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chalithra (Berlin)

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English Tea Shop Peppermint Fairtrade and Organic Loose Tea 100 g
English Tea Shop Peppermint Fairtrade and Organic Loose Tea 100 g
Price: £5.29

2.0 out of 5 stars Nice box, average tea, 16 Oct 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Contrary to everyone else here it seems I think this is a below average quality loose peppermint tea, and I've had much better ones in the past. I would not buy it again.


1 pc Goji Berry & Coconut Milk Soap 100% Natural Handmade approx.120g
1 pc Goji Berry & Coconut Milk Soap 100% Natural Handmade approx.120g

5.0 out of 5 stars Just great!, 25 Aug 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This is an amazing soap which I use for my hair as well as my skin. It leaves my skin very soft and my long, curly hair looks healthy, shiny and the frizz is gone. I would recommend it to people with normal to dry hair/skin or for using it during the winter months. The smell is very subtle, which I like. In comparison to my other (natural) soaps it does not lather as much (which I personally don't mind, but some people might). I have tried several different soaps now, and this one is my new favourite. I am definitely going to come back for more!


Tunnel Blanket
Tunnel Blanket
Price: £6.49

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars It might be for you - or not, 24 May 2014
This review is from: Tunnel Blanket (MP3 Download)
I have found this to be one of the albums with the most profound effect on me during the last few years, but I hesitate to recommend it to everyone. It is very idiosyncratic and different from their less introspective & drone-like, more uplifting earlier releases. Hence, before you buy this make sure you know what you're getting, especially if you only know e.g. Young Mountain, or else you might end up disappointed. Maybe this is just one of those albums which is either entirely for you - or not at all.


Faith in Nature Jojoba Conditioner 400ml
Faith in Nature Jojoba Conditioner 400ml
Price: £5.29

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Ugh - that smell, 19 Sep 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This is the second conditioner by Faith in Nature I have tried (the other one being the Hemp Conditioner) and it will be my last one. I have used organic products on my hair for years, but none of them had a comparable stench. I really find it remarkably disgusting, especially since the smell stays in the hair for a while. The result regarding my hair on the other hand is quite good, but I get the same result from other products (I use Lavera and Sante for instance, unfortunately they are hard to come by). I have lost my faith and will not try any other products of this brand, because the two I have tried smell very similar; a stinging smell of old lemon.


Abnormal, Clinical and Forensic Psychology with Student Access Card
Abnormal, Clinical and Forensic Psychology with Student Access Card
by Dr David A Holmes
Edition: Paperback
Price: £42.39

2 of 4 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Shortcomings, 10 May 2013
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After studying psychology with a specialisation in forensic psychology for several years in a different country I came across this book. It's a riddle to me how everyone else could possibly praise it or recommend it to anyone. It is utterly uncritical towards everything contemporary mainstream psychology and, while proposing that several opposing theories and challenging views are merely radically wrong and/or narrow-minded (e.g. 'sociology', which is being named in one go with scientology and everything anti-psychiatry is basically put on a level with psychoanalysis), it is itself manipulative and reckless in it's attempt to disencourage each and every kind of thoughtful reflection, it mixes undifferentiated criticisms and charlatanry. If the cautious reader looks up terms like 'Anti-Psychiatry' he or she might find this movement at least in general has little to do with parapsychology or radical ideologies. For instance we find on the Wikipedia:

'Controversy has often surrounded psychiatry, and the anti-psychiatry message is that psychiatric treatments are ultimately more damaging than helpful to patients. Psychiatry is often thought to be a benign medical practice, but at times is seen by some as a coercive instrument of oppression. Psychiatry is seen to involve an unequal power relationship between doctor and patient, and a highly subjective diagnostic process, leaving too much room for opinions and interpretations. Every society, including liberal Western society, permits compulsory treatment of mental patients.

Psychiatry's history involves what some view as dangerous treatments. Electroconvulsive Therapy was one of these, which was used widely between the 1930s and 1960s. A brain surgery called lobotomy was another practice that was ultimately seen as too invasive and brutal. In the US, between 1939 and 1951, over 50,000 lobotomy operations were performed in mental hospitals. Valium and other sedatives were over-prescribed, which led to an epidemic of dependence. There was also concern about the significant increase in prescribing psychiatric drugs for children.

Three authors came to personify the movement against psychiatry, and two of these were practicising psychiatrists. The most influential of these was R.D. Laing who wrote a series of best-selling books, including The Divided Self. Thomas Szasz rose to fame with his book The Myth of Mental Illness. Michael Foucault challenged the very basis of psychiatric practice and cast it as repressive and controlling. The term "anti-psychiatry" was coined by David Cooper in 1967.

Divergence within psychiatry which generated the anti-psychiatry movement in the 1960s and 1970s, is still present. Freedom versus coercion, mind versus brain, nature versus nurture, and the right to be different, remain contemporary issues. Some ex-patient groups have become militantly anti-psychiatric, often referring to themselves as "survivors" rather than patients.'

Furthermore, Critical Psychology has produced some very interesting and noteworthy concepts, even though (or exactly because?) it is rooted in Marxism.

According to the author of this book, psychology is (wants to be?) a hard science. In my opinion psychology is never only a hard science, no matter what some hardliners want us to believe. We are human beings, social beings, and yes, political too: a reality Karl Popper was able to acknowledge. What is happening today is that psychology is losing it's theoretical hold by trying to ignore where it came from, what it does and what for. People are getting ahead of themselves when epistemiological foundations are threatened to be forgotten. This book does absolutely nothing to help in this respect. As psychologists we have a responsibility after all, and we better try stopping to deny it - preferably before we become instruments to some kind of inhumane policy. Especially since morality is a core idea of justice and the legal system. It cannot be alienated from forensic psychology without emptying the whole concept into nothingness.

Besides it can never be wrong to at least listen to what people with other ideas have to say. There is so much to learn and there is so much to know beyond mainstream psychology. Read the sociologists and the philosophers. They deserve to be read.

If you want to learn about forensic psychology this book is ok, but I'd rather recommend Dennis Howitt or Graham M. Davies, informative books, which won't try to manipulate you into believing their own political agenda.


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