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Sofia Romualdo (Porto, Portugal)

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Fly London Women's Lonni Green/Black Mary Janes P142201001 3 UK
Fly London Women's Lonni Green/Black Mary Janes P142201001 3 UK

5.0 out of 5 stars Gorgeous and confortable, 29 July 2012
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I got the green / black version of these and they're absolutely gorgeous. Quite confortable as well - the heel is not very high and the leather is soft. Recommended!


Madame Xanadu: Disenchanted v. 1
Madame Xanadu: Disenchanted v. 1
by Matt Wagner
Edition: Paperback

3.0 out of 5 stars Lovely artwork, story could be better, 16 Aug 2011
First off, lovely artwork from Amy Reeder Hadley - it makes the book worth looking into. The story was interesting, but felt a little repetitive, and Madame Xanadu, as a character, fell a little short of my expectations. She had the potential to be a lot more interesting, not to mention likable. Instead, she comes off a little too immature and naive for a thousand year-old immortal. The Phantom Stranger was simply annoying and had a serious lack of communication skills, but then again, I've never been a fan of these brooding, mysterious character types. Still, it was nice reading about how the story of Madame Xanadu (or Nimue) entangled with the stories of other DC characters, as well as with historical events such as the French revolution.

Looking forward to the next volume.


How to Get a Job in a Museum or Art Gallery
How to Get a Job in a Museum or Art Gallery
by Alison Baverstock
Edition: Paperback
Price: £9.80

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Extremely helpful and practical, 8 Aug 2011
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A thorough and sobering look at the business of museums and galleries and what it is really like working in this field. It can be hard to plan a career in the art world because nobody seems to have followed the same route to where they are, which might erroneously lead one to think that everything depends on luck. So it's refreshing to read a practical study, with interviews and case studies from people in the field.

The only negative point is that it's very UK centric, but I guess that's to be expected. All in all, a very useful read, highly recommended if you're starting out.


The Locals' Guide to Edinburgh
The Locals' Guide to Edinburgh
by Owen O'Leary
Edition: Paperback
Price: £7.85

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Edinburgh beyond the obvious, 26 July 2011
This month, I went to Scotland for the first time. I was only there for a week, but in all honesty, if I could I wouldn't have left. I've traveled to many places in the world but this is the first time I've felt so strongly about a place. Edinburgh is the city of my dreams. I heartily recommend going there to everyone, no matter where you're from.

Since I prefer to visit places by exploring and meeting locals rather than following tourist routes, I went into a book store searching for a different kind of guide. I'm really glad I found this one. It's a beautifully designed book written by people who live in the city, and features recommendations that go far beyond the obvious. It's made me want to go back even more, and I actually didn't want this book to end, because delving into it felt like being back in the city.

Highly recommended!


Exhibition Design (Portfolio)
Exhibition Design (Portfolio)
by Philip Hughes
Edition: Paperback
Price: £19.13

1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Good introduction, lacking in some areas, 14 July 2011
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This book aims to be a thorough guide to the principles of exhibition designing, from trade fairs to museums and galleries.

While it touches upon many interesting themes, I felt that it was lacking in several areas - the information is a bit disorganized and for the most part it doesn't go into detail about the things that are being explained. A lot of the schematics, while visually impressive, lacked explanations and context, and most of the times the labels were so small they were unreadable. But the biggest problem I had with the book is that it makes no apparent separation between trade / commercial exhibitions and art exhibitions. Say what you will, I'm not so cynical as to think that what you're hoping to reach with an art exhibition in a museum is the same as from a trade fair exhibition where you sell products.

Still, this was fairly useful as an introduction to the theme.


Free: How today's smartest businesses profit by giving something for nothing
Free: How today's smartest businesses profit by giving something for nothing
by Chris Anderson
Edition: Paperback
Price: £6.74

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Decent book, a bit one-sided, 15 Jun 2011
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I bought this book hoping it would help me understand a little better the economics of the internet world. There's no doubt that the internet was built around the concept of Free, but like with every other topic I'm interested in, I missed reading a systematic study about what (if anything) had changed, and how. This book does a decent job at it, but it wasn't perfect.

It gives a historical account of Free, the different meanings it can have, and how people react to it. It goes into the web world and those that have benefited from it, and those who have not, and why. It starts off well, but after a while, I felt like I was reading the same thing over and over again. It gets better again towards the end, but I struggled to keep going in the middle since not much was being added to the discussion.

At times this felt very much like a one-sided account. The book touched upon the negative consequences of free but largely dismissed them in the grand scheme of things, and I wasn't convinced it was actually that simple. Still, a decent book on the topic.


Sandman Dustcovers 1989-1997 TP
Sandman Dustcovers 1989-1997 TP
by Dave McKean
Edition: Paperback
Price: £18.99

5.0 out of 5 stars Gorgeous cover art from Dave McKean, 15 Jun 2011
A book about the wonderful work of Dave McKean for the Sandman comics. If you love Dave McKean's artwork you will love this book. Each cover has a story, and all the little details will have you stare at the images for a long time. It's interesting to see how his work evolved over the years, and the commentary from both the artist and Neil Gaiman (who also wrote a short story for the book) is funny and insightful.

Definitely worth it if you're a Sandman fan. If you're not, I'm sure you'll be interested in checking it out after you read this book.


Life Of Pi
Life Of Pi
by Yann Martel
Edition: Paperback
Price: £7.19

3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A boy and a tiger, 25 May 2011
This review is from: Life Of Pi (Paperback)
After reading this I realized one thing. It is much easier to write a review about a book you didn't like than about one that deeply touched you.

For once I'm not going to describe the plot, since I can't think of a way to do it without over simplifying it (a boy who survives a shipwreck only to be trapped in a raft, in the middle of the ocean, with a tiger, just doesn't cut it). Suffice to say that "Life of Pi" may not be for everyone - it's not, after all, just a simple story, and at times it's closer to philosophy than fiction - but in the right state of mind, it can be breathtaking. It certainly was for me.

This book is about transformation, faith, humanity, survival. The writing is beautiful, equal parts crude and delicate. I honestly can't think of anything else to say other than "read with an open mind". Highly recommended.


The Walking Dead Book 1: Bk. 1 (Walking Dead (12 Stories))
The Walking Dead Book 1: Bk. 1 (Walking Dead (12 Stories))
by Tony Moore
Edition: Hardcover
Price: £17.67

1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Good, has potential to get better, 9 May 2011
After all the hype surrounding this series, I came to it with my expectations maybe a bit too high. Post-apocalyptic stories about zombies have been done before, so I wasn't expecting an incredibly original story, but I was hoping for some good character development and a solid storyline.

Did this book have it? Yes, though not as much as it could. The story starts a bit too suddenly and the characters aren't easy to connect with. The women were mostly pitiful and weak and the men all seemed to go crazy (there were a few exceptions, mostly with secondary characters though). However, as a survival story, this is pretty accurate in that most of the time is spent looking for basic needs, like food and shelter. The story is fairly interesting, and it gets better in the second chapter, but I still think it has room to get better. I'll be checking out the rest of the series, but I really hope the characters grow up a little.
Comment Comment (1) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Mar 14, 2012 11:38 PM GMT


Whoops!: Why everyone owes everyone and no one can pay
Whoops!: Why everyone owes everyone and no one can pay
by John Lanchester
Edition: Paperback
Price: £7.49

10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The crisis for the non-economically savvy, 29 April 2011
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Like a lot of people in the world today, I've been struggling for a while to truly understand just how things got to be the way they are right now. Even with everyone and their uncle talking about the crisis, most of what is said concentrates on throwing accusations to one another, and I've missed seeing a systematic, organized account of what went on.

I admit, I'm not the most economically savvy person - my education has been focused primarily in the natural sciences and art. But I like to have basic knowledge of pretty much everything (not the healthiest of habits, I know) and not understanding the economic principles behind the crisis upset me, which is why I read this.

This book might just be the most important book I've read so far, this year. It's a great introduction for those who, like me, don't necessarily understand derivatives, credit default swaps, securitization, or how bail outs work. Beware though, this is not for the faint of heart - it's not easy to wrap your head around the sheer craziness of the financial systems, and the unfairness of it all is even harder to accept.

My country is now in the middle of this whole economic shenanigan. A lot of the things in this book, being mostly US and UK-centric, don't apply to us, and our situation can't be explained only by the financial system (our political system and non-sustainable spending played a big part too), but it's not hard to see that most of what went on globally is a direct consequence of the financial system's irresponsibility. It's not hard to see that, after the housing and personal credit bubbles burst and financial institutions no longer had that source of high-risk, high-interest rates income, they had to find something else to milk for money. That something, it turns out, is entire countries. And the infamous rating agencies, the central banks, the IMF, they're all part of a broken system that results solely in putting money in the hands of the people who need it the least.

I only wish that more people would read things like this to truly understand what went on. After all, a big part of the problem is that most people had no idea of what was going in. Instead, I suspect most people just won't find the attention span needed, and will just keep on looking for someone else to blame, not to mention keep on being more concerned with money than with value. That's human nature for you.


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