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Eyewall
Eyewall
Price: £3.09

1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A solid beach read, 6 July 2011
This review is from: Eyewall (Kindle Edition)
A very enjoyable beach read. This isn't great literature, and the plot is rather predictable, but it is a nice way to spend a little escape time. The main characters are nicely rounded (though again, a bit predictable) and you truly care what happens to them. There is some interesting meteorology information, but I would have enjoyed a little more education in this respect (something along the lines of a chapter such as found in "A Perfect Storm").

Engaging, if predictable.


The End of Marking Time
The End of Marking Time
Price: £1.18

5.0 out of 5 stars Unique and Well Written, 22 Jun. 2011
As others have said, a fascinating and well written take on big brother style society. The protagonist, though an unrepentant house-breaker and thief, is very sympathetic. I wanted him to succeed at his re-education, but could understand how confusing it would be change his whole worldview in a limited time. Lots of interesting moral and ethical dilemmas here, and not a lot of easy answers. An interesting, well written book that made me care and think.


Eye of the God
Eye of the God

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great for a Holiday!, 17 Jun. 2011
This review is from: Eye of the God (Kindle Edition)
This was a fun and engrossing read. The characters were highly believable, and the story took a number of twists I had not anticipated. While Abington Press is a Christian publisher, the story is not overtly religious and can be enjoyed by both believers and non-believers alike. Not great literature but a real page turner with some unique elements.


The Darkness of Bones
The Darkness of Bones

5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Couldn't get started., 16 Jun. 2011
Warning: I have not finished this novel. I began reading this novel sitting at the NHS emerg on a Friday night. Lots of people before me, nothing else to do, desperate for some entertainment to take my mind off the situation. This wasn't it. I only read the first few chapters and couldn't stand it any longer. I got up and read the menengitis and STD posters instead.

The simple fact was that after a few chapters I had not encountered one likeable character. I agree with Elizabeth George, who argues that character is the foundation of a story. We, as readers, have to care about what happens to the characters before we will buy into any premise. In this novel, each character introduced made me shudder, and I just couldn't be bothered to continue reading. I have better things to do with my time. Apologies to the author if the characters become more likeable later on.


One True Love
One True Love
Price: £2.99

11 of 11 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Well Written, Too Much Kissing!, 12 Jun. 2011
This review is from: One True Love (Kindle Edition)
I quite enjoyed this book, particularly the maternal aspects of it. Both Lisa and Maggie seemed very real to me, perhaps because I'm in the middle of toddlerdom right now. Both of these characters grabbed my heart and made me want to find out what happens to them, a sure sign of well-written characters. However, some of the supporting characters, such as Lisa's fiance, were less believable and could have used more fleshing out.

Of course, the storyline is a bit happily-ever-after, but as this is the point of this type of book, it seems a bit churlish to fault it.

The one thing that really got on my nerves, however, was Nick and his kissing. Goodness sakes! You're furious at the woman who walked out on you, and you keep giving her these jaw-dropping, knee-weakening kisses. Why? Sexual attraction and tension I understand, but Nick was certainly over the top, almost schizophrenic at times.

A fun beach read, with well-developed main characters and an interesting, if predictable, plot.


Germs, Genes, & Civilization: How Epidemics Shaped Who We Are Today (FT Press Science)
Germs, Genes, & Civilization: How Epidemics Shaped Who We Are Today (FT Press Science)
Price: £15.19

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Interesting Read Lacking References, 4 Jun. 2011
Similar in type to William McNeill's Plagues and Peoples (a far superior effort and highly recomended!), this book considers the role infectious disease has played in the development of civilization. While I generally enjoyed this book as a light read, I was disappointed in three key aspects. First, and most seriously, the author makes a number of contentions which he fails to support with evidence or references. In fact, at no point in this book does he note from where he has gotten his information. (As his instructor, I would hand this back to him and request he provide references before submitting.) His extrapolations and suppositions therefore lack any sort of solid basis on which to stand. Second, he covers too much ground to convincingly support each of his contentions. In the space of eleven chapters he discusses numerous diseases (bacterial, viral and protazoan), numerous time periods (neolithic, ancient, medival, early modern, modern) and various geographic locations (Europe, Asia, Americas, Africa). He simply can't provide enough depth in each area to produce a convincing case. Lastly, I find his style very jarring. His tone varies from highly academic to informal in the space of a sentence. Again, I would hand this back to him and ask that he use a consistent tone. He can make his writing approachable without the additional personal asides. In short, this is an interesting first draft but needs a consistent tone, to be more focused, and, most importantly, references provided.


Shrouded in Silence
Shrouded in Silence

10 of 11 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Poor Man's Da Vinci Code, 18 May 2011
Unlike the earlier reviewer, I enjoy Christian fiction and am pleased to find it free for Kindle now and then. However, what I do not enjoy is poorly written literature, whatever the genre or faith. This book is just terrible. The characters are painfully one-dimensional. Not once could I envision any of them as a real person. The dialogue is completely unbelievable. The author keeps setting up discussions to educate the reader that would NEVER occur between real bibilical scholars; the words he puts in their mouths make them look trite and, quite frankly, stupid. The story itself doesn't make much sense. The scholars themselves never actually do any scholarship that helps them find the document; the person who knows where it is just turns up on their doorstep and gives them the answer.

All in all, this book is a waste of time, not because it is Christian fiction, but because it is badly written fiction. Check out Riven (Jerry Jenkins) for a fabulous Christian read.


My Little Library Bible Stories (Candle Library)
My Little Library Bible Stories (Candle Library)
by Karen Williamson
Edition: Board book
Price: £3.99

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Rather Disappointed, 11 May 2011
I purchased these for my 1 yr old to take on a trip. While the size is perfect for airport carry-on luggage, the illustrations are overly stylised and don't hold my daughter's interest. Further, I'm a little concerned that the stories have been simplified to the point where they are missing very important lessons. For example, in the story of the loaves and the fishes, the book doesn't mention that Jesus prayed before he handed out the food. It seems to be losing the connection to God. And in the story of the Prodigal Son, the book states only that the younger son leaves home. Consequently, it makes no sense when he returns and apologies. What for? Of course these stories need to be simple for little ones, but not at the expense of losing narrative coherence or key spiritual values.


Don't Make Me Come Up There: Quiet Moments for Busy Moms
Don't Make Me Come Up There: Quiet Moments for Busy Moms
by Kristen Welch
Edition: Paperback
Price: £9.63

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Smile in my Day, 10 May 2011
A lovely little book with short chapters, perfect for that quick cup of tea when the little one has decided that napping isn't the worst thing in the world. Like other mothers, I get overwhelmed and exhausted and tend to lose perspective, especially when the homemade lunch hits the wall! It is easy to forget that God is there and I can lean on him for wisdom (and energy). This book is a lovely reminder of this. Well worth picking up if you are a mother in need of a little peace and encouragement.


Secrets of the Tudor Court
Secrets of the Tudor Court

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Re-review, 7 May 2011
Apologies. I wrote a thoughtful review of this a few days ago and it hasn't turned up. (Perhaps I violated one of Amazon's rules re reviews.) Anyway, here is a quick summary of my thoughts. Basically, an interesting take on the Tudor saga, marred by poor characterisation and dialogue. Mary was painfully naive and didn't develop, and her father as the villian had no redeeming qualities. A fine beach read but not much more.


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