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The virgin soldiers
The virgin soldiers
by Leslie Thomas
Edition: Hardcover

4.0 out of 5 stars Not Funny But Interesting, 28 Jun 2014
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This review is from: The virgin soldiers (Hardcover)
Heard about this book on BBC Good Read as one of the finalists of Funniest Book. Didn't find it very funny but interesting.


Missing Out: In Praise of the Unlived Life
Missing Out: In Praise of the Unlived Life
by Adam Phillips
Edition: Paperback
Price: £8.50

1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Pack of Quotes..., 28 Jun 2014
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It looks like the author shows off how much he knows/reads... full of quotes which does not seem to related to the title very much...


The End of Belonging: Untold stories of leaving home and the psychology of global relocation
The End of Belonging: Untold stories of leaving home and the psychology of global relocation
by Greg A. Madison
Edition: Paperback
Price: £10.97

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The End of Belonging, 18 April 2011
This book explained my long lasting question.

For the last 8 years since I began working abroad, whenever I went back to the country where I was born and lived most of my life, I felt I did not belong there any longer, except in a superficial way. Although I went along with all sorts of institutional routines because I felt I had to, something private in me resisted that I belong there. In return, my country would not want me to claim otherwise. It seems like there is a mutual agreed distance that seems to suit both of us.

I have envied many friends who had lived in the same place all their lives, or who had done well in accepted ways, or who truly belonged. Over a pint of beer or diner table, when I attempted to explain the depth of the loss, no one even my closest childhood friends could understand. I felt more lost and alone at home than in the most foreign and unfamiliar places.

What happened to me? Where do I belong? Have I lost my home?

The closest explanation I could get was to cut and paste of quotes from people who happened to be my colleagues or acquaintances of the exile, the expatriate and the émigré from numerous parties. However, the question still remains unanswered.

Is it because I am genuinely different, objectively an outsider, or because I am temporarily a loner, or I am personally more attracted to maybe little more income and exotic life?

This is a big question and a personal one, and I do not want to share my answers. However, I can say that after having finished this book, I had better answer to the question and I understand that I will never belong there again because I can never again be myself there.

The End of Belonging. Untold Stories of leaving home and the psychology of global relocation
The End of Belonging


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