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Paul Floyd (Grenoble France)
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21st Century C: C Tips from the New School
21st Century C: C Tips from the New School
by Ben Klemens
Edition: Paperback

4 of 8 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Bad C, 31 Jan. 2013
I got as far as "int main() {" and then I gave up.

The author ought to get himself a copy of Harbison and Steele (and perhaps the ANSI/ISO standard), and brush up on his C. Otherwise there's another Herb Shildt in the making.


Shrek The Third (Shrek 3) [DVD] (2007)
Shrek The Third (Shrek 3) [DVD] (2007)
Dvd ~ Mike Myers
Offered by Entertainment Direct
Price: £3.60

4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Quite a disappointment, 15 Nov. 2010
I suppose that if you are a US child in "junior high" then this film might well appeal to you. Otherwise I don't see the appeal. A few of the gags work well, but otherwise this is just a run of the mill rites-of-passage story, US style, set to the Shrek background.

My advice is to stick to Shreks 1,2 and 4.


An Introduction to GCC
An Introduction to GCC
by Richard M Stallman
Edition: Paperback
Price: £12.95

7 of 14 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Lightweight overview, 27 Nov. 2007
This review is from: An Introduction to GCC (Paperback)
Criticisms:
Suggests using LD_LIBRARY_PATH when linking dynamic libraries. Mentions rpath, but says that it is a bad idea. Personally I am 100% of the opposite opinion. LD_LIBRARY_PATH is bad news and should be avoided whenever possible. rpath and $ORIGIN are much superior. No mention that LD_LIBRARY_PATH is not portable (e.g., to Windows or MAC OS X).
The treatment of warning options is skimpy to say the least.
-g is the only debug option described.
The description of the compilation process omits IR entirely.


The Design and Implementation of the FreeBSD Operating System
The Design and Implementation of the FreeBSD Operating System
by Marshall Kirk McKusick
Edition: Hardcover
Price: £49.99

4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A book that you can read, 22 Aug. 2007
Well, well, well. This was a surprise - an OS book that I could actually sit down and read. Not full of bullet lists, flow charts, screen shots and source code. Just for that, I have to take my hat off for the authors. My only criticism is that I think that the book could have done with a few more diagrams.


The Algorithm Design Manual
The Algorithm Design Manual
by Steve S. Skiena
Edition: Hardcover

1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A pleasant read, 22 Aug. 2007
I read this book whilst on holiday (had my laptop with me, but managed not to turn it on).

The first part is a gentle intoduction to algorithms. There's little or no mathematics, but the concepts are well covered. The second part is the catalog, which seemed to live up to its name.


C++ Templates: The Complete Guide
C++ Templates: The Complete Guide
by David Vandevoorde
Edition: Hardcover
Price: £47.49

4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Good mix of theory and practice, 22 May 2007
Truly a very good book.

Part I covers the basics. In particular, I found chapter 6 useful. I've not seen any other source of information on the machanisms of template instantiation that most of the C++ compilers available use.

Part II covers more advanced template usage, like template template parameters. Again, chapter 10 on Instantiation is very much grounded in practical use.

Part III moves on to idioms and the usage of templates. I found chapter 18 of particular use (for numerical computing with matrices, leading to Blitz).

The final part of the books covers techniques like type traits, smart pointers, tuples and functors (in the same vein as some of the boost libraries).


C++ Programming with Design Patterns Revealed
C++ Programming with Design Patterns Revealed
by Tomasz Muldner
Edition: Paperback
Price: £38.99

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A bit of a hidden gem., 16 May 2007
I've read all of the C++ classic books. In the early chapters, I thought that this one would be an "also ran". After a slow start, the book does get going into a nice coverage of the language. I think I'm a bit too much of an "advanced" user to have learnt much from such an introductory/intermediate text, though I wish I could have read a book like this back when I was learning C++.

The coverage of Design Patterns is a little bit shallow. I think that the architectural apsects could have been elaborated a bit more, and the examples a bit more involved.


Managing Projects with GNU Make: The Power of GNU Make for Building Anything (Nutshell Handbooks)
Managing Projects with GNU Make: The Power of GNU Make for Building Anything (Nutshell Handbooks)
by Robert Mecklenburg
Edition: Paperback
Price: £18.02

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Highly readable and practical, 16 May 2007
When I read this book, I was looking at a build system that's based on GNU make that has been ill maintained for quite some time. So I had several "how can I do this?" questions on my mind.

This book helped me improve my understanding of GNU make a lot. I own and have read the 2nd edition of the book (which isn't specific to GNU make). I found this edition considerably clearer - probably at least partly due to it being better focused on the tool that I use. This extra knowledge should aid me to solve most of the problems that we're having.


Step into Xcode: MAC OS X Development
Step into Xcode: MAC OS X Development
by Fritz Anderson
Edition: Paperback
Price: £37.08

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars A big struggle, 16 May 2007
I'm a little bit biased. I'm not particularly interested in learning Objective C (I've been programming C and C++ for the better part of 20 years, and I don't particularly want to learn another one-platform-only dialect). Since much of the book is tutorial in nature, this means that I spent a lot of time typing in code that I didn't much understand. It felt a bit like my early experiences with C++ and the VisualAge C++ environment.

So, I could forgive all that. What I didn't like is that on several occasions, I just couldn't get things to work (one time I resorted to deleting the project, anc copying the code for the chapter from the CD). Usually this was because I made little mistakes. However, xcode would build the app without complaining. Then I'd get runtime errors (or crashes). So I wasn't too impressed with xcode/Objective C in this respect. In a few places, there are differences between the code printed in the book, and the code on the accompanying CD. The code on the CD is split into snapshots, say, for chapter 7, there are ch7_1, ch7_2 and ch7_3 directories (CD at home, so the real names might be a bit different). It is very unclear as to exactly which pages these directories correspond.

I did learn to navigate around xcode better, and picked up a few tips on using it, so I didn't entirely waste my time/money.


Mac OS X Internals: a Systems Approach
Mac OS X Internals: a Systems Approach
by Amit Singh
Edition: Hardcover
Price: £58.99

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Enormous book!, 16 May 2007
This is the biggest book I've ever read. Perhaps half a dozen others have topped 1K pages. But at 1600 pages, this is the biggest. The sheer weight of it makes it uncomfortable to hold for any length of time, so best read it at a table.

The author works for IBM, and there is a lot (in fact, I'd say excessive) of coverage of the IBM PowerPC 970 chip. There is some Intel CPU coverage, but it doesn't permeate the book as the 970 does.

I enjoyed the intro to Mac history - I don't have a strong Mac background.

The main reason that I don't rate this book highly is that it dwells too much on the lowest level. There is a great deal of coverage of the boot process. Code is analysed step by step. I'd have like to have seen more abstraction and description of the higher level architecture.


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