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Y. Johnston
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Salter Arc Electronic Scale, White
Salter Arc Electronic Scale, White
Offered by AP Motor Store
Price: £12.67

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Stopped working after six months, 29 Mar 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
I gather from reading reviews for this and the black version on here that I am not the first person to discover that the scales which seemed good value and ideal for a short while malfunction after a few months use.


The Dead Songbird (The Northminster Mysteries Book 2)
The Dead Songbird (The Northminster Mysteries Book 2)
Price: £1.88

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Giles and Felix ride again., 28 Feb 2013
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I was very much looking forward to reading this follow up to The Butchered Man and I have not been disappointed.
While The Butchered Man stormed off at quite a pace, The Dead Songbird is a slower, more pensive detective novel. There are moments of high drama (which I will not go into for fear of spoilers) but, on the whole, it goes at a steady pace with much tension and conflict revealed through superficially polite Victorian dialogue and manners. Harriet Smart is able to produce Victorian pastiche which feels authentic rather than melodramatic or comic.
This novel, like its predecessor, is set in the fictional city of Northminster where Major Giles Vernon, Victorian police chief and his sidekick, Mr.(he is a surgeon) Felix Carswell, the police forensics expert, bring criminals to justice. The two are deeply flawed but fundamentally good men and I enjoyed the way their characters are developed further in this second novel in the series. The novel is narrated from the (alternating) viewpoints of Giles and Felix; a narrative style which makes me feel comfortable. (I have a real problem with novels narrated from too many viewpoints).
The settings are described well but sparingly. I could picture Northminster well without getting bogged down by overlong passages of descriptive prose - which is often a feature of other novels in this genre.
I look forward to reading Northminster #3


The Revelations
The Revelations
Price: £4.49

2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars God With Mamon, 4 May 2012
This review is from: The Revelations (Kindle Edition)
Once upon a time Evangelical Christianity picked up the dispossessed of society. In the 21st century, its newer incarnation, 'The Course' seeks out the wealthy and connected, in particular the young and affluent who may have become disillusioned and are looking for a spiritual life but one they can pick up ready-made without having ever to experience any dark night of the soul en route to it. In other words, faith has become a commodity to be purchased, just like everything else in their lives. And the monopoly selling this brand is 'The Course' led by the creepily Charismatic David Nightingale, one of the least Christian clergymen in literature.
Well, the opinions on The Revelations are, to say the least, polarised if this review site is anything to go by. I found the novel very interesting. I believed in the characters probably more than many of the characters really seemed to believe in Christianity. The characters were deeply flawed but I did not dislike them. I reserved my dislike for the Rev. and his even seedier friend the 'Earl'.
I found the narrative style and pace gripping and read the novel in a few hours over the course of a couple of days. There is no happy ever after ending and I felt empathy for the characters though I really felt that their excessive consumption of alcohol was as responsible for their problems just as much as their espousal of the dogma of a quasi cult in which sexual morality was paramount while financial concupiscence was par for 'the course'.
My only minor difficultly was with the final 'revelation' at the very end of the novel. I will not go into detail as it would be a spoiler but it caused me to reconsider totally one of the main characters. I just could not buy into that one.
All in all a very good novel I thought.


A Dark Redemption: Carrigan and Miller 1
A Dark Redemption: Carrigan and Miller 1
Price: £2.99

27 of 27 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Murder in London Linked with the Ugandan Heart of Darkness, 26 Mar 2012
So, I started reading a novel that sounded like a regular police procedural about a murdered student in London and ended up reading about Northern Ugandan politics and warfare, Joseph Kony and child soldiers too.
A Dark Redemption is an excellent, thoroughly well written, crime thriller. The main cop protagonists, DI Carrigan and DS Miller, are very well rounded and complex characters whose back-stories are fed to us sparingly, droplet by droplet. This, together with a fast paced complex plot, made A Dark Redemption a novel which I found very hard to put down.
It is also a novel about how decisions in the past can return to haunt us in the present. I very much enjoyed reading this novel.


The Somnambulist
The Somnambulist
Price: £5.49

3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Somnambulist, 10 Mar 2012
This review is from: The Somnambulist (Kindle Edition)
I very much enjoyed The Somnambulist. Right from the start I found myself sucked into the world of Phoebe Turner, the young narrator of a tale which twists and turns around mysteries and secrets from the past. It was a page-turning read and full of well drawn and and interesting characters. The places described in the novel were more than just setting. Wilton's Music Hall and Dinwood Court were as much characters in the novel as any of the people who inhabited them. I highly recommend this novel.


Kiss Me Quick
Kiss Me Quick
by Danny Miller
Edition: Paperback
Price: £5.73

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars More Vince please., 10 Mar 2012
This review is from: Kiss Me Quick (Paperback)
I thoroughly enjoyed this novel. It was well written with a great 'retro' 1960s feel. Yes, I did spot the odd anachronism but I was happy to overlook such as none was of real importance to the story. I think Danny Miller has created a refreshingly new type of detective here. For one thing, he's teetotal. But he is by no means free of emotional baggage. An interesting character and I hope to read more about him.
My only criticism - rather too much eye-related gore.


Drowning Rose
Drowning Rose
by Marika Cobbold
Edition: Paperback
Price: £10.56

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The most thought provoking novel I have read in ages., 22 Oct 2011
This review is from: Drowning Rose (Paperback)
'Drowning Rose' is a lovely novel. I don't want to provide any spoilers here so will not mention the plot.
It is a novel about guilt and how lives are lived in the shadow of chance events that happened many years ago. It is quite the most thought provoking novel I have read in ages. Marika Cobbold has created some wonderfully rounded characters here. She is particularly good at recreating the emotional lives of teenage girls as seen through the point of view one of the characters. Throughout the novel, despite the serious themes explored, there is a gentle sense of humour present which makes it a truly enjoyable read.


My Memories of a Future Life - the complete novel
My Memories of a Future Life - the complete novel
Price: £4.50

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars If music be the food of fiction, 21 Sep 2011
Roz Morris' novel 'My Memories of a Future Life' was rather different from my usual reading matter. I read mainly crime and historical novels and tend not to read anything that could be remotely described as 'fantasy'. However, I was hooked from the start of this novel and kept on reading it while it got more and more 'weird' as the protagonist, Carol (the novel is written from a first person point of view) fell under the spell of a mysterious hypnotist she vaguely remembered from her schooldays. While in hypnosis Carol does the opposite of regression ('progression' perhaps?) and becomes a man called Andreq, an inhabitant of a future underwater city. All this happens against the backdrop of everyday London and a fictional coastal village in the south-west.
The novel is pacy and the characterisation is subtle and intelligent. I enjoyed the strongly musical theme which ran through the novel (Carol is a concert pianist who is suffering from RSI) and even learnt something new - the novel had me Googling the topic of 'enharmonic pianos'.
I have now read many novels in Kindle format (I read this in its original 4 episode format) and have to mention the fact that this novel had the fewest number of typos I have ever seen in an e-books. There was some excellent proofing & editing done here!


Into the Darkest Corner
Into the Darkest Corner

5.0 out of 5 stars A Page-Turning Dark Psychological Thriller, 21 Feb 2011
This novel was hard to put down. It gripped me from the beginning. I particularly liked the two parallel-running time frames, four years apart. This was a great device for showing up the contrast between the pre and post trauma narrator.
With the exception of two court room scenes at the start and end of the novel, and one third-person narrated prologue, the novel has a first person narrator. This is a great example of an unreliable narrator - a woman who has suffered severe physical and mental abuse but whose version of events is doubted by many. Sometimes she even doubts her own perception of what is happening.
The writing holds you and places you on a knife edge. You are constantly expecting a shock and the final confrontation had me actually biting my nails!
I await Elizabeth Haynes' next novel with great anticipation.


The Butchered Man (The Northminster Mysteries Book 1)
The Butchered Man (The Northminster Mysteries Book 1)
Price: £1.80

7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Book Review: `The Butchered Man' by Harriet Smart, 2 Jan 2011
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`The Butchered Man' is a historical detective story set in the fictional city of Northminster in 1840. It opens with the arrival of Felix Carswell M.D., the newly-appointed police surgeon to the City of Northminster Constabulary whose Chief Constable is one Major Giles Vernon.

Within hours of Felix's arrival, a dead and butchered body has been found and so begins what is a truly page-turning detective story told from the viewpoints of Carswell and Vernon. With these protagonists, Harriet Smart has created a pair of detectives that I hope to see more of in the future. They move between the lofty dwellings of the senior clergy in the Minster precincts, through the homes of the affluent trades-people to the outskirts of the city where prostitutes solicit and drunkards brawl.

Both Vernon and Carswell are likeable but flawed characters and it is the roundness of the characterisation which makes this novel so good. I would have liked to have read a little more of the back-story of Vernon but I suspect that is being held back as further Northminster Mysteries are planned. I do hope this will be the case as this has definitely left me waiting for more!
Comment Comments (2) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Feb 7, 2011 8:58 PM GMT


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