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Amazon Customer "David Boyle" (London United Kingdom)

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Secrets of the Last Nazi: A mindblowing conspiracy thriller (Myles Munro action thriller series Book 1)
Secrets of the Last Nazi: A mindblowing conspiracy thriller (Myles Munro action thriller series Book 1)
Price: £1.99

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Thoroughly recommended, 14 Aug. 2015
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Thrillers ought to be written by people like Iain King more often. He clearly has an interest in philosophy and politics, and he brings these to bear on the narrative with dramatic effect. This is not your average Nazi thriller. It has an edge to it that so many others lack. I thoroughly recommend it.


No Place For A Lady
No Place For A Lady
by Gill Paul
Edition: Paperback
Price: £3.85

5.0 out of 5 stars Imagine Charlotte Bronte lived to go to the Crimea, 6 July 2015
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This review is from: No Place For A Lady (Paperback)
Imagine Charlotte Bronte had lived to see the Crimean War in all its muddle and horror and then came home to write about it. I have a feeling she might have written something along these lines. Mid-Victorian England seems both familiar from all those set texts we read and yet also completely re-imagined - I don't think I;ve read anything like it before. Gill Paul has pulled it off brilliantly.


World War I Love Stories: Real-life Romances from the War that Shook the World
World War I Love Stories: Real-life Romances from the War that Shook the World
by Gill Paul
Edition: Hardcover
Price: £14.99

5.0 out of 5 stars seen through the perspective of a series of love affairs - some successful, 20 July 2014
This one of those sideways looks at the global conflagration that you never forget, seen through the perspective of a series of love affairs - some successful, some tragic, some just not very successful. It provides a very simple extra dimension to the whole First World War extravaganza that is coming up. I couldn't stop reading it!


Dexem Repair Cream 60g
Dexem Repair Cream 60g

2 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars I think it works, 21 Jun. 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
It is a bit too early to be certain about this, but I am beginning to think this cream really makes a difference - which, considering how many creams claim to make a difference and really don't, is pretty good. I've only given it four stars because it is so expensive.


Cancel The Apocalypse: The New Path To Prosperity
Cancel The Apocalypse: The New Path To Prosperity
by Andrew Simms
Edition: Paperback

11 of 12 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Antidote to dinosaurs, 10 Mar. 2013
We all of us live with some kind of apocalypse hanging over us. These days it is global warming. In my youth, we used to sit over school lunch, discussing what we should do if the four-minute warning sounded that heralded nuclear annihilation. Before that, it was the threat of apocalypse by aerial bombardment. The idea that we might dwell a little less on the imminent end of the world is not to suggest that these are not real threats - or that we need do nothing about them. We avoided nuclear apocalypse by the skin of our teeth during the Cold War, and not because everyone sat back and trusted those in charge.

But the green movement clings to the idea of apocalypse, and does so increasingly, and it is deeply disempowering - it may also explain the strange lack of communication between those of us who count themselves as part of the green movement (like me) and those who don't. So when one of our foremost green campaigners comes along with a book called Cancel the Apocalypse, and when it has a big thumbs up sign on the front cover and sparkles with the kind of optimism you usually get from washing powder - then you know something important is happening.

Andrew Simms is a close friend (I must declare an interest here). His thesis is that humanity tends to avoid our looming apocalypses through innovation and imagination, and his book is therefore a prediction of the age to come. This is a vital shift in the argument for green campaigners. Prophesying the end of the world is difficult to sustain, because those it manages to convince it also disempowers. But to argue that the world inevitably adapts to avoid disaster is something else entirely.

It puts the spotlight on the dinosaurs around us - who sometimes seem to be absolutely everywhere - who say that the status quo will continue, except more so. It is difficult enough to believe that the economy will be organised in exactly the same way that caused the difficulties in the first place, but more so. Or that the energy shortfall will be solved by the policies of the 1970s. But what is really impossible to swallow is the idea that nothing will change. That is the argument of failed elites in all ages, and they are always wrong. In short, this is an important book.


Women and Children First
Women and Children First
Price: £1.99

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars You'll really dive in, 22 April 2012
What Gill Paul manages to do with this book is to create an absolutely compelling story that carries on, beyond the wreck, the Carpathia and the arrival in New York - and that is something I hadn't read anywhere before. It is readable and utterly enthralling. I really recommend it.


Your Money or Your Life: Time for Both
Your Money or Your Life: Time for Both
by Martin Simon
Edition: Hardcover

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Important and fun, 24 Dec. 2011
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This is an important book. It is the first proper book about time banks published in the UK, which is important in itself, because there are now over 200 of them and the movement has not been properly recorded - and this book is by the UK founder of the idea. But it goes way beyond the mechanics of time banking to look at the urgent reasons why we need a more co-operative society. But it is also fun to read, and to dip into, beautifully designed with quotations, facts and stories. Anyone who wants to get to the heart of what the Big Society could have been, but wasn't - so far anyway - should read this book


Ecological Debt: Global Warming and the Wealth of Nations
Ecological Debt: Global Warming and the Wealth of Nations
by Andrew Simms
Edition: Paperback
Price: £14.99

2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Authoritative and a very good read, 16 Jun. 2009
The whole idea of ecological debt is really exciting, ground-breaking stuff, and Andrew Simms - who came up with it in the first place - as written a brilliantly readable and challenging book. Nor is this the usual depressing stuff about global warming: it offers a way out. If you want a good guide to the debate about the planet, and one that is actually fun to read, you couldn't go wrong with this one!


The She-Apostle: The Extraordinary Life and Death of Luisa de Carvajal
The She-Apostle: The Extraordinary Life and Death of Luisa de Carvajal
by Glyn Redworth
Edition: Hardcover
Price: £16.99

14 of 14 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Brilliant evocation, 26 Sept. 2008
This is an amazing evocation of the sights, smells, fears and politics of London in the early 17th century, seen through the eyes of one of its most peculiar inhabitants, as well as the story of her life before coming to London - a Roman Catholic ascetic at the heart of the Catholic paranoia that followed the Gunpowder Plot. It is very readable and throws unexpected light onto the present day.


A Brief History of Globalization: The Untold Story of our Incredible Shrinking Planet (Brief Histories)
A Brief History of Globalization: The Untold Story of our Incredible Shrinking Planet (Brief Histories)
by Alex MacGillivray
Edition: Paperback
Price: £12.99

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Exploding myths, 3 Mar. 2006
Alex Macgillivray has written something absoluteoly unique. It sets the globalisation debate in a vast historical context, and manages to explode so many myths that he will keep the pundits of both sides re-thinking their basic premises. And he manages to do it with verve and wit. There is no better introduction to globalisation currently in print


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