oh, my dear old thing, isn't it marvellous" rubbish that often uses up space in these collections.

I got this for Xmas, and have deliberately played a longish innings with it. There are pieces that the avid reader of the game will have come across before, but that is to be expected; Levison's skill is in managing to pick some of the best passages from already familiar books and allow you to enjoy them again. That said, there will be some really interesting new pieces for everyone. When I finished the other day, it was with some regret; I am sure Levison has the breadth for another volume.

Highly recommended for the cricket and cricket literature enthusiast.


Blood Meridian
Blood Meridian
by Cormac McCarthy
Edition: Paperback
Price: £6.29

5.0 out of 5 stars The Western as Apocalypse, 26 Jan 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Blood Meridian (Paperback)
Beyond its superb, coagulate gore and its unflinching and hellish depiction of amorality, the triumph of this novel is McCarthy's prose. It has a Biblical intensity that forces you to read this not just as an awesome anti-Western, but as some kind of treatise on our degeneration into oblivion. Sam Peckinpah said that he wanted his films to make the audience feel what it's like to get shot. Blood Meridian does this too; but then there's the scalping as well...


The A303: Highway to the Sun
The A303: Highway to the Sun
by Tom Fort
Edition: Hardcover

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Sceptical and whimsical, 26 Jan 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
I've lost count of the times I have driven the Stourhead-Honiton section of this road, as well as a fair few trips eastwards along it. You see the place names, you stop at a few, but you wonder what hides just beyond the majority of this beautiful and frustrating route. I was reminded of a John Shuttleworth song about Blatherwike (sp?) when I read his book, and vow now to detour to more of these hidden-away villages and forgotten monuments, rather than just plough on because the kids are getting tetchy.

Fort combines whimsy and obscurity well, and his mostly romantic view is tempered by an assured and timely dose of scepticism every now and then. He doesn't take himself too seriously, but despite the conscious self-effacement, he does deliver an at times beautifully written book, and makes lovely what is, after all, asphalt and concrete.


The Black Flash: The Albert Johanneson Story
The Black Flash: The Albert Johanneson Story
by Paul Harrison
Edition: Hardcover
Price: £6.40

3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Poorly edited, 15 Jan 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This book, on the surface, looks beautifully produced, with its classy, understated front cover suitably reverential for Harrison's ultimately tragic subject. And yes, there are some interesting insights concerning Johanneson's initiation into the early 60s Leeds team: for example, one is left seeing Don Revie as a man seemingly without compassion or empathy. One regrets, however, that there seems to have been little in the way of editing considered. Tens of grammatical errors have jinked by the writer, proof reader or publisher like so many Johanneson runs down the left wing. There are mis-placed punctuation marks of all kinds (scattergun commas apparently randomly inserted in places, speech marks around reported rather than direct speech), and comma splices abound. There's no kind of craft to the writing, and the narrator's voice is cumbersome and clunky to read in places; Johanneson's testimony is considerably more articulate, but its transcription is still beset by the aforementioned errors. These things matter; if you shell out for a book of this sort, you do not expect D grade GCSE errors to be strewn across its pages. In fact, the errors and the style of the prose end up detracting from the sympathetic hearing that Harrison is desperate to give his subject, and that Johanesson clearly deserves. The Black Flash is a great subject for a book; his elegance on the pitch needs reflecting in how that book's produced.


Page: 1