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Paul Metcalf: Collected Works: 1976-1986 Volume two
Paul Metcalf: Collected Works: 1976-1986 Volume two
by Paul Metcalf
Edition: Hardcover

5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars, 5 Nov. 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Delighted with this purchase.


A Balance of Quinces
A Balance of Quinces
by Erik Anderson-reece
Edition: Paperback

5.0 out of 5 stars Reliable, quality bookseller, 5 Nov. 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: A Balance of Quinces (Paperback)
Delighted to get this book. I would always trust this bookseller in Kilkenny.


Collins English Dictionary & Thesaurus
Collins English Dictionary & Thesaurus
Price: £10.10

13 of 14 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Lousy Kindle edition, 29 Sept. 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
I purchased this for my iPad as I needed a decent dictionary and thesaurus for travelling. It turns out that it is like a book in that you have to turn the various pages to try and find a word. It can take ages and ages to try and locate a particular word, in fact it takes much longer than an actual book. There is no easy search facility. Very disappointed.


Sinister Resonance: The Mediumship of the Listener
Sinister Resonance: The Mediumship of the Listener
by David Toop
Edition: Hardcover

3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Repetitive, 17 Jun. 2011
I've really enjoyed Toop's previous books, but this one seems a bit of a mess. There's some very nice, perceptive stuff in here, which is to be expected, but the book as a whole doesn't appear to have a structured focus. It appears randomly organized with an inconsistent quality to his style. I constantly had a feeling of deja vu as he repeats himself so much. He also lobs in gratuitous details from his private life that make no contribution to his argument. Some of the blame must go to his editor who could have done a great deal of tightening up. In fact, if you tore the book in half (I mean that metaphorically!) you could read either half on its own without any loss of what he's getting at (and I'm still not sure what that is).


The Magic Mountain (Everyman's Library Contemporary Classics)
The Magic Mountain (Everyman's Library Contemporary Classics)
by Thomas Mann
Edition: Hardcover
Price: £12.09

21 of 22 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A peak of literature., 29 Dec. 2009
Take your time reading this 'Matterhorn' of European literature. You'll need a break from time to time to regain your breath but don't worry, the mountain will still be there for you to just pick up where you left off. John E. Woods is definitely the translator to read with all of Mann's novels. Forget the old translations of Lowe-Porter, now widely ridiculed by scholars as misleading of Mann's true voice.


The Library at Night
The Library at Night
by Alberto Manguel
Edition: Paperback
Price: £10.99

10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A bibliophile's delight., 29 Dec. 2009
This review is from: The Library at Night (Paperback)
If you really love books and are buried in books (like I am here at home) this book will make you envious at the author's superbly housed library. He takes you on a labyrinthine tour of some wonderful and obscure tomes that he has collected and cherished over the years. His enthusiasm for reading is infectious and it's good to hear someone give voice to the pure sensuousness that can be got from a decent book. Yes, we probably are a dying breed. You can stuff your Kindles. Whoops, sorry Amazon!


Brian Eno's Another Green World (33 1/3)
Brian Eno's Another Green World (33 1/3)
by Geeta Dayal
Edition: Paperback
Price: £6.99

7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars A boring green world., 28 Dec. 2009
The author admits she has spent several years working on this book. It reads more like it was thrown together over a few months; a scissors and paste job done from lots of old interviews. It also includes some puzzling statements: for example she says that 'Evening Star' has an abstract cover when it has a clearly figurative painting of an island in the sea (by Peter Schmidt). It's a shame that Eno himself hasn't contributed anything. Such an enchanting record requires (and deserves) some enchanting writing and thinking, but it's a surprisingly pedestrian take on the production of the whole enterprise and fails to convey its cultural uniqueness at the time. In fact AGW felt like it came from another planet, quite different from this one. I recall buying it the day it came out and racing home to place it on the turntable. You really didn't know what to expect from an Eno album in the '70s. God knows how many times I've listened to it, but it still comes up fresh as a daisy. 35 years on this really is an aesthetic phenomenon. Sadly, a missed opportunity by the publishers.


Think Before You Think: Social Complexity and Knowledge of Knowing
Think Before You Think: Social Complexity and Knowledge of Knowing
by Brian Eno
Edition: Paperback

9 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Stimulating systemic insights., 15 Dec. 2009
This is an outstanding selection of talks and papers by a sadly neglected thinker. If you're interested in all areas of recent research in theories of complexity, you will be amazed to discover that Stafford Beer was decades ahead of the game. Much of what we consider new and exciting intellectual ideas such as catastrophe theory, chaos theory, fractals, emergence, critical mass and self-organization (including the work from the Santa Fe Institute) was already in the air back in the 1960s and 1970s in the guise of cybernetics and general systems theory. Beer was one of the foremost exponents of these now undervalued disciplines and found a serious and pragmatic application for them as a social scientist. He also took Maturana's notion of autopoiesis (self-making) and really ran with it. There are fascinating chapters regarding our mental models and paradigms in how we construct our worlds (Beer once said that he practised 'applied epistemology'). One is reminded of that other great classic 'Steps to an Ecology of Mind' by Gregory Bateson. The breadth of both books has a transdisciplinary quality rare in most of today's publications. The engaging quality of writing is also a joy. Really relevant stuff.


The Sacred Whore: Sheela Goddess of the Celts
The Sacred Whore: Sheela Goddess of the Celts
by Maureen Concannon
Edition: Paperback

4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Wishy-washy waffle, 22 July 2008
This book deserves an award for utter vapidity. It's not totally useless as there's a laugh on every page. Of course it's not meant to be funny, but the author's prose style and 'thought process' is so embarrassing it's up for extreme parody. God knows how it ever got into print. The whole book is a mess, even the bibliography is full of misprints, surely no editor can have given it a cursory glance. The book actually brings Collins Press into disrepute. The master work on this subject is 'Sheela-na-Gig' by Barbara Freitag, now there's scholarship that's a pleasure to read.


Journey Through the British Isles
Journey Through the British Isles
by Harry Cory Wright
Edition: Hardcover
Price: £40.00

2 of 11 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Bland in the extreme, 28 Jan. 2008
This is photography at its most insipid and lazy. Wright succeeds in eradicating the wealth of rich details that make up these islands. His lens has ironed out variety making everywhere (from Land's End to John O'Groats) look monotonously identical. A definite candidate for the dullest landscape photography book ever produced.
Comment Comment (1) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Jul 10, 2012 11:59 AM BST


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