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John Hepburn (London)
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Introducing Evolutionary Psychology
Introducing Evolutionary Psychology
by Dylan Evans
Edition: Paperback

5.0 out of 5 stars Short and sweet, 18 Oct. 2007
If you only have a couple of hours spare in your life, and you'd like a quick, fun (and fully illustrated) introduction into one of the hottest (and occasionally, most controversial) areas in psychology today, this may be the book for you. Standing against the creationist beliefs of Intelligent Design, and at a slight tangent to writers like Stephen J Gould it covers a range of topics from evolutionary psychology's core beliefs, to its take on mating, parenting, social groups and brain functions and onto facets of language and human personality traits. Stimulating stuff and a fairly solid base of knowledge before you launch into one of the heavier tombs.


Neuro-Linguistic Programming For Dummies
Neuro-Linguistic Programming For Dummies
by Romilla Ready
Edition: Paperback

10 of 12 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Solid introduction to NLP, 18 Oct. 2007
Clear minded, competent and enjoyable introduction to NLP. The basics are advanced in a simple, well-rounded manner and there are plenty of activities to challenge and refine your thinking and behaviour. Possibly it's greatest achievement is that the later ideas and activities (which are often called 'more advanced' in other books) flow beautifully and logically on in an engaging and stylish manner. As with 'CBT for Dummies' (which acts as an almost complementary companion) it's a book I often recommend to clients in the appropriate circumstances. Well worth purchasing.
Comment Comment (1) | Permalink | Most recent comment: May 17, 2008 6:43 PM BST


Cognitive Behavioural Therapy For Dummies
Cognitive Behavioural Therapy For Dummies
by Rob Willson
Edition: Paperback

44 of 47 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An excellent introduction to the topic, 19 July 2007
In my professional life, much of my time is spent working through a client's peceptions. And where appropriate, this is one of the starting points I suggest for learning about the self-evaluation of thinking, emotions and behaviour.

Beautifully written, engaging, thought-provoking and well worth considering if you're interested in learning more about this approach.


Just Six Numbers: The Deep Forces That Shape the Universe (SCIENCE MASTERS)
Just Six Numbers: The Deep Forces That Shape the Universe (SCIENCE MASTERS)
by Sir Martin Rees
Edition: Paperback
Price: £8.99

5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars One universe or many?, 30 Jun. 2007
What an excellent book!

Martin Rees looks at six facets of the universe, and considers how changing any one of these parameters would lead to a very different type of universe to the we can see (and infer) all around us.

He explains complex ideas beautifully and elegantly. He helps the reader wonder if this universe was designed for our purposes (sorry chaps, we're not that important), or whether we evolved to take advantage of the conditions that were available.

And the logical extensions to his thinking and writing are really quite breathtaking. Has our universe expanded and crashed many times? Or is our view of just one universe simply limited and parochial? And if there are many universes, how would they form and what would they look like?

Rees using mathematics, physics and some creative and highly enjoyable thinking to talk us through these ideas.

And the idea that there is no chance of us being here?

Well ...you're almost right. But there's at least one universe full of difference between no chance and almost no chance ...

Makes you think, doesn't it?


Magic Universe: A Grand Tour of Modern Science
Magic Universe: A Grand Tour of Modern Science
by Nigel Calder
Edition: Paperback
Price: £16.54

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A beginners guide to scientific fun, 30 Jun. 2007
Nigel Calder offers up a clear, concise, interesting and insightful tour of some of the big issues in science today. He takes the reader on a rollercoaster journey through psychology, physics, biology and paleontology - covering a diversity of topics from the Big Bang, black holes and brain images, onto the Cambrian Explosion and primate behaviour and including Time Machines, Superstring Theory and much, much more.

Chapters are linked together by ideas, and handy cross referencs are provided throughout the book. As Calder's work unfolds the reader develops a gradual idea of how different facets of science link together.

If you have read (and understood!) Stephen Hawkins, Richard Dawkins and Robert Winston, this book may prove too superficial to really challenge your thinking.

In contrast, The Magic Universe is more like a chunky magazine or a really good set of newspaper articles than a book.

With that in mind, if you're looking for a relaxed and enjoyeable introduction to a diveristy of scientific topics, you won't go far wrong with this choice.


A Brief History of Time (Illustrated)
A Brief History of Time (Illustrated)
by Stephen Hawking
Edition: Hardcover

7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A picture explains a thousand words., 18 Jun. 2007
I'm a scientist, but not a mathematician or a physicist. I have, like many people, an educated layman's knowledge of the universe and am keen to learn more.

As such, I rely on popular versions of some hard thinking to access and enjoy my interests. Reading through the original version, I hit treacle about two thirds through and (from what I'm told) missed a fine climax to an excellent book.

This is different. I've often thought that a great mind can tie together complex ideas and information in a clear and simple way.

This is the result of a truly great mind. It's beautifully written, simple, concise and (although it still requires an investment of thought and time) is far more accessible.

I thoroughly enjoyed it and would recommend it to anyone interested in this area.


Cognitive Behavioural Therapy For Dummies
Cognitive Behavioural Therapy For Dummies
by Rob Willson
Edition: Paperback

58 of 61 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An excellent introduction to CBT, 18 Jun. 2007
In my professional life, much of my time is spent working through a client's peceptions. And where appropriate, this is one of the starting points I suggest for learning about the self-evaluation of thinking, emotions and behaviour.

Beautifully written, engaging, thought-provoking and well worth considering if you're interested in learning more about this approach.


Star Maker (S.F. MASTERWORKS)
Star Maker (S.F. MASTERWORKS)
by Olaf Stapledon
Edition: Paperback
Price: £7.99

29 of 32 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Sitting on hills: an occupational hazard worth considering?, 18 Jun. 2007
So one evening, you are relaxing on a hill near your home ... looking at the stars and contemplating the complexities of the universe.

Soon you have left your own body and are drifting through the universe, searching from planet to planet and seeking the answers to the universe's ultimate questions. And just out of interest, why you and not someone really important like George, Tony or that chap from Fingermouse?

Stapledon takes the reader on a galaxy spanning adventure where we watch the central character struggle to use their very human perception to understand all they encounter. And of course, being human it's equally important to grasp and evaluate the lost grain of ones own life.

Not as deep and sonorous as 'Last and First Men' - but far pacier and more uplifting - this is another fine offering from Stapledon that builds towards a truly awe inspiring conclusion.

And is it just me, but was Fingermouse's demise just a little too disturbing for children's tv? The revenge of a weary traveller?


Last And First Men (S.F. MASTERWORKS)
Last And First Men (S.F. MASTERWORKS)
by Olaf Stapledon
Edition: Paperback
Price: £8.99

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Sombre vision from a master of perspective, 18 Jun. 2007
Ever wondered where our species is heading? Onwards and upwards towards a glorious future? Or hurtling down into an abyss of our own short-sighted making?

In the dark days of the early twentieth century, Stapledon wrestled with these issues and advanced a plausible, thought-provoking and measured interpretation of our evolution over the next two billion years. This is not Star Trek and the universe of the galaxy spanning empire. Rather this is a universe constrained by physics and the sheer magnitude of the distances involved: a universe where triumph and disaster are treated as long term travel companions rather than the impostors of Kipling.

Would I recommend it? Well that depends on the reader and what they are looking for. If you're after an exciting story, perhaps it would be better to look elsewhere.

But if you're interested in the slow march of time Stapledon advances something very different and, for me, truly extraordinary here ... a view of the future that is both spectacular in its breadth and heart wrenching in its final conclusion. You won't be excited and gripped by the pace and challenge. But something else is at work here. Something subtle, perspective shifting and ultimately moving. It's a gentle opera with deep themes and the ability to place our own worldview into a very different context....

And I first read it as a child twenty years ago ... and it still echoes today. How many books can do that?


The God Delusion
The God Delusion
by Richard Dawkins
Edition: Paperback
Price: £6.29

23 of 33 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Thank God for giving us the wisdom not to believe in God?, 16 Jun. 2007
This review is from: The God Delusion (Paperback)
In a world that seems to revel in shadows and mirrors, Dawkins turns on the torch of evidence based thinking and shines it on all those who would rather be left in ignorance. Dawkins cuts through the idea of blind faith and shows it for what it is: a weapon for the unscrupulous and deluded and a comfort blanket for the intellectually lazy, confused, gullible and weak minded. Creationist thinking is laid bare on the hard rock of science and the world is a better place for it.

And it will make you think! Exactly what would a psychological profile of the lord of the Old Testament look like? Would we be impressed? Would an intelligent designer/ god really build DNA in such a way that simple humans could interfere and tamper with it to achieve our own, often merely cosmetic ends? Universal trust in human motives? Poor creativity? Lack of divine foresight? Or just an immortal off-day?

Overall? An excellent book. In some respects, it doesn't matter whether you believe the central argument or not: It's engaging, thought provoking and full of interesting anecdotes, theories, information and evidence that certainly made me feel all the richer for reading it.

Saint or sinner? Either way ... buy it!


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