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B. DONNELLY (London, United Kingdom)
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Maths Countdown Game Free
Maths Countdown Game Free
Price: £0.00

1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Great concept ruined by disastrous execution., 31 Mar 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Maths Countdown Game Free (App)
The frequent and randomly timed appearance of adverts ruins this game, which might otherwise get 3 or even 4 stars. Aside from the ads and the lack of an option to purchase an ad free version, the interface is prohibitively messy, in that it's not intuitively clear how to apply arithmetic operations to previous answers vs beginning a separate calculation.

This could have beena fantastic app, but as it is, it's a disaster.


Timeshaft
Timeshaft
Price: £2.72

4.0 out of 5 stars Fresh and unpredictable, 6 Mar 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Timeshaft (Kindle Edition)
Full of original ideas, whilst playfully exploring the much loved sci-fi concept of pre-destination paradoxes, Timeshaft keeps throwing surprises at you right to the climax when everything comes together, with plenty of references to the familiar influences of HG Wells, Doctor Who and Star Trek. The tongue-in-cheek revelations at the very end are perhaps just far-fetched enough to snap you out of the detailed universe that Stewart Bint has created, but the story is complete by then and the joke can be appreciated.


The Room (Kindle Tablet Edition)
The Room (Kindle Tablet Edition)
Price: £0.69

5.0 out of 5 stars lots of fun. You'll wish there were so much more of it., 26 Oct 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Really well made. The kind of thing I could spend weeks on, though it'll likely only take you an hour or two. :)


SCRABBLE
SCRABBLE
Price: £2.99

0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars faithful to the boardgame, options to play friends or AI, 26 Sep 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: SCRABBLE (App)
More or less everything you want in a Scrabble game. You can play on your own or with friends. I haven't explored the dictionaries available yet but it appears similar to my friend's ipad app which uses the limited TWL dictionary instead of the proper SOWPODS one. The teacher can give unfair advantage for a subsequent turn if you still have most of your letters still available, but those are minor criticisms.


Fallacy of Fine-Tuning, The: Why the Universe Is Not Designed for Us
Fallacy of Fine-Tuning, The: Why the Universe Is Not Designed for Us

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Not for the mathematically faint hearted, but all the more rewarding for it., 24 Mar 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
If you can follow all of the mathematics behind the arguments, you probably know enough not to be blown away by them, but if, like me, it's a bit of a struggle for you to keep up, there's a massive temptation to either take the author's word, or to write it off as misdirection, depending your stance at the beginning of the book. On the other hand, if you bear with it, you just might see the substance behind a very strong case for a universe that need not explain itself.


Big Babies: Or: Why Can't We Just Grow Up?
Big Babies: Or: Why Can't We Just Grow Up?
Price: £4.12

4.0 out of 5 stars DELIGHTFULLY RANTY CRITIQUE OF SOCIETY, 16 Mar 2013
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Well thought out with some choice words, this carefully planned wake-up call to the world wears the disguise of a spontaneous improvised monologue, but soon sweeps you away in a stream of ideas of - wait a minute, why am I reviewing this? You're all grown-ups and can decide for yourselves what to read.


QI: The Second Book of General Ignorance
QI: The Second Book of General Ignorance
Price: £4.19

3.0 out of 5 stars A worthwhile sequel., 29 Dec 2012
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Plenty of fascinating material here, and as entertainingly written as the first. However it suffers from lacking punch due to most of the big Klaxon-bait questions having already been used, and so there are far fewer moments of taken-for-granted knowledge being shockingly swept away.


Fear in the Sunlight (Josephine Tey)
Fear in the Sunlight (Josephine Tey)
by Nicola Upson
Edition: Paperback
Price: £11.14

1 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Fear in the Sunlight reviewed by Angela Singer, 14 July 2012
Fear in the Sunlight by Nicola Upson. Published by Faber.
THIS is Cambridge author Nicola Upson's fourth thriller inspired by the life of Josephine Tey, a celebrated author and playwright of the 1920s and 1930s.
In this book, Josephine meets Alfred Hitchcock and his wife Alma who want to make a film of her book A Shilling for Candles. He made it as the film Young and Innocent. As with much of his work, the movie was so different from the book that the authors didn't have to feel violated.
In real life, the meeting may well have been scary. Alfred Hitchcock enjoyed playing cruel tricks on people. In the novel, their summer rendezvous in the holiday village of Portmeirion in Wales is riven with ritualistic murders.
The book continues the lives of the characters created for the first three novels, including the (until now) unresolved Lesbian love affair between Josephine and her friend Marta. Though Nicola Upson's stories are set in an earlier age, they are perfectly right for this one. A gay affair doesn't mean colourful dresses and tea.
Once again, with fine writing and an intricate, lacework plot, Miss Upson has created a world of intrigue that is so engrossing you are reluctant to leave it. Her denouement twists are always exciting and surprising. I felt sad after I finished the book because I missed it.
Angela Singer


Two For Sorrow
Two For Sorrow
by Nicola Upson
Edition: Paperback

3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars chilling from beginning to end and will haunt you long after you have read it. Review by Angela Singer., 31 Oct 2010
This review is from: Two For Sorrow (Paperback)
Two for Sorrow by Nicola Upson, published by Faber and Faber. Review by Angela Singer.

This book is chilling from beginning to end and will haunt you long after you have read it. The opening chapter, one of the most powerful in the English language describes the day that a woman is hanged.

She is a despicable creature, a "baby farmer" who murdered the little ones in her charge, having taken money from newly delivered mothers assuring them that the child would be placed for adoption. She can walk cold-bloodedly carrying a dead baby along the streets of London . She can sit in a cafe, drinking unperturbed with the dead child on her lap - yet even that does not ameliorate the horror of the hanging, the state deliberately destroying a life - even that life.

Nicola Upson's third detective novel has her heroine, the real-life author and dramatist Josephine Tey, writing a novel about the Finchley baby farmers, Amelia Sach and Annie Walters, who were hanged at Holloway Prison on February 3, 1903. As Josephine researches this book, other murders happen around her, of young women working in the theatreland of London in the 1920s, where these novels are set.

Josephine and her friend, the dashing Inspector Archie Penrose, Upson's own creation, unravel a connection between the hanged women and the new murders a generation later. Upson, with her compelling and delicate writing style, layered onto meticulous research of the history and the period - she actually trod in the footsteps of the hanged women - creates for her readers a doorway into a lost world.

Extraordinary as the events in this book are, they are told with such detail that they are absolutely credible. The book holds your attention to the end and never fails to surprise.


An Expert in Murder (Josephine Tey)
An Expert in Murder (Josephine Tey)
by Nicola Upson
Edition: Hardcover
Price: £11.11

15 of 20 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An Expert in Murder by Nicola Upson. Review by ANGELA SINGER, 5 Mar 2008
THIS first novel - and the start of a detective series - by arts writer Nicola Upson is a real page turner. The clues as to who has done the murder are kept close until it all unfolds at the end. Then it all opens up like the flowers on the cover.

Set in the theatreland of the 1930s and written in a lavish 1930s-style, the novel opens with a young girl, Elspeth Simmons being murdered on a train.

Elspeth is modelled on many a real-life theatre devotee of the time. The real Elspeths would have seen their favourite plays several times. This is fiction but set against historical facts. Elspeth is on her way to see Richard of Bordeaux by Josephine Tey, which ran for 463 performances at the New Theatre (now the Noel Coward Theatre) in St Martin's Lane.

To research the book, Upson interviewed people who knew Josephine Tey, including the actor John Gielgud.

Elspeth has a boyfriend who works at the theatre. She is travelling to meet him when she is stabbed in a railway carriage at King's Cross.

We are introduced to Detective Inspector Archie Penrose, the only man who can solve the mystery.

You can tell that Nicola Upson spent the 1990s as marketing manager of the Arts Theatre in Cambridge. She has a droll way of describing how news of the second murder - in a theatre dressing room - was received by the actors.

"Theatre is a self-obsessed medium at the best of times, but this was not the best of times....Gradually it filtered backstage, where certain members of the company experienced the uncomfortable sensation of talking about something other than themselves. They dealt with the novelty in different ways and according to type."

Set between the two world wars, there are also insights into how ordinary people had helped the war effort between 1914 and 1918.

One of the characters in the novel describes how May Gaskell started sending books out to soldiers, beginning when Gaskell's son-in-law was wounded in the Boer War.

"She sent him books and magazines to distract him from the misery of it all. Apparently, it's what got him through, so May decided on the first day of war that British soldiers in France would never be without stories to take their mind of the suffering. She was in her sixties by then but she was a remarkable woman and well connected enough to make it happen. She persuaded somebody to lend her a house in Marble Arch and turned it into a book warehouse. People sent things in from all over the country. One day we'd get dirty packets of rubbish from Finchley, the next, thirty thousand volumes from a country house would turn up.

"People were donating entire libraries. On a good day, the vans bringing in the books blocked the traffic all round Marble Arch. We sent them to hospitals all over the world, not just France."

Later the project was taken over by the Red Cross.

The book creates a quaint, past world with sufficient detail to make the novel enticing and haunting but the pace is fast enough for the reader to grip it tightly to the end.

An Expert in Murder by Nicola Upson is published by Faber and Faber at £12.99.


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