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G. Richardson (U.K.)
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Aquostic (Stripped Bare)
Aquostic (Stripped Bare)
Offered by Fine Drop
Price: £4.30

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Masterpiece!, 10 Dec. 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
I bought my first Status Quo album in 1974 and others since but this is the best yet. Who would have thought that after all those years the best was yet to come? Apparently Rossi and Parfit were "sh*****g themselves before they performed it live for the BBC but they needn't have worried - an expertly produced series of songs - flawless! Whether they like it or not, Status Quo have made a proper grown up album, a masterpiece.


UFO Down: The Berwyn Mountain UFO Crash
UFO Down: The Berwyn Mountain UFO Crash
by David Clarke
Edition: Paperback
Price: £8.99

4 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars It went bang in the night!, 20 Aug. 2010
In Andy Roberts' own words: "The legend of the Berwyn Mountain UFO crash is a mystery" and in the four decades (almost) since it occurred that mystery has been embellished and expanded upon, much by the addition of unsubstantiated evidence and testimony. How do we discern between fact and fiction, truth and hysteria in the mysterious events that occurred on a bleak Welsh hillside on a cold January night in 1974? Truly a difficult task which is made even more arduous by the almost "snowballing effect" of the evidence, enlarged by the accumulation of non-factual information and glamourised by those researchers who are determined to solve the mystery with an exotic, not of this World, explanation.
However, Andy Roberts has done just this, he has managed to differentiate between fact and fiction, truth and folklore, in a logical and methodical manner. It would be difficult to imagine how any genuine researcher could argue with the factual and reasoned approach Andy has taken in writing this book - qualities that are sadly missing in most UFO literature.
There are no false claims in this book, no surmising or attempts to introduce "anonymous eye-witness" accounts. Every element of the series of events that happened on that lonely hillside in the Berwyns uplands is analysed, substantiated and justified with rigorous research and this book may well become a classic study of long-standing Ufological mystery.
There is absolutely no doubt that there was a massive disturbance in those lonely hills and a nurse and her two daughters really did observe a "large, pulsating light" on the dark moors but what caused these strange events?
Well, read this book. It is certainly the best analysis of the case that is available and perhaps it also provides a template or format that will aid the investigation of other UFO incidents.
This is one of those books that once started is difficult to put down. It is also an absolute must for all UFO researchers, regardless of nationality.


The Ring of Bright Water Trilogy: Ring of Bright Water, The Rocks Remain, Raven Seek Thy Brother
The Ring of Bright Water Trilogy: Ring of Bright Water, The Rocks Remain, Raven Seek Thy Brother
by Gavin Maxwell
Edition: Paperback
Price: £11.24

10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Beautiful Myth, 3 Jan. 2008
It seems a long time ago that I first read Gavin Maxwell's trilogy of books relating the development and eventually the destruction of his idyllic existence on the West Coast of the Scottish Highlands.
Despite the fact that I was just a teenager coping with all the excitements and problems that period of life engenders, Gavin Maxwell's descriptions of life in a simple house located on the sea shore of a remote bay made such an impression on my eager young intellect, an impression that has never been subdued or diminished by time or cynicism.
Maxwell was not, in my humble opinion, a great author but his books "Ring of Bright Water" and the subsequent "The Rocks Remain" and "Raven Seek Thy Brother" remain classics of the Twentieth Century.
This trilogy of books has, by necessity, been edited down somewhat to facilitate them being published as a single book and in my mind this does detract from the originals.
This compilation emphasises the nurturing wild otters as pets yet allowing them to live, as near as possible, an existence which at least had similarities to life in the wild. To me the original trilogy was as much about conceiving and attempting to build a dream as the rearing and welfare of adopted wild otters which had been orphaned by man's pointless lust for blood.
I am just one of the many whom, after reading Maxwell's books, had a deep yearning to travel northwards and to discover that storm-blasted, shell sand bay wherein his primitive house, Camusfearna, stood. I have never been to the exact location but I am pleased that I did not become one of the "disciples" that innocently yet selfishly caused more harm to that environment than they could have foreseen.
Apart from describing the sheer joy of living in what at times was almost "Heaven on Earth", The "Ring of Bright Water" Trilogy does contain the elements of melancholia, disappointment and depression caused by the realisation that Camusfearna was (in Maxwell's own words) a myth, an unobtainable illusion. Gavin Maxwell spent a great deal of his life living with the Marsh Arabs in Iraq and it is ironic that an old Arabic proverb sums up his life and dreams so well - "Beware of that which you desire for you shall surely receive it".
Yet despite this, Maxwell's accounts of life on a desolate yet beautiful stretch of Scottish coastline still fill my mind with wonder; I still want to be there, all of the time.


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