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Dependency Injection in .NET
Dependency Injection in .NET
by Mark Seemann
Edition: Paperback
Price: £27.22

4.0 out of 5 stars First of all it's an excellent introduction to Dependency Injection and I would definitely recommend ..., 3 Jan. 2016
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
First of all it's an excellent introduction to Dependency Injection and I would definitely recommend it. I won't cover the good stuff because other reviews have already. I do however wish to voice a few gripes. This should not put you off from buying the book, it's more directed at the author.

1. Almost every chapter (except the ones on DI Containers) starts with an analogy, mostly involving food preparation. I found these distracting and annoying. Surely this book's chapters aren't such esoteric topics for the target audience that we require examples from another domain. As I am neither a chef nor a foodie I did not find them enlightening, and spent more time trying to understand how the example was relevant than actually understanding the concept in its proper context.

2. Each chapter spent too long summarising what it was going to be telling me. I don't think a two page summary at the start of each chapter is necessary. An index can tell me what each chapter holds. This was an issue not only at the start of the chapters but also throughout; the sections making up the chapter frequently ended by summarising what they had told me. I don't need to know that - I've just read the text! Repetition can be very annoying.

Overall the author should have just got to the point and been more concise. When he did though, it was an enjoyable and informative read.


Sony Digital Noise Cancelling In-Ear Headphones with Built-In Microphone Compatible with Sony Devices with Digital Noise Cancellation - Black
Sony Digital Noise Cancelling In-Ear Headphones with Built-In Microphone Compatible with Sony Devices with Digital Noise Cancellation - Black
Price: £17.90

1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Doesn't work with the S4, 7 Dec. 2015
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
These earphones don't plug in properly to the Galaxy S4! I tried the pair I received as well as a pair from a colleague who has the same model, and neither plug in properly to the S4. Basically when you plug them in, you don't hear/feel that final "click" that you get when it plugs in all the way. So half the time the phone doesn't recognise that anything is plugged in, and when it does then the sound is all tinny, which is exactly what happens when headphones aren't plugged in fully. Pity as the MDR-EX310 plugged in perfectly and were brilliant, and I thought these would be their successors.


The Art of Unit Testing: with examples in C#
The Art of Unit Testing: with examples in C#
by Roy Osherove
Edition: Paperback
Price: £20.63

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Good but code examples have issues, 7 Dec. 2015
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Overall the book is a good introduction to unit testing and I'd recommend it. However there is one thing I found very annoying, and that is the consistent typos and indentation issues in the code examples. Almost every single code example has some random extra space or three at the start of some lines. It's quite annoying when that happens because your mind then has to wonder whether it's indented for a reason, since it associates indentation with specific things... no, just a random indentation again. And then it appears that the code was not written in an IDE but rather just typed on the fly in notepad or something, because there are certain code examples that contain typos which would prevent it from compiling and would show as errors whilst typing in an IDE. Nothing major, it doesn't stop you from understanding what the author is trying to show, but it's just something that adds to the annoyance I feel whilst reading the code. I mean the rest of the book is fine, but almost all the code examples have problems (whether formatting or actual typos) - why? This is the second edition of the book as well!

Anyway as I said it doesn't really detract from the book in a meaningful way, if you want to learn unit testing then I'd still recommend it, it's just an annoyance I wanted to air.


Samsung Galaxy S4 Screen Protector, MediaDevil Magicscreen Crystal Clear (Invisible) Edition - (2 x Protectors)
Samsung Galaxy S4 Screen Protector, MediaDevil Magicscreen Crystal Clear (Invisible) Edition - (2 x Protectors)
Offered by MediaDevil
Price: £11.97

5.0 out of 5 stars Brilliant, 5 July 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
I cleaned my S4's screen using the cloth included with the protector (and my breath to moisten the screen); then followed their instructions for application of the protector. No problems with bubbles or trapped dust (then again I ensured the screen was perfectly clean before attempting to apply it). Couldn't be simpler and it looks great.

One other thing to point out was I bought it on Wednesday afternoon, received a notification a couple hours later that it had been dispatched (I thought "right, sure it has...") and received it the next morning - all with the standard free shipping. Probably the quickest I ever received anything ordered with free shipping from Amazon.


Kindle, 6" E Ink Display, Wi-Fi, Graphite
Kindle, 6" E Ink Display, Wi-Fi, Graphite

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Brilliant, 8 Nov. 2011
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
I use it mainly for reading news articles and technical books. The news articles I paste into Word and save as HTML, then send them to the kindle email for transfer to my kindle. Books instead I mostly convert ones I already own in PDF format. The trick to getting a PDF book to convert properly to mobi, images and all, is to OCR the book, save as html, then convert (using Calibre) to mobi.

Nothing imo can replace the feel and sight of an actual book; however I personally am unable to accumulate a book collection due to my fluid situation, and am actually in the process of selling off my 200+ book library. In this situation it's very useful to be able to have my book and papers collection on my kindle, so I can travel light and not worry about transporting my library. Plus it's actually quite nice to read on the kindle. You need good light, and I find it more difficult to read on the kindle than paper in dim light. But if you've got good light - for example if you're outdoors, or have a proper reading light - then reading on it is a pleasure. No complaints re: button placement, screen, software, etc.
Comment Comment (1) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Nov 13, 2011 5:05 PM GMT


Secrets of Temple: How the Federal Reserve Runs the Country
Secrets of Temple: How the Federal Reserve Runs the Country
by Greider
Edition: Paperback
Price: £9.95

4.0 out of 5 stars Interesting, 16 Sept. 2011
First of all don't be put off by the title: this is not a conspiracy theory book. It's actually a mostly descriptive account of the Federal Reserve during Paul Volker's reign. It starts just before Volker is appointed, progresses a bit and then goes back to the beginning of how and why the Fed was created. It follows the Fed from its beginning and eventually winds back up where it started, and the current (at the time) narrative resumes. It ends around the end of Volker's term, 1987 I think.

The book talks about a number of things, but mainly the effects of Volker's monetary policies on the real economy, and the relationship between the Fed and the elected government.

Overall it's an interesting book, and is quite an easy read. However his bias does show through more and more as the book progresses. He often complains about the inequitable effects of some policy, but only when the policy favours the "credit class"; that is, the lenders. But when the tables are turned it's a case of "well they're not really losing money, just not making as much as they'd like - it doesn't affect them anyway, they're rich enough". That attitude gets annoying after a while. Or he'll cry about the fact that some industry is hurt by a policy and say "they *could* have done x if they really wanted to help them" while ignoring the fact that others would in turn be hurt by that proposed change. Or he's constantly harping on the way the tax cuts benefited those in the highest tax band and therefore the richest, ignoring that, being in the highest tax band, they are already being punished disproportionately for their high incomes by having the government rob half of it. He only complains when they get some reprieve from that injustice, as if excessive tax is how it should be. He cares very much about goods and pooh-poohs the services sector.

Basically it's a good enough book and I would probably recommend it but it could do with more factual description and less moral outrage. I haven't read any other book on the Fed so can't say how it compares, but I suspect there are better books out there. This would probably appeal to those who are of a more liberal inclination, and those who wish to get a decent understanding of the fed and how they work in easy to understand terms; but if you're looking for a comprehensive or rigorous examination of monetary policy and central banking, look elsewhere.

I'm giving it 4 stars because, although I have complaints, by and large it is a good and enjoyable look at those times.


The Bond Book, Third Edition: Everything Investors Need to Know About Treasuries, Municipals, GNMAs, Corporates, Zeros, Bond Funds, Money Market Funds, and More
The Bond Book, Third Edition: Everything Investors Need to Know About Treasuries, Municipals, GNMAs, Corporates, Zeros, Bond Funds, Money Market Funds, and More
by Annette Thau
Edition: Hardcover
Price: £27.99

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars For newbie private investors only, 20 Aug. 2011
I am quite disappointed with this book. What I was looking for was a book geared toward people with no knowledge of the bond market, to give me a solid understanding of all the ins and outs of the basics, creating a solid foundation from which I could progress to more advanced books if I felt necessary. What I got instead was a book that spent very little time on the basics, moving quickly instead to focusing on investing in bonds. Don't get me wrong - I'm not saying this book is difficult for a beginner.

Let me first say that I am not interested in investing in/trading bonds. What I want is to have a good understanding of the bond market. I want to know precisely why certain things affect prices. I want to be able to read a piece of news and understand what effect that may have on various bonds. I don't mean some sort of mantra "If interest rates rise...", I mean I want a deep understanding in order to analyse scenarios and form my own conclusions for any variety of events that happen in the world. Therefore I am specifically interested in it from an institutional and sovereign perspective.

I felt this book was very shallow on the basics. It often made statements without explaining why it was so. It seemed in a rush to get to talking about investing, sacrificing a solid and detailed explanation of fundamentals in the process. Even from an investing perspective, I felt it was very simplistic. It reminded me of those books I used to read which gave a shallow explanation of a market and then some largely useless strategies for trading it. I skimmed about half the book as I found much of it completely irrelevant. I'm not interested in investing in funds from a "user" perspective; I don't want to hear warnings about investing in emerging markets; I don't care about what websites give end of day prices; I want to learn about BONDS from the ground up, information which I can use in analysis. This book was largely useless in that respect.

I'd give it 3.5 stars; it's not all that bad if you're in the target audience or just want someone to tell you what to do without thinking much for yourself, but caveat emptor: make sure you know what you're getting. I'm going to read Fabozzi's Handbook of Fixed Income Securities and Stigum's Money Market, from what I've seen these books have what I need and are better for the "newbie" who wants to gain a proper understanding of these securities.
Comment Comment (1) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Dec 1, 2012 4:25 PM GMT


Time Compression Trading: Exploiting Multiple Time Frames in Zero Sum Markets (Wiley Trading)
Time Compression Trading: Exploiting Multiple Time Frames in Zero Sum Markets (Wiley Trading)
by Jason Alan Jankovsky
Edition: Hardcover
Price: £47.50

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Excellent book, minus a few quibbles, 2 Jan. 2011
This is the first book I've read that approaches the market from both a practitioner's POV (i.e. non-academic) and an order flow mindset. I very much enjoyed the first two sections, where he talked about the losers in a zero sum game, the fallacy of technical analysis, and more. I already viewed the markets from this perspective, but it was nice to hear someone else talk about my favourite subject, and he also expounded on a few areas I hadn't given much thought to, so overall it was an excellent read.

The other/last two sections, on the other hand, were sort of based on some premises which I didn't agree with. For example, that the lower timeframe trader is the loser and the higher timeframe trader the winner. Also that the lower timeframe trader trades using the same concepts as the higher timeframe traders, such as trends. Now I suppose it is entirely likely that the majority of losers on lower timeframes are in fact using technical analysis and entering at the wrong places. However they would not automatically become winning traders using the same analysis on the higher timeframes. Jason does indeed mention this, that they not only need to move to the more "dominant" (higher) timeframe, but also change their approach. Why then does he use "incorrect" methods of analysis on the lower timeframe examples and "correct" analysis on the higher ones? You cannot compare the two like that. If the method is at fault, then the same method should be used on the lower and higher TFs to show that the method doesn't work. If the use of lower TFs is at fault, and the method isn't, then show that the method works on the higher TFs and not on the lower ones.

I know his point was that both the technical analysis method and the lower timeframes were incorrect, causing losses. But the point is ineffectually made by using a different method of analysis on the higher timeframe. He doesn't show us what happens when using the "correct" method on the lower timeframe. If it worked, then why constantly point to lower timeframe traders as the losers, when it's the method at fault? If it didn't work, then for the sake of consistency and clarity, use the same method on both timeframes.

To conclude this lengthy point, it is my opinion that order flow on the lower timeframes is best viewed differently from typical longer-term analysis (i.e. trend trading). A lower timeframe shows in more detail exactly how the order flow is affecting the market in the short term, where imbalances are building, what the short term market is "thinking" or what its intentions are. This is best traded in a different way from the typical technical analysis Jankovsky uses on his lower timeframe examples.
However, I must also say that whilst this issue was a pet peeve of mine, the second two parts are overall quite good and will probably help most people (they've given me some stuff to think about as well). I'm not saying its conclusions are wrong at all, I just took exception to his blanket statement of "this is how lower timeframe traders trade, and lower timeframe traders are losers".

All in all though, I heartily recommend this book to anyone wondering why their technical analysis isn't working as the many books say it should, or anyone with an interest in order flow. I should also note that this isn't about order flow as in "time and sales, L2, etc.", this is about viewing the market from an order flow mindset. I will also recommend another two books to go along with this:
1. Trading and Exchanges by Larry Harris.
T&E is a dry but excellent book which will give you a solid factual grounding in how exactly markets work, how and why prices move, who trades and why, etc. In my opinion this is the most important book on the markets a retail trader can own, and if you are not familiar with its contents, you will likely have an understanding of the markets which is not based on reality but on fantasy which you picked up from other books, trading forums, the many charlatans in the education business, your own baseless, faulty logic. How can you expect to profit if your premises are flawed? I would recommend you read T&E before this or any other book. You'll be amazed how much other information floating about you'll be able to dismiss out of hand after reading this book, simply because you'll be able to spot a system or premise that is not grounded in reality from a mile away.
2. The Art of the Trade
This isn't a "must read", but it helps understand where the author's coming from, and also what precisely he means by "conflict" which is a work he uses often in this book. An easy, enjoyable read.


The Microstructure Approach to Exchange Rates
The Microstructure Approach to Exchange Rates
by Richard K Lyons
Edition: Paperback
Price: £17.92

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Understand FX Dealers, 20 Aug. 2010
This is a good book to get an understanding of how fx dealers work. Though the maths were over my head, it was easy enough to read the non-equation parts and understand what was said. One caveat - although research is still being done in this area, it appears the adverse selection spread model is incorrect for this market. (See Osler's paper "Price Discovery in Currency Markets".)


Trading and Exchanges Market Microstructure for Practitioners (Financial Management Association Survey and Synthesis)
Trading and Exchanges Market Microstructure for Practitioners (Financial Management Association Survey and Synthesis)
by Larry Harris
Edition: Hardcover
Price: £55.00

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Required reading, 1 July 2010
This is an excellent book about market microstructure (as the title suggests...), the various players and their purposes, price discovery, liquidity, orders, types of markets, regulations, and a lot more that doesn't come to mind. If you want to understand markets, if you want to understand why price moves, this is the book.


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