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An Idiot Abroad - Series 3 [DVD]
An Idiot Abroad - Series 3 [DVD]
Dvd ~ Karl Pilkington
Price: £5.60

3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Dire, 2 Feb 2013
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Not a patch a previous idiot abroad's. Karl's humorous and entertaining view on the world is dampened by Warwick who insists on taking Karl's comedy literally. Karl is a comic genius. Warwick's only talent is that he's a dwarf, which is not strictly a talent. Plus, there are only 3 episodes, yet the DVD is still full price. Don't bother.


Understand Calculus: Teach Yourself
Understand Calculus: Teach Yourself
by Paul Abbott
Edition: Paperback

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Truly Excellent, 5 May 2012
What a truly excellent book. How many maths books have you ever bought that kept you reading? I'm betting not many. The system of explanation, followed by worked examples and then test problems is a powerful learning system. I can't recommend it enough.


Response Surface Methodology: Process and Product Optimization Using Designed Experiments (Wiley Series in Probability and Statistics)
Response Surface Methodology: Process and Product Optimization Using Designed Experiments (Wiley Series in Probability and Statistics)
by Raymond H. Myers
Edition: Hardcover
Price: £106.00

5.0 out of 5 stars Beautiful book ... on DOE, 30 Mar 2012
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It's not often I'm struck by the aesthetics of a book, but I have to say that this is one beautiful book. The content is easy to follow and you will learn everything there is to know (or at least everything you want to know) about Design of Experiments (DOE). The title is slightly misleading, because this is not the last word on response surfaces by any means - it only covers first, second (and I think maybe third) degree polynomial response surfaces - ie traditional DOE territory. If you want to know all about DOE and the various sampling methodologies, then its all here. If you want to know about building response surfaces to replicate deterministic computer models, look elsewhere.


Multi-Objective Optimization Using Evolutionary Algorithms (Wiley Paperback)
Multi-Objective Optimization Using Evolutionary Algorithms (Wiley Paperback)
by Kalyanmoy Deb
Edition: Paperback
Price: £55.50

4.0 out of 5 stars Great book, marred by appalling print quality, 30 Mar 2012
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Really happy with this book - at least from a content point of view. It does just what it says on the tin and the author's style makes easy going of some tough concepts. The breadth of coverage is also fantastic. However, the print quality of this book is dire, and I mean dire. It looks like a low-res screen capture, with characters and illustrations having noticeably jagged edges, whilst on some pages text and images are faded - reminiscent of the effect of ink running low on a normal printer. The quality is totally unacceptable for a book of any price, let alone this price. I complained to Amazon, and was refunded a small percentage of the cost, but to be honest I wanted a new book. It was so bad, I thought there was a good chance I'd got a duff one.


Real World Haskell
Real World Haskell
by Bryan O'Sullivan
Edition: Paperback
Price: £22.79

12 of 12 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Frustrating, 16 Jun 2011
This review is from: Real World Haskell (Paperback)
I have mixed feelings about this book. My girlfriend thought it was my favourite book because I was always reading it and it became very well-worn. However, the real reason I couldn't put it down was because I couldn't understand it. The main problems with the book are:

1. The code examples are too interdependent. If you get a mental block (or get bored), you can't jump to another chapter to `take a bite from a different side of the cake' because most code just builds on the code developed in previous chapters. So if you skipped the previous chapter you're stuffed. Even if you didn't skip the previous chapter, you will be doing well if you can piece together the `actual' code from all the fragments littered throughout the chapter - some of which are red herrings (ie code fragments that are there to show you how not to do it).
2. There is a step change in pace around chapter 10, which goes from the pace of a Sunday drive to light-speed, almost as if there was a change of author. The chapter is way too dense and tries to get too many concepts across at once. This is also the chapter that has the greatest number of mistakes, so for me it was like hitting a wall, my progress practically slowed to a halt and I was seriously debating whether to continue with the language.

That said there is some good stuff in here, it just needs a re-think. If you are new to Haskell, I recommend you check out `Learn You A Haskell for Great Good' first and come back here if you are a masochist.
Comment Comment (1) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Sep 15, 2012 9:26 PM BST


Learn You a Haskell for Great Good!: A Beginner's Guide
Learn You a Haskell for Great Good!: A Beginner's Guide
by Miran Lipovaca
Edition: Paperback
Price: £25.19

16 of 16 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars If you buy one book on Haskell, make it this., 16 Jun 2011
The best book on Haskell there is - believe me, I've got them all. There are a lot of intellectually challenging concepts in Haskell that I have never seen explained well - anywhere. This book changes all that. The author has any uncanny knack of answering your questions as you think of them - even the dumb ones. This book should be the de facto text for schools teaching functional programming. I believe that this text is a game changer and the vehicle that will finally bring Haskell to the masses - I just hope it's not too late. If you're thinking about learning Haskell, forget the rest >>= get the best.


Introduction To Genetic Algorithms For Scientists And Engineers, An
Introduction To Genetic Algorithms For Scientists And Engineers, An
by David A Coley
Edition: Paperback
Price: £27.91

5.0 out of 5 stars How a book should be, 7 Nov 2010
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Straightforward, no messing, to-the-point book on Genetic Algorithms that enabled me to write one over the weekend. A near perfect example of how a book like this should be.


Artificial Intelligence: A Beginner's Guide (Oneworld Beginners' Guides)
Artificial Intelligence: A Beginner's Guide (Oneworld Beginners' Guides)
by Blay Whitby
Edition: Paperback

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Total Lack of Substance, 7 Nov 2010
The writer's style is engaging enough and the subject interesting enough but this book fails to deliver big time. Despite the get-out-clause of "a beginners guide" appended to the title, the book has little substance and instead prefers to dance around the subject without ever explaining any of the details - even at what I would consider 'a beginner level'. If someone wrote a book called "HASKELL - a beginners guide", I would expect to emerge with sufficient knowledge about HASKELL to be able to write a simple program. If however, the book spent all of its time talking about all the great things I could do "if" I learnt HASKELL, I would emerge none the wiser about HASKELL feeling thoroughly cheated.

I went all the way through this book and I still don't know what data-mining is or how it works. Also, all of the examples such as NASAs shuttle scheduling software are simply 'mentioned', never 'explained'. The author is also keen to point out (on numerous occasions) that anyone can participate in AI. If you were one of those people, you might think that buying a book called "AI - a beginners guide" might be a good starting point - in this case you'd be completely wrong - this book can't help you. Thoroughly dissapointing.


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