Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop All Amazon Fashion Cloud Drive Photos Shop now Learn More Shop now DIYED Shop now Shop Fire Shop Kindle Oasis Shop now Learn more Shop now
Profile for Bob Salter > Reviews

Personal Profile

Content by Bob Salter
Top Reviewer Ranking: 151
Helpful Votes: 8248

Learn more about Your Profile.

Reviews Written by
Bob Salter "Captain Spindrift" (Wiltshire, England)
(VINE VOICE)    (TOP 500 REVIEWER)   

Show:  
Page: 1-10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21-30
pixel
Fighting Man Of The Plains [DVD]
Fighting Man Of The Plains [DVD]
Dvd ~ Randolph Scott
Price: £8.99

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars From Raider to Sheriff!, 1 Feb. 2015
One of Phil Hardy’s more errant reviews in his epic tome “Encyclopedia of Western Movies”, where he dismissed this film as a ‘solid but unimaginative actioneer’! It is a better film than that! He also wrongly identifies Victor Jory as the films villain, which is untrue. An easy mistake to make as Jory so often played the villain. But in this one he is a staunch ally of the films hero Randolph Scott who plays Jim Dancer, an ex Quantrill’s raider, who through circumstances beyond his control ends up as a sheriff. His past of course comes back to haunt him!

Scott, as ever the model of consistency, delivers yet another strong performance to give the film a solid foundation. His hero is able to shoot a man down in cold blood, which is an unusually bold step for a Scott character to take. The action comes thick and fast around a decently constructed plot. Admittedly it is not a strong cast, but Scott and Jory are able to carry the film. There are many good scenes especially where Scott lays down his credentials to become a lawman. A scene that seems to have been copied in Kevin Costner’s Wyatt Earp film! Earp himself was a lawman with a shady past! A film that is good enough to influence a production as big as that must have some merits! The second tier director Edwin L Marin has acquitted himself well with this one! Worthy of adding to the western collection!


The Boat of Fate
The Boat of Fate
by Keith Roberts
Edition: Paperback
Price: £9.99

5.0 out of 5 stars A Hero With Feet of Clay!, 31 Jan. 2015
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: The Boat of Fate (Paperback)
I can only add to the glowing reviews. What a fascinating glimpse into the final death throes of the Roman empire. It was a book I was unusually gripped by and really struggled to put down. The central character Segius Paullus is a memorable one, who makes up for the authors more improbable moments. There are a few timely interventions and meetings that stretch credulity a bit, but these can be easily forgiven. Paullus is not your usual heroic figure, he comes with giant feet of clay. Everything he touches turns to s**t, excuse my French, which adds a rich dark hue to proceedings. The story itself never lets up and holds you until its satisfying ending.

I read this after completing Bernard Cornwell's Warlord series, and I have to admit that much as I enjoyed those, this is a superior work. Like those books, this one uses Wiltshire locations, so it is no surprise to learn that the author Keith Roberts lived in Salisbury. Primarily a science fiction writer it is a great pity that he didn't write more historical novels, given the quality of this one. I cannot vouch for the historical accuracy but it is certainly a rollicking good read. Given the amount of historical pulp circulating at present it is a pity that this one does not enjoy a wider readership!


Kiss The Water [DVD]
Kiss The Water [DVD]
Dvd ~ Eric Steel
Price: £15.00

5.0 out of 5 stars Still Haunted by Waters, 31 Jan. 2015
This review is from: Kiss The Water [DVD] (DVD)
The life story of a fly tying expert does not sound like promising material for a documentary, but in the right hands it can take flight and become a thing of real beauty. Megan Boyd lived in the same isolated cottage a few miles outside of remote Brora on the wild East coast of Sutherland. Given a book on fly tying she started a hobby that ended up with royal appointment. Prince Charles himself sat in Megan's austere classless little cottage to collect the salmon flies she specialised in. Through interviews with the very Scottish locals who knew her and the `toffs' as Megan might have referred to her wealthier customers, we get an unusual glimpse into a fascinating life lived in a majestic landscape.

The documentary mixes breathtaking photography of the area with expertly crafted expressionist animation. Nothing is hurried and the camera lingers happily on things of beauty. Thus we see the myriad sparkling stars reflecting on the clear fast flowing rivers on those rare days when the sun shines in Scotland. Perhaps I have been unlucky? We get close ups of Megan's wonderful creations, which I would certainly be happy to devour if presented over my head. Salmon may only have a brain the size of a pea but they clearly recognise something a bit special. In the same way that Norman Maclean was able to distil the true essence of fishing in prose, this documentary does the same on film. It weaves a sort of magic on you that is hard to resist. You do not even have to be a fisherman to enjoy this sort of magic!

A long time ago, in more care free days, I caught trout and grayling using less noble methods than the dry fly in a crystal clear chalk stream, often under the noses of tweed coated piscatorial fishing members. Highly effective methods I might add! Hopefully the statute of limitations is up for these grave offences! Sadly I have never had the opportunity to fish for salmon and doubt that I ever will! Perhaps one day in my twilight years I will return to the clear waters of my youth. This time legally without having to look over my shoulder for bailiffs! This is a film which captures all that I loved about the most spellbinding of sports. I still have the heart of a fisherman and I am still haunted by waters!


Man in the Saddle [DVD] [1951] [Region 1] [US Import] [NTSC]
Man in the Saddle [DVD] [1951] [Region 1] [US Import] [NTSC]

4.0 out of 5 stars Pushed as Far as He's Gonna go!, 24 Jan. 2015
This tasty little western was the first of those fruitful collaborations between actor Randolph Scott and producer Harry Joe Brown, a rich seam of films that culminated in hitting the mother lode with those esteemed Budd Boetticher classics “Ride Lonesome” and “The Tall T”. Admittedly this film does not hit those lofty heights, but it is pretty durn good! There is an awful lot of talent on display here. The director Andre de Toth was certainly no slouch in the chair, he went on to make a hatful of decent westerns with “Day of the Outlaw” being exceptional. Kenneth Gamet’s involving script is based on the great western writer Ernest Haycox’s novel of the same name. Gamet also provided the strong script for Scott’s excellent “A Lawless Street”.

The story itself is based on “a tale as old as time”, the eternal western struggle between the small rancher and the big bad range oligarch. This time Scott is the beleaguered small guy who is ‘pushed as far as he’s gonna go’, and as any oater fan will know, pushing Randy around is just asking for trouble. Alexander Knox is curiously, but effectively cast as the villain of the piece, ably abetted by Richard Rober, who sadly died in a road accident not long after the film was made. John Russell also makes another appearance for team baddies! Team good has the considerable physical presence of Gunn ‘big boy’ Williams and Cameron Mitchell. Alfonso Bedoya, so brilliant in the roles of rogueish bandidos, is this time converted to the good side. Joan Leslie and Ellen Drew are the two attractive ladies who form part the uncommonly complex love shennanigans. With the interesting story, one almighty good punch up, plenty of action, and some great outdoor work at the iconic Lone Pine, this western could never be described as dull or routine. Look out for Bedoya stealing the closing scene? Another lovely original touch, of which this film has many! The true western fan will love this one!


Out Of Town - With Jack Hargreaves: Volume 9 [DVD]
Out Of Town - With Jack Hargreaves: Volume 9 [DVD]
Dvd ~ Out of Town

5.0 out of 5 stars Still Fishing at a Hundred!, 16 Jan. 2015
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
I loved watching Jack Hargreaves on TV many years ago, when he presented from that atmospheric shed in his garden in the New Forest. It evoked another era, and you could almost smell the country in the air as you watched. Jack's films have become even more valuable with the passage of time and they are a priceless glimpse into a rural past that has been lost. His memory went back a long way and he had a genuine love of all country matters which comes through strongly in all these episodes. They are all equally watchable if you are interested in old country ways. Jack Hargreaves commentary is wonderfully natural and idiosyncratic, which matches the films perfectly. He has captured a countryside that has now all but vanished. His enthusiasm and wealth of country knowledge is obvious. Most importantly for us is that he wanted to pass that on. These films are his wonderful legacy to us.

This one contains the following: Episode 25 Cod Fishing/Centenarian Angler. Jack goes fishing for codling in winter off of the South Coast. He also accompanies an old man on a fishing trip to celebrate his 100th birthday. Episode 26 Charcoal Burners/Pigeon Shooting. Jack watches a charcoal burner going about his trade and also goes out on a days pigeon shooting. Episode 27 Long Distance Ride. Jack watches a long distance horse ride where the first across the line does not necessarily win.

The episodes are all hugely enjoyable with 'Centenarian Angler' being perhaps the pick of them for me. Even better now than when they were first shown, I am pleased have just completed buying the whole series. Many were bought cheaply as used, but were in perfect condition. They seem to be rising in price recently due to scarcity and the last two were a little more expensive. Now might be a good time to buy them before they get really pricey. After this series there are the lost episodes to look forward to. Best watched with a pint of strong bottle conditioned beer in front of a wood burner on those long winter nights. A purely personal choice of course, but one I am sure Jack would have approved of.


The Mark of Zorro [DVD] [1940]
The Mark of Zorro [DVD] [1940]
Dvd ~ Tyrone Power
Offered by Discs4all
Price: £4.85

5.0 out of 5 stars No Wonder he Joined the Church!, 15 Jan. 2015
This film falls firmly into the traditions of the great movies of Hollywoods golden age. Films such as “Beau Geste”, “Gunga Din”, “Lives of a Bengal Lancer” and “The Adventures of Robin Hood” were huge costume productions, alive with optimism and heroes that would have graced the pages of Homer. The Second World War unsurprisingly heralded an age of greater cynicism. The inclusion of Basil Rathbone and Eugene Pallette in the cast reminded me of “The Adventures of Robin Hood” where Rathbone played Guy of Gisborne and the husky voiced Pallette played Friar Tuck. “The Mark of Zorro” is very similar in tone. This time the impossibly handsome Tyrone Power is the hero who robs the corrupt rich to give to the poor.

Power plays the foppish Don Diego Vega who returns from Spain to early 19th Century California. Appalled by the treatment of the common people by the local governor he takes on the guise of the dashing Zorro, righting wrongs and slashing his distinctive graffiti all over the place. This puts him on a collision course with the authorities and the governors evil henchman played by Basil Rathbone. There is of course a pretty senorita involved who is impressed by the exploits of the daring Zorro, but less so by the effeminate Don Diego.

This is a hugely enjoyable romp through old California. Tyrone Power is perfectly cast as Don Diego aka Zorro, who is surely based on the similar Scarlet Pimpernel character! There is a particularly fine dance sequence where Power acquits himself extremely well! Basil Rathbone gets to demonstrate his fencing skills in a particularly good fight sequence. He also gets one of the best lines when he discovers a cache of stolen goods hidden by a member of the clergy, telling him “no wonder you joined the church”. I would agree with the other reviewers who believe this film is better than the 1998 version, despite boasting the intoxicating charms of Catherine Zeta-Jones. I have no idea how it stacks up against the 1920 version with Douglas Fairbanks, which I have never had the opportunity to see. If you love those brash old Hollywood movies you will love this one!


Decision at Sundown [DVD] [1957] [Region 1] [US Import] [NTSC]
Decision at Sundown [DVD] [1957] [Region 1] [US Import] [NTSC]
Offered by RAREWAVES USA
Price: £13.91

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Scott Goes Against Type, and it Ain't Half Bad., 7 Jan. 2015
Budd Boetticher was not only a very talented director who performed small miracles with small budgets, but he was also very honest with himself. When once interviewed about films in his famous ‘Ranown cycle’ where he collaborated with producer Harry Joe Brown, actor Randolph Scott and writer Burt Kennedy, he dismissed “Decision at Sundown" together with “Buchanan Rides Alone”, as inferior to others in the series. True that it is not as good as “The Tall T”, “Comanche Station” and especially “Ride Lonesome”, but it is still a mighty good western.

The difference as Boetticher pointed out was that the first two were written by Charles Lang and not his preferred writer Burt Kennedy, with whom he had a fruitful and happy relationship. In these films Scott is not quite the same silent assured ‘man of the west’. He is suddenly vulnerable and emotionally unstable. Not the usual Scott template, which makes for an interesting contrast. In this one Scott is the man who comes to town on a mission of vengeance. The town is in thrall to the man he is hunting played by John Carroll. Changes are afoot!

Plenty to admire here! There are some strong lines. The bartender says to the town doctor “Doc, if you’d been tending bars as long as me you wouldn’t expect so much of the human race”. He should know! Then we have a villain who goes against type in admitting that he is afraid. Boetticher always made his villains that little more interesting! The cast is a bit more lightweight than usual given Boetticher’s ability to find stars, but Noah Beery jnr, is dependable as ever as Scott’s sidekick, Andrew Duggan is good as a corrupt sheriff, and Ranown regular Karen Steele also provides good support. John Carroll, looking and sounding for all the world like a poor mans Clark Gable is perhaps one of Boetticher’s weaker villains, and how we miss the gorgeous Alabama Hills outdoor locations from some of the other films. Never mind, there is still plenty here to keep the fan happy!


St. Trinians - Blue Murder At St. Trinians [DVD]
St. Trinians - Blue Murder At St. Trinians [DVD]
Dvd ~ Joyce Grenfell
Price: £8.00

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The Usual Happy Fusion of Mayhem and Carnage., 5 Jan. 2015
The second in the series of St Trinian’s films, “Blue Murder” doesn’t quite reach the same riotous heights as “The Belles of St Trinian’s”, but it still manages to provide plenty of fun. This time the girls manage to win a trip to Rome, through utterly foul means of course, where they wreak carnage and mayhem with our continental friends. You only have to glance at the cast to realise that there will be treats in store, and there are!

Dizzy Joyce Grenfell steals scenes mercilessly as a ‘crazy mixed up Policewoman’. Terry Thomas is brilliant as always in his accustomed upper crust bounder role, this time playing the coach driver with designs on that dotty Policewoman. George Cole struts his stuff again as ‘Flash Harry’, accompanied by his distinctive theme music. Lionel Jefferies is very funny as a cross dressing jewel thief. Terry Scott also appears briefly as a desk Sergeant. Richard Wattis is kept busy pulling his hair out at the Ministry of Education. No shortage of laughs here!

Short skirts and hockey sticks are of course prominent! Hockey and water polo matches end up in the usual St Trinian’s scorched earth tactics. No prisoners are taken! There is a particularly funny dream sequence in the Colosseum where the girls take on some fearsome gladiators. I will let you guess who wins that one? At the end of the film Flash Harry says to Alastair Sim’s hilariously corrupt headmistress “See you later educator”. Sadly we did not see enough of him. Mr Sim’s merely bookended the film. A pity, but perhaps the esteemed actor was busy with other engagements? All great fun nevertheless!


Out Of Town - With Jack Hargreaves: Volume 4 [DVD]
Out Of Town - With Jack Hargreaves: Volume 4 [DVD]
Dvd ~ Out of Town
Offered by Todays Great Deal
Price: £9.18

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Rake Making for a Moonraker!, 4 Jan. 2015
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
I loved watching Jack Hargreaves on TV many years ago, when he presented from that atmospheric shed in his garden in the New Forest. It evoked another era, and you could almost smell the country in the air as you watched. Jack's films have become even more valuable with the passage of time and they are a priceless glimpse into a rural past that has been lost. His memory went back a long way and he had a genuine love of all country matters which comes through strongly in all these episodes. They are all equally watchable if you are interested in old country ways. Jack Hargreaves commentary is wonderfully natural and idiosyncratic, which matches the films perfectly. He has captured a countryside that has now all but vanished. His enthusiasm and wealth of country knowledge is obvious. Most importantly for us is that he wanted to pass that on. These films are his wonderful legacy to us.

This one contains the following: Episode 10 Lambing/Mayfly. Jack watches lambing in the traditional "Far from the Madding Crowd" style. He then explains the life cycle of the fascinating mayfly. Episode 11 Mole Catcher/High School Horse. Jack watches an old fashioned mole catcher going about his business and is then entertained by an elderly lady who really knows how to train a horse circus style. Episode 12 Rake Maker/Stagecoach. Jack watches an elderly gentleman making wooden rakes in the old style from ash poles. He is then treated to the strange sight of an American cowboy driving a stagecoach over the New Forest. Another man who really knows horses!

The episodes are all hugely enjoyable. As a proud Wiltshire 'Moonraker' I particularly enjoyed 'Rake Making' which showed how a beautiful handcrafted product is made with skilful hands and the right tools.! Even better now than when they were first shown. I have just managed to complete the whole series. Many were bought cheaply as used, but were in perfect condition. They seem to be rising in price recently due to scarcity and the last two were a little more expensive. Now might be a good time to buy them before they get really pricey. After this series there are the lost episodes to look forward to. Best watched with a pint of strong bottle conditioned beer in front of a wood burner on those long winter nights. A purely personal choice of course, but one I am sure Jack would have approved of.


Out Of Town - With Jack Hargreaves: Volume 7 [DVD]
Out Of Town - With Jack Hargreaves: Volume 7 [DVD]
Dvd ~ Out of Town
Offered by visualentertainmentvault
Price: £6.95

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars No Cheap Hotels or Fish and Chips on this trip to Spain!, 9 Dec. 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
I loved watching Jack Hargreaves on TV many years ago, when he presented from that atmospheric shed in his garden in the New Forest. It evoked another era, and you could almost smell the country in the air as you watched. Jack's films have become even more valuable with the passage of time and they are a priceless glimpse into a rural past that has been lost. His memory went back a long way and he had a genuine love of all country matters which comes through strongly in all these episodes. They are all equally watchable if you are interested in old country ways. Jack Hargreaves commentary is wonderfully natural and idiosyncratic, which matches the films that perfectly. The talented Stan Brehaut’s camera work has captured a countryside that has now all but vanished. Jack’s enthusiasm for his subject matter and his wealth of country knowledge is obvious! Most importantly for us is that he wanted to pass that on. These films are his wonderful legacy to us.

This one contains the following: Episode 19 Stour River. This is an informative guide to the natural history of a river. Jack also gives us his mothers Yorkshire farmhouse recipe for liver onions. Yummy! Episode 20 Hacienda/Bullfight. Jack visits Spain, but this is not the Spain of cheap hotels and fish and chips! He voices his disapproval of bullfighting, and it should be noted that there are no scenes of animal cruelty. Episode 21 House Building/Trout and Grayling. Jack shows us ancient building methods in the New Forest and fishes on the hallowed waters of the river Test for Grayling. The episodes are all a delight. I particularly enjoyed watching him fish for Grayling, which reminded me of youthful days pursuing that most beautiful of fish on the Kennet. The analogy he uses to explain the perceived gaming differences between trout, grayling and coarse fish is not one that could be used today! The trip to Spain seemed to pay homage to the magnificent series theme music ‘Recuerdos de la Alhambra’ by the great Spanish composer/guitarist Francisco Tarrega. Now is a good time to buy these films! They have dropped in price considerably from when they were first released, and can be picked up for a bargain price at the time of this review if you are prepared to buy used DVD's as I do. No regrets there! That price could change as they become more scarce! I am currently working my way through the whole series and am simply devouring them. After that there are the lost episodes to look forward to. Best enjoyed with a pint of strong bottle conditioned beer in front of a wood burner on those long winter nights! A purely personal choice of course, but one I am sure Jack would have approved of.


Page: 1-10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21-30