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M. P. Wallace (Sheffield, U.K.)
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Blackwall Twin Pack Bokashi Bin
Blackwall Twin Pack Bokashi Bin
Offered by evengreener
Price: £24.95

1 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars tap!, 28 Jan. 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Generally happy as everything was present and correct. Fitting the taps is quite fiddly though, and despite extensive efforts (including PTFE tape) one of the taps fell off - resulting in a sticky mess over the kitchen floor. My first load has been sat fermenting for about a week and a half so can't comment on the composter's effectiveness yet.


Summer Infant Grow with Me Single Bedrail (White)
Summer Infant Grow with Me Single Bedrail (White)
Price: £25.90

0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Didn't look much at first, but pleased by end, 28 Jan. 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
The assembly seemed a little daunting but turned out to be fairly easy. The rail is surprisingly sturdy once assembled and works very well for our two year old.


TP-Link TL-PA211KIT AV200 Nano 200Mbps Powerline Adapter - Twin Pack
TP-Link TL-PA211KIT AV200 Nano 200Mbps Powerline Adapter - Twin Pack

5.0 out of 5 stars Flawless so far, 28 Jan. 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Many good reviews of this product. I agree with most of them. I found the system very easy to setup, including creating a secure network, and it works fine in my house.


Dark Space
Dark Space
Price: £0.00

3.0 out of 5 stars Good to mediocre through wooden characters and as-ifs, 29 July 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Dark Space (Kindle Edition)
I very nearly enjoyed this book very much. Instead I quite liked. I'm looking forward to reading the next installment - but in no great rush. My enjoyment of this book was much reduced due to two factors. Firstly, and most importantly, I found the characters to not be very believable. In particular, the reaction of the main protagonist to some of the situations he finds himself and some of the events he's unwittingly involved in often feels fake and unrealistic. The problem is that whenever this happens it throws you out of the 'world' of the book; disrupting it's flow. On a secondary note, all of the characters are wooden and entirely predictable, with pretty much zero character development through the book. Secondly, several of the scenarios presented feel utterly ludicrous and, worse, the various loopholes employed by the author are cheap. I obviously don't want to give out any spoilers to those considering whether to read the book, but two events of note are the miraculous fact that only Ethan remembers the easy way to reboard the Valiant and the case where one ship manned by 50 is utterly impotent whereas a lesser ship manned by 2 is decidedly deadly. Both of these cases occur towards the end of the book, when the drama is rising. While I accept the need to maintain momentum, whenever one of the more fanciful scenarios is described I once again find myself thrown out of the book, sat there rolling my eyes and muttering 'oh come on'. Overall, I enjoyed the premise and the universe created by the author, but the coarseness and clumsiness force me to conclude this is a much shallow read than it could have been.


The Secret Life of France
The Secret Life of France
Price: £5.03

1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Fine, but feels a bit simplistic, 30 Dec. 2011
The first thing that surprised me about this book is its personal focus. This book is very much one English person's experience of France (albeit over an extended period). The book is also very much focused on northern France and Paris.

On the whole the book is a fairly pleasant read, written in an easy-going tone. The only recurring issue for me was that the book felt like it was only scratching the surface, with the French being discussed in broad generalisations (I know very little about French culture, maybe it is as homogenous as described). It's not necessarily a bad thing, as the book conveys the prevailing nature of French culture. However, the book feels more like a basic description of typical French behaviour rather than a deep insight into the French way of life.


Panasonic SD90 Full HD Camcorder - Black (SD Card Recording, x40 Intelligent Zoom, x21 Optical Zoom, Wide Angle Lens)
Panasonic SD90 Full HD Camcorder - Black (SD Card Recording, x40 Intelligent Zoom, x21 Optical Zoom, Wide Angle Lens)

92 of 93 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Good quality camera perfectly suited to semi-amateurs, 26 April 2011
Had the SD-90 for about a week and overall I'm impressed with it.

First off, the video quality is very good. Played videos back on a 37" HD TV via HDMI link direct to camcorder and the videos are crisp and clear (set at the default recording quality, which I think is the second highest its capable of). Maybe some slight blurring when panning very fast and colours could be at times more vivid, but there are a multitude of scene and manual setting I have fully explored yet. Generally, pictures look great. Camera works well in relatively low-light (tried inside under electric lights) and the auto focus is very quick.

Sound quality is OK via the twin microphones at the front of the camera. Seems to cope with ambient and near sounds well (not tried on a windy day so can't comment on noise pickup). Tested the range of the camera at picking speech, wasn't great, I'd estimate it was OK once within around 10 metres. Obviously sound issues could be addessed using the convinent mic port on the side of the camera and a directional mic on the shoe on the top of the camera.

Controls are simple and well placed. The touch screen works well, although using the menu to the side of teh screen (when video is displayed) can be a tiny bit fiddly. As with all touch screens the chunkier your fingers the tricker it will be. The camera is pretty feature packed. Detect faces in almost all cases, and you can have it recognise up to six faces (which you can set as a prioirty for focus, e.g. set the bride and groom as the priority focus at a wedding). The recognitions weren't 100% but was acceptable.

Build quality is very good. The camera settles neatly into your hand. The zoom is outstanding, the clarity of detail of extreme distance objects blew me away. However, with such a small camera (with no shoulder support) a tripod (dirt cheap on ebay) is a must.

Battery life is not the SD-90's strong point. With the standard battery you get about an hour playing with it and using all the different features. The camera can be charged off the mains while still in use, but this isn't always ideal. Spare batteries and fairly pricey and not yet widely available. I intend to try using something like the Peeble (Veho VCC-A008-PBP-XT Pebble Portable 5000mAH Battery Pack Charger for iPad/iPhone/iPod/Smartphones/PSP/NDS/NDSi/GPS) but haven't got round to checking it has the correct adapter.

Memory is less than issue. The videos take up a heck of a lot space, but SD cards can be swapped in and out quickly and easily. 16 GB gets you about 2 and a half hours at high quality, which will set ou back £20-£30 per card. The Panasonic software is better than expected but still not amazing. Films in AVCHD format, which is decteded by Microsoft media player/movie maker by default. I'm sure there are convertors to mroe firendly formats (and it may be possible in the Panasonic software). If I find a solution I'll try to add it to this review.

Overall I give the SD-90 five stars. Basically it does the job I want very well, with several features I jhadn't expected. Of course its not a pro camcorder, and the battery life is an issue (as it probably is for many camcorders - if you want extended battery life you'd best check spares/mobile charger options before buying any camcorder). However, if your intended usage is along the lines of filming the kids at Christmas, a family wedding or a day at the seaside, then you will find the SD-90 extremely capable.
Comment Comments (4) | Permalink | Most recent comment: May 18, 2011 9:11 PM BST


Infected: Infected Book 1
Infected: Infected Book 1
by Scott Sigler
Edition: Paperback

4 of 8 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars A pretty weak affair, 17 Aug. 2010
There really is nothing special about this book. Content-wise the book could have been cut-and-paste from any of hundreds of sci-fi/horror books. There just a single fresh idea or stroke of originality in the whole book. The book is wrote with a very casual tone (almost as if the author is meant to be a mate down the pub), but in truth it just comes across amateurish. The plot 'twists' can be seen coming a mile off, and too often the author has to resort to holding you hand through the developments because the narrative is too weak to do it alone.

That all said, the book was compelling enough to read through to the end. I wanted to know what happened even if it was so blatantly obvious. But, safe to say I won't be hunting for Sigler books any time soon.
Comment Comments (2) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Feb 18, 2012 11:35 PM GMT


How to Survive a Robot Uprising: Tips on Defending Yourself Against the Coming Rebellion
How to Survive a Robot Uprising: Tips on Defending Yourself Against the Coming Rebellion
by Daniel H. Wilson
Edition: Paperback

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Disappointingly basic, 30 April 2010
Now its not really fair to directly compare 'How to survive a robot uprising' and Max Brook's excellent 'World War Z' World War Z, but some comparison is inevitable. Whilst WWZ is a imaginative, detailed, and throughly entertaining, 'robot uprising' is very primitive. Basically the small book consists of about 200 words on each type/aspect of robotics and its current state of research (as it's a book it's immediately out of date), and then that's kind of spun round to say the limits in current research are weaknesses to exploit in an uprising. There's no real kind of discussion of what an uprising would be like.

I thought the book was rather dull. That all said the artistry in the book is excellent if not abstract.


Fry's English Delight (BBC Audio)
Fry's English Delight (BBC Audio)
by Stephen Fry
Edition: Audio CD

3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great easy and interesting listening, 2 Jan. 2010
As you may expect from Fry and Radio 4 this is a very slick production. The whole thing holds your interest, is full of fascinating details and is exquisitely presented and produced. Obviously, if you don't like Fry or have no interest in Metaphors than this isn't for you. Also it's not an academic approach to the subject, it does draw on a lot of Academia but its very much in a light entertainment style. I just listen to odd bits on the drive to work and am very pleased with it.


Ravensburger Penguin Pile Up Game
Ravensburger Penguin Pile Up Game
Offered by BestBuyerDirect
Price: £12.90

17 of 19 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Brief fun, but nothing special, 2 Jan. 2010
= Durability:3.0 out of 5 stars  = Fun:4.0 out of 5 stars  = Educational:2.0 out of 5 stars 
We bought this for Christmas (2009) having read the rave-reviews on Amazon. I have to say that although we did have some fun playing the game it didn't hold attention for very long. The 'ice-berg' sits on a spike which allows it to wobble on that point, and you then take it in turns to place penguins until the inevitable happens and they all come crashing down. As the penguins are so large and the ice-berg platforms similarly sized, its not possible to quite as delicately balance just-one-more-piece as you can in other balancing games (like the 'straw that broke the camel's back' games, where the small straws allow for minute balancing). That said, Penguin Pile-Up is pretty much what you'd expect from such a game... some carefully balancing, a big crash, and then starting again.


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