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first ya gotta Shake the Gate [Explicit]
first ya gotta Shake the Gate [Explicit]
Price: £11.99

3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Sensationally good!, 17 Dec. 2014
Funkadelic is back! And again by far the most creative band around, bestowing upon us no less than thirty-three-pieces! I personally consider fourteen of them absolut masterpieces,an incredible score! Fulfllls every pre-requisite to conquer the world. May the force be with you! Oh sweet Jesus....
Comment Comments (4) | Permalink | Most recent comment: May 4, 2015 5:40 PM BST


Illuminati Manifesto of World Revolution (1792): L'Esprit des Religions
Illuminati Manifesto of World Revolution (1792): L'Esprit des Religions
by Nicholas Bonneville
Edition: Paperback
Price: £14.90

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Outstanding Work of Serious Scholarship on the Illuminati's Involvement in the French Revolution!, 27 July 2012
Luchetti doesn't merely present Bonneville's treatise but he also provides the reader with 370+ pages explaining the historical context of this important document and thereby delivers the first scholarly work that uncovers in detail the influence the Bavarian Illuminati had on the French Revolution.
It is important to understand that the Illuminati didn't invent the plan of the French Revolution the idea of which rather was exported to the Illuminati in Bavaria. They merely reimported back to France a new and improved formula, providing the French revolutionaries with a manual of techniques capable of actually pulling off the Revolution.
Important channels of that Illuminati influence were: i) the 20 Mesmer lodges of Illuminati Mesmer, founded as Illuminati covers in France and never affiliated with true Freemasonry; ii) Bonneville's Cercle Social; iii) the Chevaliers Bienfaissants' Templar system centred in Lyons which was linked a) to the Illuminati's headquarters at Munich known as Lodge "St. Theodore au Bon Conseil", affiliated with the CB Templars of Lyons, and b) to the "Amis Réunis" at Paris the members of which represented the highest power echelons of France. It's Grandmaster, Savalette de Langes, was an Illuminati since 1787. The oath of all these templar lodges was to destroy the Bourbons (viz. "the lilies") and the power of the Pope/Rome. By 1779 there was established an alliance between the French Templars' headquarters at Lyon, the Amis Réunis at Paris and Weishaupt's Bavarian Illuminati. Members of the Amis-Réunis of Paris as of 1789 were: Sièyes, Talleyrand, Condorcet, Mirabeau; Danton, Dumouriez; Robespierre, Marat, Beaumarchais, Laclos, Mercier, Saint Just, Babeuf, etc.. Among the Illuminati counted important players such as Mirabeau, Condorcet, the Duke of Orléans, Paine, Lafayette, Cagliostro and Duke Ferdinand of Brunswick.
As for the Brissotins/Illuminati (dubbed "Girondins" by Desmoulins as a propaganda trick used against them), they were responsible for the revolutions of 1789 and August 1792. Then the revolutionary movement was hijacked by Robespierre and his Montagnards through their June 2nd 1993 revolution. The Brissotins/Illuminati stood for atheism, laissez-faire and libertarian (sic!) communism whereas Robespierre defended theism, state socialism and economic intervention to be brought about by what he named "despotism of liberty". The Brissotins/Illuminati were against the September 1792 massacres, against killing the king, against the 1793 dechristianization and the terreur in general. Robespierre persecuted them and set into motion his genocidal policies bent on killing millions of Frenchmen, as testified by atrocities like, e.g., the eradication of Lyon or the extirpation of the Vendée. The Robespierrists thereby revealed themselves to be true pioneers of later communist revolutions.
Not the least of Luchetti's merits lies in reminding us of "serious" historians who have endorsed Secret Societies' importance within the French Revolution (e.g.: Louis Blanc, Henri Martin, Bord, Cochin, Gustave Martin, Kropotkin, Mathiez). Moreover, Luchetti's erudition on the French Revolution and profound familiarity with the research done by historians is absolutely stunning.
Hopefully Luchetti will share more of his vast knowledge in future works!


Illuminati Manifesto of World Revolution (1792)
Illuminati Manifesto of World Revolution (1792)
Price: £7.48

5.0 out of 5 stars Outstanding Work of Serious Scholarship on the Illuminati's Involvement in the French Revolution!, 27 July 2012
Luchetti doesn't merely present Bonneville's treatise but he also provides the reader with 370+ pages explaining the historical context of this important document and thereby delivers the first scholarly work that uncovers in detail the influence the Bavarian Illuminati had on the French Revolution.
It is important to understand that the Illuminati didn't invent the plan of the French Revolution the idea of which rather was exported to the Illuminati in Bavaria. They merely reimported back to France a new and improved formula, providing the French revolutionaries with a manual of techniques capable of actually pulling off the Revolution.
Important channels of that Illuminati influence were: i) the 20 Mesmer lodges of Illuminati Mesmer, founded as Illuminati covers in France and never affiliated with true Freemasonry; ii) Bonneville's Cercle Social; iii) the Chevaliers Bienfaissants' Templar system centred in Lyons which was linked a) to the Illuminati's headquarters at Munich known as Lodge "St. Theodore au Bon Conseil", affiliated with the CB Templars of Lyons, and b) to the "Amis Réunis" at Paris the members of which represented the highest power echelons of France. It's Grandmaster, Savalette de Langes, was an Illuminati since 1787. The oath of all these templar lodges was to destroy the Bourbons (viz. "the lilies") and the power of the Pope/Rome. By 1779 there was established an alliance between the French Templars' headquarters at Lyon, the Amis Réunis at Paris and Weishaupt's Bavarian Illuminati. Members of the Amis-Réunis of Paris as of 1789 were: Sièyes, Talleyrand, Condorcet, Mirabeau; Danton, Dumouriez; Robespierre, Marat, Beaumarchais, Laclos, Mercier, Saint Just, Babeuf, etc.. Among the Illuminati counted important players such as Mirabeau, Condorcet, the Duke of Orléans, Paine, Lafayette, Cagliostro and Duke Ferdinand of Brunswick.
As for the Brissotins/Illuminati (dubbed "Girondins" by Desmoulins as a propaganda trick used against them), they were responsible for the revolutions of 1789 and August 1792. Then the revolutionary movement was hijacked by Robespierre and his Montagnards through their June 2nd 1993 revolution. The Brissotins/Illuminati stood for atheism, laissez-faire and libertarian (sic!) communism whereas Robespierre defended theism, state socialism and economic intervention to be brought about by what he named "despotism of liberty". The Brissotins/Illuminati were against the September 1792 massacres, against killing the king, against the 1793 dechristianization and the terreur in general. Robespierre persecuted them and set into motion his genocidal policies bent on killing millions of Frenchmen, as testified by atrocities like, e.g., the eradication of Lyon or the extirpation of the Vendée. The Robespierrists thereby revealed themselves to be true pioneers of later communist revolutions.
Not the least of Luchetti's merits lies in reminding us of "serious" historians who have endorsed Secret Societies' importance within the French Revolution (e.g.: Louis Blanc, Henri Martin, Bord, Cochin, Gustave Martin, Kropotkin, Mathiez). Moreover, Luchetti's erudition on the French Revolution and profound familiarity with the research done by historians is absolutely stunning.
Hopefully Luchetti will share more of his vast knowledge in future works!


Evil and/or/as the Good: Omnicentrism, Intersubjectivity and Value Paradox in Tiantai Buddhist Thought (Harvard-Yenching Institute Monograph Series)
Evil and/or/as the Good: Omnicentrism, Intersubjectivity and Value Paradox in Tiantai Buddhist Thought (Harvard-Yenching Institute Monograph Series)
by Brook Ziporyn
Edition: Hardcover
Price: £38.95

5.0 out of 5 stars T'ien-T'ai's "unbuddhist" Buddhism, 28 Nov. 2009
T'ien-T'ai's "unbuddhist" Buddhism
In his learned and inventive work Ziporyn presents us with a philosophy practically unheard-of in the West. T'ien-T'ai's enlightenment perceives reality neither as just "mundane" nor as transcendent in the more (Zen) or less ("separate teaching") exclusive sense of "beyond", but rather as immanent transcendence grounded in samsara. Therefore, only the "provisional" can incarnate the ultimate and only "provisional" words can convey the "unspeakable", employing them allegorically so that even fairy tales can express some particular aspect of the Middle Way.
Ziporyn choses the model of setup/punch line as a metaphor for the Lotus-Sutra's supreme marvel to "open up provisional" words/reality as dwelling place of the ultimate. But life is largely not funny at all. Given the terrible suffering in this world, how could Buddhas, who always suffer when seeing others suffering, not view samsara as one monumental tragedy?!
Zhili maintains the impossibility of attaining pure goodness arguing that there's nothing but evil, the realization of which is itself the good. I believe T'ien-T'ai wouldn't agree to that. Instead he ascribed very specific psychological and behavioural qualities like compassion to Buddhahood. If there didn't exist a tenth substance endowed with distinguishing qualities, why then 100 worlds? Ninety would do just fine, adding to each of the nine deluded worlds a tenth state of aggregation which would correspond to Zhili's enlightened "dung-beetle-hood" (= wickedness).
As for the 100 worlds, imagine ten different substances that can manifest themselves in ten different ways, just like water can appear in various states of aggregation, and you get 100 worlds, each of which comprising ten "categories" and "three realms of existence" (= 3000). Apart from assuming different states of aggregation, the ten worlds can also migrate from one to another, thereby changing from latency to manifestation and vice versa.
Ziporyn seems to endorse Zhili's position that poison (greed, anger etc.) are identical with medicine (contendedness, compassion etc.), that delusion is identical with true understanding and that good is identical with evil. Or, as Ziporyn puts it somewhere else, that Hitler's extermination of the Jews could be validly considered ("contextualized") the action of a Bodhisattva seeking to free the world from what he/she believes to be harmful to its well-being.
Obviously, the relationship between good and evil and its "identity", "oneness" or "mutual inclusiveness" is so profound a matter that T'ien T'ai calls it elusive and ultimately transcending word and principle. The world's foremost contemporary scholars like Paul Swanson remain dubious as to the question what really distinguishes the "separate" (or "specific") teaching from the "perfect" teaching. The following passage of a Japanese teacher may provide some clue: "According to the provisional teachings and the schools based on them, both good and evil remain in one's life through all the stages of the bodhisattva practice up to the stage of near-perfect enlightenment. Hence people at the stage of near-perfect enlightenment or below have faults of some kind, [but not those at the highest stage]. In contrast, the heart of the Lotus school is the doctrine of three thousand realms in a single moment of life, which reveals that both good and evil are inherent even in those at the highest stage of perfect enlightenment." Accordingly, and in a sense differing from Ziporyn's understanding, the most horrible evils are indeed an inseparable aspect of our intrinsic nature even when we are enlightened, and vice versa: when manifesting our devilish nature, we are but deluded Buddhas, and when manifesting our buddhahood we are nothing but enlightened devils. Analogously, there is a clear difference between a Bodhisattva (or a Buddha, for that purpose) applying lethal force to combat evil (war) and - keeping within the before mentioned example - Hitler (supposedly) killing in order to protect humanity from a (supposed) evil. The former would be, let's say, the world of Ashura experienced within the world of bodhisattva (the "9th"), whereas the latter would be the world of bodhisattva experienced within the world of Ashura (the "4th). As one can see, the mutual possession/inclusiveness of the ten worlds taught by T'ien T'ai entails two different levels never to be confused (sic!): a (traditional) "vertical" level stressing the axiological differences between the ten worlds, forming a hierarchy. And on the other hand a "horizontal" level with no axiological difference between the ten worlds. Meaning that each of the ten worlds can manifest themselves in ten different ways according to which is the dominant "theme". All of the ten worlds can manifest themselves within the world of Buddhahood. It appears that both Zhili and Ziporyn confused these two levels, thereby dramatically misunderstanding the essence of T'ien T'ai's teaching.


9/11 Synthetic Terror: Made in USA
9/11 Synthetic Terror: Made in USA
by Webster Griffin Tarpley
Edition: Paperback

13 of 16 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Welcome to Reality Surreal!, 5 Oct. 2009
It all comes down to this: "How can we be sure Webster's claims are true?", indeed a very good question since readiness to doubt is the essence of reason itself. BUT: This principle cuts both ways unless it's just exploited to ward off inconvenient ideas. In fact, with every page you turn you will ask yourself with ever-growing anxiety: "How can I be sure that this guy is not wrong?" Moreover, bypassing the whole question about the veracity of Tarpley's assessment: Even IF this book's scenario wouldn't apply to our current political situation, it most definitely shows how our democracies CAN be destroyed from within. Hence this work, with all its abundance of political scholarship, experience and wisdom, deserves to be read by EVERY concerned democratic citizen. The events unfolded by Tarpley are so utterly monstrous they recall a scene in "Matrix" where "Morpheus" tries to convince Neo that the world is in reality the Matrix. All of us, particularly US-citizens, should very carefully consider the fact that their country has already turned into a police state, that apparently one million (!) (as to March 2009) of their fellow citizens are on the "Terrorist Watch List" ("No Fly List"). George W. Bush, by his own grace, granted the American President dictatorial powers should certain circumstances arise he himself defined, namely "... any incident, regardless of location, that results in extraordinary levels of mass casualties, damage, or disruption severely affecting the U.S. population, infrastructure, environment, economy, or government functions." (original quote from "NSPD 51"). Even Adolf Hitler depended on the German Parliament to grant him similar powers through the "Enabling Act" in 1933. Bottom line: the stage is set for the next 9/11 to bring martial law. Crazy stuff, isn't it?


Bach: Transcriptions
Bach: Transcriptions

6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Sovereign of his instrument, 5 April 2007
This review is from: Bach: Transcriptions (Audio CD)
It was this CD that drew my attention to Cyprien Katsaris whom, astonishingly, I hadn't heard of before. And it is this CD that since then I cherish as one of the most beautiful I ever bought.

Among all these many wonderful pieces you will find, some stand out in particular, both in terms of composition and of pianistic performance.

Firstly, we have a most enchanting version of the Gavotte from BWV 1006, where Katsaris decided to add his own arrangement to that of Rachmaninov and Fiedman.

Then, there's a Largo from BWV 1005, transcribed by no one less than Saint-Saens.

Furthermore, Katsaris plays Kempff's transcription of BWV 645 so wonderfully polyphonically, that he even leaves behind Kempff himself.

And finally there is Katsaris' arrangement of the Badinerie from BWV 1067. The listener has to take this little prank as humorously as Katsaris himself intended it to be, but even then it has its own charm. But what is more, here Katsaris really shows what he has in his sleeve technically. Even though you may be tired of the Badinerie and even though you might not be impressed by mere virtuosity, this little technical showcase Katsaris prepared leaves anything behind I ever heart before. It's as if two or even three guys were playing the thing, and with their hands full.

But don't get this wrong: Katsaris is not just the foremost of those innumerable technicians there are today and who nevertheless lack that magical touch, the soul or spirituality, or however you may call it, that really makes the artist and what really touches us in music.

No, of course Katsaris is to be considered a true artist and a great one.

But apart from that, I consider him the greatest virtuoso of all living and deceased pianists I ever listened to. Of course, there is Michelangeli, there is Richter, and evidently many more, but none of them conveys this impression of such total and boundless control over the piano. Whatever Katsaris does, it doesn't seem to cost him any effort. So instead of calling him a genius, he rather deserves the title of sovereign of the piano.


Bach: The Conductors' Transcriptions [Hybrid SACD]
Bach: The Conductors' Transcriptions [Hybrid SACD]
Price: £14.13

4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Magnficent! Awe inspiring! Fantastic!, 3 April 2007
This Slatkin and BBC performance on the conductors transcriptions takes off exactly from where these artists left us with their CD on the composers transcriptions. Which is in Bach heaven!
Among the many many beautiful transcriptions, the pieces Woods transcribed as a 6th orchestra suite, how he puts it, stand out particularly, where he chose to apply to an fully assembled orchestra pieces like preluds from the well-tempered piano, for instance.
As the other above mentioned CD, this one is awefully well recorded. I don't know how they did it, but I never heard anything acustically so overwhelming than these two CDs, (and my CD collection is quite big). And this is especially interesting, since I don't (yet) even own a SACD-player, which this hybrid CD is actually aiming at.
Maybe it is due to this aspect than in some moments I feel there is still (!) more acustic potential on the CD than my stereo is capable of rendering. Or maybe just a still better high-end stereo would do the job. But let us not forget that the search for the perfect equipment musn't overshadow our capability of simply enjoying music. This is all the more true when I, (or shall I say: we?) think of those junk stereos of my / our youth which were nevertheless able of transporting me / us into states of wonder and perfect bliss.
So I cannot recommend enough this item, remarkable in terms of composition, performance and recording tecnics.
In the end, one cannot but praise again the performing artists. The BBC orchestra reveals itself a first class group of musicians.
I don't know whether the most marvelous instrumentation of all the pieces is entirely due to the transcribers, or if maybe Slatkin intervened in the choice of instruments. Anyway, Slatkin surely deserves to be praised for this most delightful CD!


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