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S. Hayman "constant reader" (northern england)
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Parent's Guide to Preventing Homosexuality
Parent's Guide to Preventing Homosexuality
by Joseph Nicolosi
Edition: Paperback
Price: £10.24

3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars is this a joke?, 27 Nov 2012
i'm not sure i can believe a reputable bookseller, real world or internet, would actually have the stupidity to stock such an item - it it is really what it says it is. is it a sophistocated joke? if not, why not have alongside it A.Hitler's guide to ensuring your children are purebred, or the Spanish Inquisition guide to disciplining children? seriously - deeply offensive, utterly specious - amazon, you should be ashamed of yourself. and i've only given it a star because amazon won't let me proceed unless is do so. it deserves none.


The Dancer
The Dancer
Price: £1.53

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars a page turner, 3 Jan 2012
This review is from: The Dancer (Kindle Edition)
Not my usual genre at all - i read The Dancer because a friend had suggested it. but i have to admit i was gripped by the plot - Aldridge is a story teller, no mistake. She blends history and historical personalities with the fiction and the characters she has so vividly imagined, and brings to life for us. as soon as i finished it - which necessitated one very late night! - i was driven to seek out the history, and check up on one very clever last minute plot twist; ingenious! The Dancer has also made me want to visit the region and go over the journey made by Brother Francis, The Crowman, Jared and of course the Dancer. yes, i recommend it.


New Version TrendyDigital WaterGuard Waterproof Case for Kindle 1, 2,3 (First, Second and Third Generation Kindle), Blue Border
New Version TrendyDigital WaterGuard Waterproof Case for Kindle 1, 2,3 (First, Second and Third Generation Kindle), Blue Border

1.0 out of 5 stars poor quality - product and seller, 1 Nov 2011
i bought one of these in August. the one drawback of them is that once you've got the kindle in the bag, it's fiddly and difficult to slide the 'on' button. you could turn it on before putting it in, but i often have a delay between being in the risky environment and starting to read. So i've been trying to make sure i move it around inside so i don't always manipulate the button at the same point in the bag. nethertheless, after less than three months, it's split along the seam. and, more importantly, when i wrote a reasonable, friendly mail to ask if i can return it, i've had no response. at all. nada. zip. zilch. so i advise you to find another waterproof cover for your kindle, which is what i'm doing having written off the £12plus i've spent on this, with great annoyance.
Comment Comments (2) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Jan 20, 2012 12:17 PM GMT


Special Places to Stay in Britain for Garden Lovers (Alastair Sawday's Special Places to Stay)
Special Places to Stay in Britain for Garden Lovers (Alastair Sawday's Special Places to Stay)
by Alastair Sawday
Edition: Paperback
Price: £11.86

10 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A green thought in a green shade, 26 Mar 2011
What do you look for in a B&B, hotel or cottage, for a weekend or longer? I know what I DON'T want - trouser presses, mini bars and uniformity. It's why I tend to use the various Alastair Sawday guides, for quirky and individual places. Places I know will be comfortable, run by people with a passion for what they do and able to welcome, cosset and often inspire me. And occasionally I find myself searching for a certain specific something; wouldn't it be lovely to stay on a vineyard, or to be able to take the dog? Above all, wouldn't it be fine to stay somewhere with a fabulous garden? To know I could wander around someone else's private plot, sit under their wisteria and smell their roses, take notes on their plantsmanship, to be welcome to do so...and not have to mow the lawn!? Special Places to Stay in Britain for Garden Lovers is the latest in Sawday's special guides and it introduces a swathe of B&Bs, holiday cottages and hotels with green fingered owners and acres of well kept, burgeoning borders and lawns, some with ponds and waterfall, potagers, and glades. Reading this on a cold, misty, drear day with just the hint of spring in the air, pages and pages of gorgeous gardens was just too tantalising. I've been to one of these places and it is as outstanding as the description suggests, which just makes me want to go discover others in this book. As well as tempting you with the promise of Tudor knot gardens, violet-strewn dells and tables set for breakfast or an evening drink under jasmine and honeysuckle, each entry gives recommendations for gardens nearby to visit, and a gardener's tip. Did you know that conkers deter moths and spiders or that cayenne pepper protects tulip bulbs from voles? I suspect you'd come home from a stay in any of the recommended houses with notes, cuttings and the irresistible desire to start digging.


French Châteaux and Hotels Special Places to Stay (Alastair Sawday's Special Places to Stay French Chateaux & Hotels)
French Châteaux and Hotels Special Places to Stay (Alastair Sawday's Special Places to Stay French Chateaux & Hotels)
by Alastair Sawday
Edition: Paperback

9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Abbeys in Ariege, chateaux in Charente, 22 Sep 2010
We've just got back from France - 14 days, 5 absolute gems to stay in and every one of them gleaned from the pages of an Alastair Sawday guide. If you'd prefer to go for one stop shopping for your holidays and book it all through a bland company, well fine. But you won't get to stay in a Benedictine Abbey dating from the 900s, with vaulted ceilings and glistening floor tiles. Or a 1930s auberge rescued from decay by a couple who took their baby and a passion for cuisine terroir from London to the mountains of the Haute Loire. Or a whitewashed inn run by a sommelier from Lille who won it in a contest. Fabulous food, delightful settings, castles and turrets and beams. And the extraordinary thing is that half the time you're paying no more or even less than you'd pay in an anodyne, anonymous Eurohotel. And when you do opt for luxury and opulence, it's worth every penny. If you only read this book it will transport you; use it, as we have done, and it's a ticket to paradise. This is the updated version - the 6th edition apparently. There are some places I'd spotted before now missing, and quite a few new additions. Not sure why some go - all I can say is that after several years of booking holidays using Sawday guides I'd trust their recommendations.


Raise Happy Children: Teach Yourself 2010 (Teach Yourself General)
Raise Happy Children: Teach Yourself 2010 (Teach Yourself General)
by Glenda Well And Doro Marden
Edition: Paperback
Price: £8.61

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars brilliant book, 22 Sep 2010
As an agony aunt, i'm always looking for books to recommend to the people who write to me and this one has jumped onto the top of my pile for any parent. it's comprehensive, it's wise and witty, it's easy to read and easy to put into practise. Want a way to manage tantrums? Tips on dealing with sibling rivalry? ideas for coping with difficult issues such as death and bereavement, sex drugs and rock and roll? it's all here, from two experienced practitioners who are also parents. terrific book - should be in any and all parent's homes.


French Vineyards (Alastair Sawday's Special Places to Stay)
French Vineyards (Alastair Sawday's Special Places to Stay)
by Patrick Hilyer
Edition: Paperback

10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars another glass of wine, please..., 25 Oct 2009
Over the years we've had our share of glasses of wine on various patios in France, gazing across vineyards and at chateaux. We've also stopped at far-too-numerous to name wine producers, from the little to the grand. Oh, the number of times we would have loved to have stayed; to watch vines being grown and harvested, to be at the centre of the production of France's glory... Well, here it is; the latest in Alastair Sawday's Special Places to Stay, and this time it's more than personal - it's delectable and delicious and definitely in bon gout! French Vineyards gives you the chance to stay not only in the wine regions but with the producers, in B&Bs, in chateaux and in gites. And each entry comes complete with tasting notes of a wine that could be on offer and suggestions of food to have it with, too. Some are palatial, some are more basic - all sound divine. There are young winemakers, restoring or carrying on family businesses and older, retired couples or individuals who have found a new lease of life and a late blossoming vocation in what might have been a hobby. There are French winemakers and British ones too. All clearly share three things; a love of wine, a passion for sharing that love, and a flair for hospitality. If you've ever travelled through France and wanted to do more than taste briefly, and pass on by the vineyards dotting the landscape - this is the book for you. As always with Sawday's places, my only problem is which to choose, which to choose....


Scotland (Alastair Sawday's Special Places to Stay Scotland)
Scotland (Alastair Sawday's Special Places to Stay Scotland)
by Alastair Sawday
Edition: Paperback

5.0 out of 5 stars Save the planet, holiday in Scotland!, 18 Oct 2008
There are so many good reasons to holiday in Scotland these days. There's your conscience - think of your carbon footprint, and stay in the UK. But you don't have to be altruistic; there's the scenery, the food, the lovely people...and the fabulous castles, manses, country houses and crofts you could stay in and explore. Don't know where they are? Have I got a book for you! A newcomer to the Alastair Sawday stable is Special Places to Stay in Scotland, and it makes wonderful fireside reading even if you hadn't planned to dust off the tweeds and head north. After reading it, I bet you will though. How about 'Heaven in the Highlands with stunning valley and mountain views'? Or 'a castle built on solid rock 200 feet above crashing waves'? Or a magical pile 'one mile up a rutted drive, soundproofed by 175 acres of lush Stirlingshire'? You can find a croft for 2, or a castle for a dozen and all sound simply scrumptious and come with the Sawday stamp of being unusual, interesting and genuine. If you'd prefer to explore somewhere nearer to home than the Maldives, take a hint and buy this book. It won't exactly break the bank and neither will most of the places reviewed here. But they may start a trend of finding the beauty, rest and recuperation we all long for on a break nearer to home. and if you're into mysteries and haven't read a Sawday guide before, join the club in seeking the joker in the pack; there's always one place that is a flight of fancy. Though sometimes you have to search for it - it might drive you insane...


French Hotels & Chateaux (Alastair Sawday's Special Places to Stay)
French Hotels & Chateaux (Alastair Sawday's Special Places to Stay)
by Susan Luraschi
Edition: Paperback

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars claw foot baths and pepperpot turrets, 26 Mar 2008
We used to drive through France, gazing at all those palatial Châteaux, elegant Maisons, lush Domaines, Grande Hotels and intimate little Relais and Auberges, and wonder how on earth you got to know about them. Holiday companies never have such gems on their books and none of the guides seem to go for places of character or charm. You might be guaranteed a trouser press or a kettle to make instant coffee in your room but is that what you want when visiting France on holiday? Me, I want canopied beds or a vaulted dining room or a view over a millpond, complete with fish and herons. Then a few years ago, we discovered Alastair Sawday. French Bed and Breakfast in one hand, French Holiday Homes in another we've addressed the delightful task of planning that year's holiday many a time. But still it nagged - B&B is wonderful, self catering is grand, but how do you find a hotel that comes up to the Sawday exacting standard? And then - zut alors! He and his team did it again. French Hotels and Chateaux precisely plugs the gap. Want to stay in a 16th century manor house with deer and coypu in the grounds, sleep in a wrought iron bed and bathe in an old-fashioned claw foot bath? Or a 10th century pepperpot turret, with a canopied bed? Or off a cobbled street in old Rouen, with a view of Gothic marvels? Here are luxurious and decidedly pricy palaces side by side with small, reasonably priced inns, city haunts and rural retreats. All share one thing - they are anything but banal. They have beauty, buzz, elegance and that little bit of French je ne sais quoi. Owners pay to be in a Sawday guide but they can't buy their way in. All are checked by the editors. We've been using the guides for years and never been disappointed. This updated guide to French Hotels and Chateaux is the business. It's jam-packed with luscious treats - I can't wait for our summer holidays!

The only problem you might have is deciding whether to first choose your area - Picardy, Poitou-Charentes, midi-Pyrenees or even department - Tarn-et-Garonne, Var, Creuse - and see what is available there. There will be something, never fear. Or leaf through and pick on particular place and find the area you will be visiting that way. We've done both with Sawday and always bit the jackpot. You may find yourself burning the midnight oil or hitting the coffee. And speaking of which, do join Sawday aficionados in looking out for the joke entry; every guide has one. As for me - we've already booked 3 places for a fortnight's tour in September. So tough, if one of them was your choice!


French Holiday Homes (Alastair Sawday's Special Places to Stay)
French Holiday Homes (Alastair Sawday's Special Places to Stay)
by Ann Cooke-Yardborough
Edition: Paperback

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Sawday your way across France, 8 Nov 2007
In our family, "to Sawday" is a verb; it means to stay somewhere delightful, quirky and characterful. Last holiday we Sawdayed our way across France, using his `French Bread and & Breakfast" and "French Hotels, Chateaux and Other Places" to find us four utterly delicious, unusual, and very different places to linger. We've learnt from experience to trust a Sawday recommendation - we've never been let down, in many years of use. If you're a fan of independent travelling and haven't encountered Alastair Sawday before, you're in for a treat. If you have, you'll know the score. His latest, French Holiday Homes, is as good as the rest. B&Bs and hotels are wonderful to stay in, en France. But nothing quite beats the pleasure of self catering, when you can get up when you like, sit on your own terrace and drift down to the nearest market to construct a meal from the freshest and best tasting ingredients, usually bought straight from the producer. That's where a gite, a cottage, a manor house, château or chalet comes in - just perfect for a holiday on your own, with friends or family. French Holiday Homes is chock full of tiny cottages for two and palatial châteaux for 16 and any size in between. In fact, if more than 20 of you wanted to holiday together several places in this collection could oblige. You can find a farmhouse in Aquitaine which will provide a mature English lady to baby-sit as well as buckets and spades, sterilisers and bicycles for up to 8 plus 2 cots - ideal for two families or one large one with a granny or two in tow, or a dinky retreat for two in the Alps. You can sleep in what was once a monastery's bread oven, at the end of a long lane in the Loire, or in a converted pigeon loft by a lagoon where fish jump, coypu nest and kingfishers, terns and herons fish. Seven are Green Entries - places which have taken special care to be green, using sustainable energy and other measures to be eco-friendly. And one is the joker - as Sawday aficionados have come to expect. One entry is always a leg-pull...but you'll have to find it yourself. It says it sleeps 306, but I'd take that with a pinch of salt! All in all, a book I'd thoroughly recommend. The only problem you'll have is deciding which of the dozen places you gasp over on first scan will be yours for a week next year.


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