Profile for D. S. John > Reviews

Personal Profile

Content by D. S. John
Top Reviewer Ranking: 269,223
Helpful Votes: 52

Learn more about Your Profile.

Reviews Written by
D. S. John (CARDIFF United Kingdom)
(REAL NAME)   

Show:  
Page: 1 | 2
pixel
The Lone Star Ranger [DVD]
The Lone Star Ranger [DVD]
Dvd ~ David Carradine
Price: £4.55

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Appalling, ludicrous and cretinous, 8 July 2014
This review is from: The Lone Star Ranger [DVD] (DVD)
Quite, no what am I saying, utterly dreadful at every level. Acting appalling, plot ludicrous even the weaponry is cretinous. Avoid this film at all costs if you are a western buff. It is an abhorrence, and that's me being kind to it


The Ghost Hunters
The Ghost Hunters
Price: £4.74

8 of 11 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars very weak, 5 Jun. 2014
This review is from: The Ghost Hunters (Kindle Edition)
Full of sloppy errors-supposedly written in 1920's-we have "video tape, lock down, hot line" etc all from decades later and unknown to the narrator or protagonists. Easy read for a train journey but did anyone proof read for this. Also a male writing from the female's mind set of a woman of middle classes in 1920's. She is an ex-glamour model but all her friend and family are fine with this. It was so common place and mundane in the 1920's that no-one even bats an eye and takes it for normal-for goodness sake-where is the period mind set! This is pre-abdication in terms of censorious views.Also he writes from the female perspective in a cringing style and tone.It will make an ideal television adaptation, and that is not a praiseworthy observation.
Comment Comment (1) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Jun 10, 2014 8:50 AM BST


The Scarlet Thief (Jack Lark)
The Scarlet Thief (Jack Lark)
by Paul Fraser Collard
Edition: Paperback
Price: £6.39

2 of 4 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Silly but just about readable, 22 May 2014
You are asked to believe a working class man with limited experience as a soldier in a peacetime regiment can masquerade as an officer with martial prowls and skill. He can blend in with educated, wealthy officers and no-one is the wiser, they do not notice what would have been glaring gaps in his knowledge, education, social skills, vocabulary or accent. This is in a Victorian hierarchical military society with rigid barriers and class issues. Leave logic and credulity to one side and it wiles away a train journey, made more palatable for me that I bought it in an Oxfam shop. the book ends with the same character about to repeat the same ruse as an imposter in India, as they are just as likely to be as dim as the other officers but in another setting.Future books will have him as a Confederate officer with a cockney accent that no-one notices, a Prussian cavalry officer with a love of jellied eels that is the norm and a Zulu warrior with a knowledge of real ale.


Rome: The Art of War (Rome 4)
Rome: The Art of War (Rome 4)
by M C Scott
Edition: Hardcover
Price: £8.52

3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great book, libellous marketing, 25 Oct. 2013
As with the others in this series, this is a well written, well researched and excellent novel with three dimensional characters and a well structured and convincing plot. To market it "as good as Conn Iggulden", is a libel to the writer M C Scott. The only appropriate way to compare it to Conn Iggulden is, "infinity superior and better in every way than Conn Iggulden" or "not as badly written, sloppily researched or juvenile as Conn Iggulden". My career in book advertising and marketing lies ahead of me.


Winner Takes All: A Life of Sorts
Winner Takes All: A Life of Sorts
by Michael Winner
Edition: Paperback
Price: £7.19

3 of 6 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Self elusional twaddle, 6 Dec. 2009
Quite awful, as an autobiography goes. One sided quotes from critics on his films. Never one to lapse into self delusion Michael Winner air brushes the dire views of critics from his book and so, from his perception of the world view of his works. I enjoyed some of his films, in particular his westerns, greatly -so I would not want to be viewed as a critic of his work based on his personality. A poorly written book that makes you squirm with his self conscious name dropping - if they are important they are his very great friends -honestly....And never mind Death Wish 2 - so bad it makes you want to scream with rage at a film so stupid in every way and then there is Death Wish 3 - that makes it look like Citizen Kane in comparison.


Vlad Dracula: The Dragon Prince
Vlad Dracula: The Dragon Prince
by Michael Augustyn
Edition: Paperback

9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Dracula as a character in a true setting, 20 Jun. 2009
This is an excellent read about a very complex part of the renaissance period of history. Dracula is presented as a three dimensional character with no revisionist historical perspective. His brutality is shown as having a political motivation and in keeping with the cruelty of the period. There is a slightly jarring final aspect of a supernatural nature, but this was inevitable considering the Bram Stoker inspired view of Dracula. The military history from the siege of Constantinople to the evolution of cannon in warfare is very well researched and explained. A good read and recommended to all.


The Gates of the Alamo: A Novel
The Gates of the Alamo: A Novel
by Stephen Harrigan
Edition: Hardcover

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A great book to treasure, 14 April 2009
This is a wonderful book. I naively thought the story of the Alamo was quiet well known to me, but this book taught me loads. The small details of the lives of participants on both sides of this conflict are fascinating and humbling. The actual historical characters are shown in three dimensional forms from their strengths to their flaws, making them more human and believable, and if that just redress the John Wayne version of the story it will have earned a place on the shelves of anyone interested in the Alamo story. The relationship between the botanist and the inn keeper is moving and elegant, the loss of opportunity presented by life and the sadness of regret. A book that can be re-read and treasured


Flint and Silver
Flint and Silver
by John Drake
Edition: Hardcover

2 of 4 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Quite awful, 1 Feb. 2009
This review is from: Flint and Silver (Hardcover)
This is very poor. The novel "Treasure Island" starts from a point where all the crew of Flint and the treasure is positioned for a wonderful discovery of motive and realisation. This weedy prosaic nonsense gives background and characterisation which is at best unnecessary and at worst, one dimensional nonsense. The character of Silver bares no relation to the original and his motivation is laughable. Flint is a cardboard cut out psycho with no charm or balance. Yes, I do realise pirates were not all from Disney- lovable- cliché - stock - plc

If "Treasure Island" was the feast that started the process, this book is the biological after effect which would sadly follow. There is talk of a sequel -that would be akin to a purge. If you want a great book that follows the same theme, and strangely and unaccountably not mentioned in the edition I had, read "The Adventures of Ben Gunn" by R F Delderfield - great affection for the source material and beautifully written.


Tehano: A Novel
Tehano: A Novel
by Allen Wier
Edition: Hardcover
Price: £22.61

5.0 out of 5 stars A western for grown ups, 16 Mar. 2008
This review is from: Tehano: A Novel (Hardcover)
This is a stunningly good book. The characters have the values and believes of the period and still resonate with a 21st century reader. The details of life in the period are vivid and fascinating. The narrative is from several protagonists viewpoint and that has the value of involving you in different perspectives of the cultural diversity of American, Comanche etc. This is a novel for grown ups who are fascinated with the history of the west but don't want a childlike fantasy version as is so often the case in the western novel. I rate it with Lonesome Dove as a quality read


How to be a Complete and Utter Failure in Life, Work and Everything: 44 1/2 Steps to Lasting Underachievement
How to be a Complete and Utter Failure in Life, Work and Everything: 44 1/2 Steps to Lasting Underachievement
by Steve McDermott
Edition: Paperback
Price: £8.79

1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A first class experince which can change your take on life, 7 Sept. 2007
I have worked in training and assessment for the last 17 years, this book gives you so much you can use in this arena of work. The work on goal setting alone is great for managers and time management issues. I have quoted from it constantly and reflected on it, as I re-read it every few years.

Steve's style is clever and accessible with good quotes and anecdotal stories to fix the learning points. The CD is a good introduction to the reverse psychology of attaining failure status. After becoming acquainted with these techniques you will start to notice how many people achieve failure, while some have it pushed upon them, mostly by their own efforts.

A top read for everyone


Page: 1 | 2