Profile for Ralph De Cordova > Reviews

Personal Profile

Content by Ralph De Cordova
Top Reviewer Ranking: 5,236,435
Helpful Votes: 32

Learn more about Your Profile.

Reviews Written by
Ralph De Cordova "Ralph" (Cumbria, UK)
(REAL NAME)   

Show:  
Page: 1
pixel
Ideas and Oh Dears
Ideas and Oh Dears
Offered by MERLINMOOSIKDE
Price: £8.69

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Oh dear, 28 Aug 2005
This review is from: Ideas and Oh Dears (Audio CD)
I bought this just over a week ago now, partly on the strength of the rather charming cover art and the fact I'd heard a good mention regarding this guy before.
Well, like the other reviewer I was having a fairly mediocre day but listening to this cheered me up too and made me smile like almost no other musician has done. Amongst other things that more established artists wouldn't dare dream of doing he remixes an advert for a Bristol carpet factory with hilarious consequences, observes badgers at the roadside that aren't moving, "rocks out with his Fisher Price guitar" and builds a song around a demo from a toy keyboard. And samples Furbies. Brilliant. Heck, the quote from the other reviewer - "it deals with real life issues suchs as carrier bags and fat people" - makes me chuckle even further, albeit with sadness...
I lost that CD within a day of buying it. I got to listen to it once and really enjoyed the 36 minutes it lasted, but after looking for it a couple of days later in the car it was gone (insert crying here). But don't make that mistake - buy this CD, keep hold of it and play it when you're down - I could do with it now, and some more well-known musicians could do with listening to it as well and taking inspiration by making their listeners smile too. Maybe I'll just have to order another copy now.


OK Computer
OK Computer
Offered by DVD Overstocks
Price: £4.19

4 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars No Longer Underrated, OK?, 22 April 2005
This review is from: OK Computer (Audio CD)
The Sunday before I wrote this review, "OK Computer" was voted pretty high up on a poll conducted by Channel 4 to find the best popular music album of all time... so high up, that it beat The Beatles' "Sgt Pepper", Pink Floyd's "Dark Side Of The Moon", Nirvana's "Nevermind", U2's "Joshua Tree".... oh by the way, the last of those albums on that list came second.
But is it really the best album ever? Probably not, but certainly worthy of a place in the top 10 - this album will influence bands to come and is already influencing new bands today. Whereas "The Bends" was a collaberation of U2-/britpop-/grunge-inspired rock, "OK Computer" was something never heard previously. The twelve songs (although "Fitter Happier" would be better classed as an interlude) are each unique and all of them have something to offer to the listener - be it the prog rock wonder that is "Paranoid Android"; the possessed narrative in "Karma Police" that builds up to regret when it wails "For a minute there, I lost myself"; the finger/toe-tapping, slightly punkish, yet very relevant - with the politicians getting in a right kerfuffle over the forthcoming general election (at the time I review this!) - "Electioneering"; and the simplistic yet beautiful "No Surprises", with a glockenspiel riff you won't forget in a hurry.... just to sample a few of the songs in the album.
Believe it or not, I wouldn't rate this as my favourite Radiohead album - it's only my third favourite at the moment (I prefer Kid A and Amnesiac), but the test of time may be the final judge as I have only been into Radiohead for a little under five months, and OK Computer may come out best. Either way, anyone who likes indie/alternative rock should own this album and it is the best starting point for anyone looking to get into Radiohead, as you can make your mind up if you simply like the rock side to it more or prefer the progressive, post-rock aspects, and either take the "The Bends" or "Kid A" route respectively. But one thing is for sure - I can no longer call this Radiohead underrated now they've won a "best album of all time" poll!


Hail To The Thief
Hail To The Thief
Offered by The Music Warehouse
Price: £5.00

11 of 13 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Cheering and waving, twitching and salivating at HTTT, 19 Mar 2005
This review is from: Hail To The Thief (Audio CD)
Hmmm... what can I say. This is a typically brilliant album from one of the best bands ever (although sadly I doubt this will be acknowledged when we looking back in a couple of decades) and quite simply represents a group who have their own unique style and can put tremendous variety into their work, as well as add thought-provoking lyrics and leave the rest of recent popular music in a light much worse than you've ever seen before, simply because you've discovered the greatest band of the last 20 years.
Admittedly, it will take a few listens to get into this album, as has been stated before, but patience will pay dividends and at the 20th listen you will be brainwashed into knowing who are the greatest artists of this era. Instead of liking inferior dross you will be marvelling at the wonderful evocative wails of Thom Yorke and the guitars in songs like "2+2=5" and "There There"; the piano that leads superb songs like "Sail To The Moon" (which takes a "Say 'No' to time signatures" stance) and the evil "We Suck Young Blood" (which any self-respecting vampire would have as his signature tune) as well as the bittersweet "Punch Up At A Wedding"; the riff-heavy and political (yeah Green Day, you don't have to be as subtle as a cow's arse in Antarctica to be political) "Go To Sleep"; the electronica-mad yet compelling "Myxomatosis" (spell that will you!); and finishing with "A Wolf At The Door" which - had it been released as a single - would have left mainstream nobody rappers like 50 Cent/Eminem looking like the chav at the back of the class with just his ego for a friend.
If you don't like any of Radiohead's work, be it The Bends, OK Computer, Kid A or HTTT, then you're not human.... who needs slapped*. Which reminds me, I need to slap somebody....
*The author of the above review does not advocate the use of violence against human or non-human species, although would encourage any readers to buy the above product or any products related to the band "Radiohead" from this website as a kind gesture to the hosts of this review and to your lacklustre record collection.


Some Cities
Some Cities
Offered by Quality Music UK
Price: £7.99

11 of 12 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Says something when you're told this "isn't their best"..., 19 Mar 2005
This review is from: Some Cities (Audio CD)
This is my first taste of Doves, and "Some Cities" has certainly proved an enjoyable album to listen to over the past week (and perhaps, even, for a few weeks to come).
"Some Cities" opens its namesake album, and is fairly enjoyable even if it doesn't aspire to much. It then merges into the next track - "Black & White Town" - which has a pacey piano-riff and a thumping drum that sends it along nicely - this is arguably the best track on the album and it's no surprise it has been released as the first single. "Almost Forgot Myself" maintains the upbeat start to the album and has a 60s feel and proabably owes something to the bands of that era such as The Kinks. Snowden - which looks to be the second single from "Some Cities" - has twinkly guitar riffs and blaring oriental-style bursts which build up to the song's climax, ending in a climbing mountain of sound which justifies the track's name.
Here, a break from the summery beginning comes in the form of "The Storm", built around a movie-score sample with strings-infested melancholy that works rather well, and is certainly one of my favourite tracks on the album.
The album then returns to its previous state - albeit with a slightly darker side - with the songs "Walk In Fire" and "One Of These Days", the latter sounding like the perfect anthem for a summer festival. "Someday Soon" mixes somber vocals with a hopeful guitar/flute-like instrument riff to good effect. "Shadows of Salford" is a favourite of mine but is probably not very accessible - sounds depressing on the first listen, but creates a ghostly atmosphere with a creepy piano, vulnerable vocals and bursts of 'ooh! ooh!' that collaborates to make a somewhat unsettling but pleasant song. Hmmm....
The penultimate track is "Sky Starts Falling", a fast moving track which features an ongoing stomp that returns to the upbeat flavour heard earlier on but with a bit of angst thrown in. The final track is "Ambition", a nice, typically calming and soothing closer that completes the album well.
"Some Cities" is a pleasure to listen to, and while it lacks the killer track which will be memorable in a decade's time, it doesn't have a weak song - as a result, I have found the entire album to be enjoyable and will consider getting some of Doves' back catalogue as I've heard from others that this isn't their best. Well, they must be pretty consistent at writing good songs if that's the case!


Some Cities
Some Cities
Offered by Quality Music UK
Price: £7.99

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars They must be good if this "isn't their best"..., 19 Mar 2005
This review is from: Some Cities (Audio CD)
This is my first taste of Doves, and "Some Cities" has certainly proved an enjoyable album to listen to over the past week (and perhaps, even, for a few weeks to come).
"Some Cities" opens its namesake album, and is fairly enjoyable even if it doesn't aspire to much. It then merges into the next track - "Black & White Town" - which has a pacey piano-riff and a thumping drum that sends it along nicely - this is arguably the best track on the album and it's no surprise it has been released as the first single. "Almost Forgot Myself" maintains the upbeat start to the album and has a 60s feel and proabably owes something to the bands of that era such as The Kinks. Snowden - which looks to be the second single from "Some Cities" - has twinkly guitar riffs and blaring oriental-style bursts which build up to the song's climax, ending in a climbing mountain of sound which justifies the track's name.
Here, a break from the summery beginning comes in the form of "The Storm", built around a movie-score sample with strings-infested melancholy that works rather well, and is certainly one of my favourite tracks on the album.
The album then returns to its previous state - albeit with a slightly darker side - with the songs "Walk In Fire" and "One Of These Days", the latter sounding like the perfect anthem for a summer festival. "Someday Soon" mixes somber vocals with a hopeful guitar/flute-like instrument riff to good effect. "Shadows of Salford" is a favourite of mine but is probably not very accessible - sounds depressing on the first listen, but creates a ghostly atmosphere with a creepy piano, vulnerable vocals and bursts of 'ooh! ooh!' that collaborates to make a somewhat unsettling but pleasant song. Hmmm....
The penultimate track is "Sky Starts Falling", a fast moving track which features an ongoing stomp that returns to the upbeat flavour heard earlier on but with a bit of angst thrown in. The final track is "Ambition", a nice, typically calming and soothing closer that completes the album well.
"Some Cities" is a pleasure to listen to, and while it lacks the killer track which will be memorable in a decade's time, it doesn't have a weak song - as a result, I have found the entire album to be enjoyable and will consider getting some of Doves' back catalogue as I've heard from others that this isn't their best. Well, they must be pretty consistent at writing good songs if that's the case!


Page: 1