Profile for Angel Jem > Reviews

Personal Profile

Content by Angel Jem
Top Reviewer Ranking: 1,797
Helpful Votes: 1549

Learn more about Your Profile.

Reviews Written by
Angel Jem "Angel Jem" (Liverpool, Merseyside United Kingdom)
(VINE VOICE)   

Show:  
Page: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11-13
pixel
May 1812
May 1812
by M.M. Bennetts
Edition: Paperback
Price: £13.99

3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Disappointing and not what I expected., 24 Feb. 2011
This review is from: May 1812 (Paperback)
Customer review from the Amazon Vine Programme (What's this?)
The story bears very little relationship to the blurb on the back, which gives the impression that it will be primarily a spy story set in the Napoleonic wars, whereas it is actually the story of a couple who enter into an arranged marriage at a couple of days notice. People who pick it up expecting a new Sharpe will be surprised to find it bears more resemblance to Georgette Heyer. The dialogue is extreme, sometimes meaning you have to stop and figure out what things mean. It may possibly be genuine Georgian parlance, but the result is to make the reading very cumbersome for the modern reader. Not a page turner, but readable enough.


Samsung YP-U6AP U6 4GB MP3 with FM Radio and USB Slide - Pink
Samsung YP-U6AP U6 4GB MP3 with FM Radio and USB Slide - Pink

4.0 out of 5 stars Good features in a slim size, 24 Feb. 2011
Customer review from the Amazon Vine Programme (What's this?)
The Samsung U6 has a few really good features packed into a small space. It has a good sized 4GB memory, an easy to use navigation method and packs in a voice recorder and a usb port in a body not much bigger than your thumb. This version is madly pink, so I soon passed it on to my 9 year old daughter. She found the small sized buttons no problem to control, and the external appearance held its own against her friends small ipod. The body is metal, but brushed so that it had a funky feel. I loved the ease of loading, plug into the USB port, connect to Windows media and sync and you're away. Generally excellent value for a competitive price.


Empire of Silver (Conqueror, Book 4) (Conqueror 4)
Empire of Silver (Conqueror, Book 4) (Conqueror 4)
by Conn Iggulden
Edition: Hardcover

1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Good but missing Ghengis, 24 Feb. 2011
Customer review from the Amazon Vine Programme (What's this?)
Readers of this book should be those who have read the other three books in the Conqueror series, Wolf of the Plains (Conqueror 1), Lords of the Bow (Conqueror 2), and Bones of the Hills (Conqueror 3) and be ready for the next instalment on the Khan family.
It could be read as a stand alone, but the back story won't be familiar and the back story with Ghengis is a good one.
And therein lies the problem. The story is good and the book is good and the characterisation is good.... but it all misses the mad power that was Ghengis. He dominates the first three books and provides such vigor to them that the story of his heirs is just lacking something. I just feel that a person who doesn't read the first three will not feel that the next book is one to read, which is a shame because at some point the story will be about Kubla Khan and he also was a strong character.
In a set of five or more, this book fits in as a time filler, but get the first three and give yourself a treat before you tread water with the Empire of Silver.


The Mindful Manifesto: How doing less and noticing more can help us thrive in a stressed-out world
The Mindful Manifesto: How doing less and noticing more can help us thrive in a stressed-out world
by Dr Jonty Heaversedge
Edition: Paperback

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Living in and of the moment is crucial to our lives today, 10 Jan. 2011
Customer review from the Amazon Vine Programme (What's this?)
I really enjoyed this book. At a time of stress, living in the moment is a really grounding thing to do.... and so difficult. Heaversedge and Halliwell have tried hard to put together a useable manifesto for recapturing the moments of life that we let slip past too often. For beginners, it is a good read, a starting point to lead you in. More experienced and deeper Mindful people need to look for more. For me, the ideas in the book are useful.... and I need to be more mindful more often. Wish me luck.


The Life and Opinions of Maf the Dog, and of his friend Marilyn Monroe
The Life and Opinions of Maf the Dog, and of his friend Marilyn Monroe
by Andrew O'Hagan
Edition: Paperback
Price: £12.99

2.0 out of 5 stars PLease, it's too sweet., 10 Jan. 2011
Customer review from the Amazon Vine Programme (What's this?)
At first I thought the idea of the dog telling the story would be enchanting, appealing, and weirdly good. But I so did not enjoy this book in the end because the dog was enchanting, appealing and weird. I suspect it might be a bit of a marmite book, love it or hate it, and good luck to the people who loved it but I am firmly in the hate camp.
I wonder if the Legend that is Marilyn defies treatment like this, as a comedy and companion to a dog. I don't know. I didn't like the personification of the dog, so he lost me from the start.


State of Emergency: The Way We Were: Britain, 1970-1974
State of Emergency: The Way We Were: Britain, 1970-1974
by Dominic Sandbrook
Edition: Hardcover

4 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent review and analysis of the politics and culture of the early seventies., 10 Jan. 2011
Customer review from the Amazon Vine Programme (What's this?)
The period of history covered in this book is a by word for emergency, recession, union troubles, Morecambe and Wise and Doctor Who. Talk to anyone who lived through them as an adult and it's a tale of shortages (home made bread, anyone?) and turmoil as Oil Sheiks and Union Dragons stamped their feet. To one such as me (aged 2 as it started and 6 when it finished) it was a time of good TV, funny trousers and macrame. Why macrame? I don't know.
Dominic Sandbrook has produced a really readable book where the political situation is contrasted and enhanced by chapters on the social history at the time. One particularly memorable part deals with Sarah Jane Smith, my heroine, who gets awarded a lot of responsibility for Women's Lib gaining popularity as the decade passed since she was such a 'liberated' woman. This use of both politics and social history lifts what could so easily have been a dry discourse on the cyclical nature of history into a really well written and readable tome that will be useful as a guide to why the early seventies are staging a comeback right here right now. Read it and mark the similarities.... and then decide what our solution now should be.


Delirium (Delirium Trilogy 1)
Delirium (Delirium Trilogy 1)
by Lauren Oliver
Edition: Hardcover

2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Teenage love gets a make over, 10 Jan. 2011
Customer review from the Amazon Vine Programme (What's this?)
Everybody's heard of someone being lovesick, yes? Well in this future dystopian America (I love the word dystopia) Love has been declared an illness.... and there is a cure! One simple operation and no more lovesickness!!! It sounds ideal... apart from it doesn't just destroy romantic love. It sort of puts the kybosh on any love based relationship. And that's hard. No loving mother, no loving nursery teachers, no really loving older siblings. The cure is administered at 18, but can be given before, and not taking it is not an option.
Lena is nearly 18 and being screened to see who they will match her with (your life partner is picked from a list) when cows rampage through the labs, the tests draw to a halt and Lena sees a young man who makes her heart go boom. Literally love at first sight.
The story line is interesting and I passed this book over to my 16 year old nieces who are, I think, the intended audience. They loved the book. They really enjoyed the story which is a lot like Brave New World.for teenagers crossed with the doomed love of Romeo and Juliet (Penguin Popular Classics) and hints of brain manipulation a la The Host. Indeed, I think this last book is possibly the closest relative to Delirium. It definitely struck me on reading it that the Twi-hards pining for lost love would enjoy reading this one as well.... and so far I've been right! Dedicated Science Fiction readers will find much to complain about if they are seeking political and medical truths and justifications for the story, but as long as you suspend your belief in reality and let the love shine through it is a good read.


Two Serious Ladies
Two Serious Ladies
by Jane Bowles
Edition: Paperback
Price: £7.99

0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars It's OK but..., 29 Nov. 2010
This review is from: Two Serious Ladies (Paperback)
Customer review from the Amazon Vine Programme (What's this?)
Perhaps I have been spoilt by Persephone books whose reissued novels of 1940's ladies have got me into a provincial mentality, but I didn't enjoy this book. It's not the book, it's me. I love the domestic and the banal, the shopping and the tea making, the little details of house and home.... and this novel so isn't like that.
It would suit readers of Truman Capote and Graham Greene, it has a plot that rests on the two serious ladies of the title; the eccentric throwing off of contemporary acceptable behaviour and the living of lives that for the title characters become increasingly frantic. It is daring, it is original.... and thereby lies my problem. Perhaps I'm just too moralistic; I recognise the good writing but judge the plot by morals that just can't be used here. If you like Breakfast at Tiffany's: WITH House of Flowers (Penguin Modern Classics) or The Quiet American: Centenary Celebration 2004 you will like this. If you like Miss Pettigrew Lives for a Day (Persephone Classics) then find the next Persephone novel; this is so different. You have been warned.


The Private Patient: Radio Drama (Adam Dalgliesh Mysteries)
The Private Patient: Radio Drama (Adam Dalgliesh Mysteries)
by P D James
Edition: Audio CD

4.0 out of 5 stars Well adapted and very enjoyable version, 29 Nov. 2010
Customer review from the Amazon Vine Programme (What's this?)
P D James writes very good, very literate stories. Her novels are a delight to read and this adaptation by the BBC has made this one into a very enjoyable and satisfactory audio version.
Although it was originally broadcast as a series of 15 minute episodes, the cut offs are virtually seamless; no clunky cliffhangers, just a smooth narrative flow. The book has been well-adapted and the story is clear and succinct. A death in a private plastic surgery clinic leads to Adam Dalgliesh being summoned to Dorset and to an investigation to discover family secrets and betrayals along the way. Within the 2 and a bit hour format, all the plot threads are introduced, explored and completed without seeming to race too quickly. A thoroughly good listen.
We found that the first few minutes we spent listening to Adam Dalgliesh were strange, but only because we're used to Roy Marsden in the role. But you soon become accustomed to the voices. It's part-narrated and part-dramatised so that you get the best of both worlds, really; an interesting array of voices and emotions portraying the people but also the narration to explain place and inner thoughts that can be hard to get across on radio when the visual cues of acting are removed. All in all a thoroughly recommendable audio production.


Doctor Who: The Runaway Train (BBC Audio)
Doctor Who: The Runaway Train (BBC Audio)
by Oli Smith
Edition: Audio CD
Price: £9.25

5.0 out of 5 stars Another fantastic audiobook for Dr Who, 29 Nov. 2010
Customer review from the Amazon Vine Programme (What's this?)
Car journeys pass quicker with a decent audio book and this one took us to Leicester with no complaints.
The Doctor and Amy (Pond; like her a lot) land in Civil War America and have to save the world from an exploding Terra forming bomb. How they do it displays the usual level of inventiveness that Dr Who writers have to have. I'd love to know how they do their shopping, since thinking of alternative ways of doing things is so usual to them. Probably online, actually.
The scrapes, friends and resolution of the story will keep avid fans aged 8 to 14 happy listening. The funniest part was when Pond came out and they described her outfit... when my husband and I looked at each other with a disappointed gleam. Wouldn't a saloon bar dress have given the Dads something to think of on acold winter's night? But, thank Goodness, Pond kept her modesty blazing in a decent skirt and no worrying age-unsuitable material.


Page: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11-13