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Locke [DVD]
Locke [DVD]
Dvd ~ Tom Hardy
Price: £7.00

5.0 out of 5 stars CAVIAR TO THE GENERAL, 27 Aug 2014
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This review is from: Locke [DVD] (DVD)
Imagine a pebble that has been tumbled slowly, out of Wales, down the centuries, by a Herefordshire stream and you may have an inkling of the smoothness of the voice of Tom Hardy as Ivan Locke in this brilliant creation by writer and director Steven Knight: enhanced by a great ensemble chorus; the hypnotically beautiful photography of Haris Zambarloukos; and the music of Dickon Hinchcliffe. The whole edited and honed to perfection by Justine Wright, to complete an exceptionally beautiful movie.

In the audio commentary (itself a model of restraint) Steven Knight acknowledges in the name of his main character "a nod to the philosopher John Locke, a rationalist." In the context of the commentary we know what he means, but John Locke was an Empiricist not a Rationalist, and that too is appropriate for Ivan Locke, a dusty empiric, who measures his world in metric tons. But while a beautiful towering construction of concrete and steel and glass is a sum of simple ideas, a detailed empirical inventory, people are not like that. And so he weathers a storm of emotion born of his mistake: from hospitalized Bethan (Olivia Colman), from his wife Katrina (Ruth Wilson), from First Mate Donal (Andrew Scott), from his immediate "superior" Gareth (Ben Daniels), and from his children Eddie (Tom Holland) and Sean (Bill Milner). The exception is Sister Margaret (Alice Lowe) a charming cameo of professional calm.

The tightly structured script for this road play is suggestive of the sort of thing we used to see at The Royal Court Theatre in the late 1960's and early 1970's, Bethan even makes reference to Samuel Becket and Waiting for Godot, and the umbilical cord as a noose. The difference is that Locke is stuck in a car not in a pot or a pile of sand, an existential parable nonetheless, in which the language ripples with symbolism like gravitational waves.

And if you can be entertained by vehicle registrations, the number plate of the BMW Locke is driving into the abyss reads ADIO XSJ which can give Spanish ADIOS (goodbye) and the Greek XAOS (chaos). It can also give us DIOS (god) of course, and even Ivan Locke has a prayer, but of one thing he is well aware, "You don't trust god when it comes to concrete."


Plymouth F159 Baby Alpaca Grande Yarn Pattern Peruvian Hat (I Want To Knit)
Plymouth F159 Baby Alpaca Grande Yarn Pattern Peruvian Hat (I Want To Knit)
Price: £0.77

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Incomplete Instructions, 27 Nov 2013
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The download of 8 pages only contained instructions for an ear-flap. I had expected instructions for the complete hat. Unsatisfactory.


Zhuangzi - The Essential Texts: With Translations from Traditional Commentaries
Zhuangzi - The Essential Texts: With Translations from Traditional Commentaries
by Zhuangzi
Edition: Paperback
Price: £11.95

1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars OUTSTANDING, 8 Aug 2013
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"Suppose you and I get into a debate. If you win and I lose, does that really mean you are right and I am wrong? If I win and you lose, does that really mean I'm right and you're wrong? Must one of us be right and the other wrong? Or could both of us be right, or both of us wrong? If neither you nor I can know, a third person would be even more benighted. Whom should we have straighten out the matter? Someone who agrees with you? But since he already agrees with you, how can he straighten it out? Someone who agrees with me? But since, she already agrees with me, how can he straighten it out? Someone who disagrees with both of us? But if he already disagrees with both of us, how can he straighten it out? Someone who agrees with both of us? But since he already agrees with both of us, how can he straighten it out? So neither you nor I nor any third party can ever know how it is--shall we wait for yet some "other"?
extract 2.44 from Inner Chapter Two Equalizing Assessments of Things page 20

footnote to the above "Wait for some `other"' is dai bi [Chinese characters given]. For dai, see ... Glossary. Bi, here translated "other," is the word used for "that" as opposed to "this" earlier in this chapter.

2.44 SHI DEQING: The living pulse of Zhuangzi's writing integrates it from top to bottom, like an underground spring. This chapter speaks laterally and vertically, up and down and back and forth, for over three thousand characters, finally arriving at this one word "other" to conclude it. What power it has! Looking back to the beginning of the discussion, with its subtle hints about a "genuine ruler," we find that he said there merely that "without an other there is no me," making this word "other" the ruling principle of the discussion. At the end here the phrase "wait for yet some other" is suddenly and boldly thrown forth. When you see to the bottom of the workings involved here, the transformations of this kind of prose are understood in all their inconceivable spiritual marvel.
Page 160 Selections from TRADITIONAL COMMENTARIES ON THE INNER CHAPTERS

DAI [Chinese character given]. Depend On, Wait, Wait For, Attend To. The word means both diachronic "waiting for" and synchronic "dependence on," as well as "to attend to" someone, as one does to a guest. .... For Zhuangzi, the meaning of words "depends" on the perspective from which they are spoken.. Right and wrong "depend" on the meaning assigned to words, the primary designation of what is "this." The value of one's identity "depends" on the environments that affirm it. Liezi and Peng "depend on" the wind, just as Kun "depends on" the water. In all these cases, Zhuangzi regards dependence as an undesirable condition to be overcome. But the same word is used in the crucial line of Chapter 4: "The vital energy is an emptiness, a waiting for the presence of beings" ... Freedom from dependence is attained not by withdrawal from interaction with things, but by emptying oneself of a fixed identity so that one can depend on--follow.' along with, go by"--the intrinsic self-posited value of anything that comes along.
GLOSSARY of [18] essential terms page 213/4

SHI DEQING (1546-1623). One of the "Four Eminent Monks" of the Ming dynasty, Shi Deqing was a Buddhist monk renowned for his works on Chan (Zen), his spiritual autobiography, and his syncretic approach to Buddhism. More broadly, he viewed the three teachings (Buddhist, Daoism, and Confucianism) as forming a unity. His commentaries to both the Inner Chapters of the Zhuangzi and to the Daodejing, are regarded by many as masterpieces, showing close attention both to the literary structure and to the religious and philosophical implications of the texts.
Page 225 ABOUT THE [47] COMMENTATORS

Thus Brook Ziporyn layers his ZHUANGZI, a beautiful translation and a model of YI MING [also glossed].


Key Concepts in Chinese Philosophy(Chinese Edition)
Key Concepts in Chinese Philosophy(Chinese Edition)
by Edmund Ryden
Edition: Paperback

5.0 out of 5 stars BUYER BEWARE, 11 Mar 2013
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This excellent book is available in hardback at a more reasonable price. The listing on Amazon as "Chinese edition" simply means the English translation printed in China.


The Holy Qur'an in Arabic with Chinese Translation / Bilingual Arabic - Chinese Qur'an / Beautiful Brown Hardcover / King Fahad Publication
The Holy Qur'an in Arabic with Chinese Translation / Bilingual Arabic - Chinese Qur'an / Beautiful Brown Hardcover / King Fahad Publication

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars FINE QUALITY, 26 Feb 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
The copy I bought (through DAR AL TAQWA) has a red & gold cover (ideal for a Chinese translation) and measures approximately 22 X 14 cm (x 3,5 cm), page size 21 x 13 cm with generous surrounding margins. Fine quality paper and printing.


Arabic-English Dictionary of Qur'anic Usage (Handbook of Oriental Studies: Section 1, the Near & Middle East)
Arabic-English Dictionary of Qur'anic Usage (Handbook of Oriental Studies: Section 1, the Near & Middle East)
by Elsaid M. Badawi
Edition: Hardcover
Price: £198.85

5.0 out of 5 stars A PARADIGM OF PERFECTION, 20 Feb 2013
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"... a new scholarly dictionary of the vocabulary of the Qur'an, with complete translation of all words, in which the abundant information in the commentary literature [is] taken into account. ... The information in this dictionary is presented by root, as in most dictionaries, but an interesting feature is that at the beginning of each lemma the entire semantic range of the root is given, together with a frequency count of each form belonging to the root. ... For each individual lexical unit, the meanings in different contexts are carefully distinguished. Thus, for an important notion like kitâb, no less than fourteen different meanings are given, from `written document' to `prescribed punishment', each of which is illustrated with a quotation from the text, with full translation. ... This means that the dictionary will serve as a very useful reference tool, not only for the specialist, but also for beginning readers, who inevitably need as much support as they can get in their first efforts to understand the text." Foreword.

"The dictionary follows the Arabic root system and is composed of 28 sections, each of which is devoted to one letter of the Arabic alphabet, ..." Introduction.

A work of impeccable scholarship; beautiful in its clarity and elegance of presentation: a splendid achievement


Key Concepts in Chinese Philosophy (Culture & Civilization of China)
Key Concepts in Chinese Philosophy (Culture & Civilization of China)
by Zhang Dainian
Edition: Hardcover

5.0 out of 5 stars OUTSTANDING, 15 Feb 2013
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" ... The concepts and categories of classical Chinese philosophy cover a very broad spectrum. Here the emphasis will be placed on those whose meaning is deeper and more difficult to grasp or whose range of meaning is deeper or greater. ... It thus excludes terms found in Buddhism, Daoist religion (barring those in common with Daoist philosophy), technical terms from fields such as astronomy, divination, and medicine, ... literary and artistic terms such as those employed in poetry, art and music." Preface. Zhang Dainian

Edmund Ryden's translation has been authorized and assisted by Dainian. To avoid any possible confusion we are given a Comparative Table of Old and New Concepts and Categories with graphs, plus the relevant graph or graphs under each concept chapter heading; the main body of the book being essentially series of sometimes lengthy quotation, like massive stepping stones, allowing the philosophers to speak directly to us; Dainian providing the slenderest guiding thread. Any serious reader in Chinese philosophy will find much of interest in this unique book. All the text quoted here, plus the above mentioned Table of Concepts, are accessible in the most generous SEE INSIDE q.v. which should dispel any doubts on the part of a would be purchaser.

But in the translator's preface, Ryden counsels; "... It would be wrong, then, to expect to find here a complete treatise on Chinese philosophy. ...
...Awareness of the broad spectrum of Chinese philosophy and its lack of `system' is not a defect but a sign that the philosophical culture of a nation cannot be consigned to the pigeon holes of a modern author. ...
...I hope that the book serves as a useful guide to the Chinese text, which is the norm to which the reader should refer." [alas not available on Amazon.]


Putting on Panto to Pay for the Pinter
Putting on Panto to Pay for the Pinter
by Stephanie Cole
Edition: Paperback
Price: £14.19

5.0 out of 5 stars BLOOMERS & OLD GAGS, 29 Dec 2012
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"... On Monday evenings, the theatre put on more challenging fare such as one act plays by Harold Pinter, and Beckett's Waiting for Godot. `We put on the panto to pay for the Pinter'", p25

Hence the title of the book, a tribute to Henry Marshall, the Salisbury Playhouse pantos and all who performed in them. Written with Chris Abbott's accustomed clarity, the fruit of his meticulous research, but with a lot more gags than usual, this labour of love will appeal to anyone with an interest in theatre. Reading the reminiscence of others will also awake the memories of anyone who has ever performed in panto, pro or amateur, in however small a role.

" ... As King Neptune, he wore a lot of fabric seaweed and a liberal coating of green face paint and glued-on sequins. In the interval - and with only a single cold water tap - he had to wash all that off and then black up as the Cannibal King. As if that wasn't enough, John Barron insisted that he then change back again to green as King Neptune for the walk-down, so that he could appear opposite the Fairy. ..." p33

(Enter Dame gorgeously dressed) How do you like my new dress? I call it my Mills Bomb dress. You take out the pin and it's every man for himself.

" .. `- reclining on a chaise longue at the beginning of the second act of a thriller, phone in hand, only to watch in horror as the opening curtain snagged on a cocktail cabinet bringing the whole lot to the floor to the accompaniment of the sound of breaking glasses and bottles. With a level of sangfroid appropriate to his character, he improvised a request over the phone for someone to come and clear up the mess - and the actress playing the maid duly obliged.' " p52

Love ... it starts when you sink in his arms and it ends with your arms in his sink.

" ... She also remembers a dentist scene in Aladdin that never went right; at one performance David Daker as the Emperor added a gag by spitting out Mint Imperials as his teeth, but they couldn't be cleared up in time and the dancers on point all fell over. " p67

There's nothing I wouldn't do for you.
There's nothing I wouldn't do for you.
If we were married we could spend the rest of our lives doing nothing for each other.

" `The pantomimes were of their age. Of their type, they were brilliant. They were tiny, they were tight and they were well directed' ". P161

Now we'll do some harmonising. You know what harmonising is don't you?
Yes. The stuff they put on the Christmas cake.

APPENDIX III Henry Marshall's Gag Book is full of those little routines, the Tree of Truth for instance, which work so wonderfully in performance. I guess anyone who has ever done a stint in panto in their local church hall will recognize a lot of this material, still being performed annually throughout the country.

What have you got in that bucket?
Horse manure.
What are you going to do with it?
Put it on my rhubarb.
Funny, I usually put custard on mine.

This is a quality publication in every way, the paper a pleasure to handle, the typeface easy on the eye. Of course " ` ... it's a matter of complete imbuggerance to me old cock.' " (p19) if you choose not to buy this book, but then you will be missing a beautifully polished gem.


Medieval and Renaissance Stained Glass: In the Victoria and Albert Museum
Medieval and Renaissance Stained Glass: In the Victoria and Albert Museum
by Paul Williamson
Edition: Hardcover
Price: £25.98

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars SUBLIME, 12 Nov 2012
A seven page introduction is followed by a hundred and thirteen full page high definition vibrantly beautiful colour plates. A perfect guide to this splendid collection, a feast for the eyes, a song for the soul. Finally twentysix pages of commentary, keyed to the individual plates, answer all the important questions. A superbly produced book, a model of excellence.


Hamlet/Macbeth (Grandes Clasicos)
Hamlet/Macbeth (Grandes Clasicos)
by William Shakespeare
Edition: Hardcover
Price: £8.16

5.0 out of 5 stars SPLENDIDO, 2 July 2012
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Introduced by a short imaginative biography of Shakespeare, the book contains the texts of
Hamlet, Macbeth, The Merchant of Venice, and Twelth Night. The font is large and good and black - so easy on the eye. Excellent value.

Each play is preceded by an illustration, nothing special but non-obtrusive.


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