Profile for Roman Clodia > Reviews

Personal Profile

Content by Roman Clodia
Top Reviewer Ranking: 53
Helpful Votes: 12036

Learn more about Your Profile.

Reviews Written by
Roman Clodia (London)
(TOP 100 REVIEWER)   

Show:  
Page: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11-20
pixel
Titus Andronicus: The Oxford Shakespeare (Oxford World's Classics)
Titus Andronicus: The Oxford Shakespeare (Oxford World's Classics)
by William Shakespeare
Edition: Paperback
Price: 6.39

4.0 out of 5 stars Gleefully and exuberantly bloody, 15 Sep 2014
Gleefully and exuberantly bloody, this is a play awash in severed limbs, gore and body parts. Taking its cue from the huge popularity of revenge drama which left the stage strewn with dead bodies, as well as from Ovid and Seneca both famous for their own macabre stories of bodily disintegration and fragmentation, this is Shakespeare's attempt to challenge what revenge plays might do. Most crucially, deaths and representations of tortured bodies take place not offstage via messenger speeches but in front of our eyes.

Dismissed from the mid-seventeenth century onwards, this play has become popular all over again for its visceral engagements with violence, with torture, and with ideas of what it means to be 'barbaric' or 'civilised' - themes that have a pressing relevancy again for our post-genocide world.

The introduction contextualises the play well, and the commentary and notes elucidate what the language is doing. This is an excellent edition for students or general readers wanting a deeper insight into this excessively violent and gory play.


The Comedy of Errors: The Oxford Shakespeare (Oxford World's Classics)
The Comedy of Errors: The Oxford Shakespeare (Oxford World's Classics)
by William Shakespeare
Edition: Paperback
Price: 5.59

4.0 out of 5 stars A good introduction complicates the meaning of this play beyond mere farce, 15 Sep 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This is one of those plays which tends to be regarded by audiences and directors alike as being nothing more than a farcical romp as two pairs of twins are repeatedly confused to create chaos on stage. There are, though, deeper implications to the action and the introduction here moves some way towards elucidating some of the contexts and thematic issues which are at stake in the play.

The drama is darkly framed by the possible execution of Egeon, and the problems of identity put all kinds of relationships at risk: marriage, the family, mercantile relations, masters and servants - all the orthodox ways in which early modern society was bound.

So this is a very good edition if you're studying the play or simply want a more complicated way of understanding it - modern ideas of the doppelganger, or even popular comedies like Sliding Doors have more in common with this play that we might at first think.

Like the other Oxford single play texts, this draws on the textual scholarship of the Complete Oxford but with extended commentary and notes which make it particularly useful for students.


OZ Naturals - THE BEST Hyaluronic Acid Serum For Skin - Clinical Strength Anti Aging Serum - Best Anti Wrinkle Serum With Vitamin C + Vitamin E - Our Customers Call It A Facelift In A Bottle. This Vegan Hyaluronic Acid Serum Will Plump & Hydrate Dull Skin As It's Designed To Fill Those Fine Lines & Wrinkles. Satisfaction 100% GUARANTEED!
OZ Naturals - THE BEST Hyaluronic Acid Serum For Skin - Clinical Strength Anti Aging Serum - Best Anti Wrinkle Serum With Vitamin C + Vitamin E - Our Customers Call It A Facelift In A Bottle. This Vegan Hyaluronic Acid Serum Will Plump & Hydrate Dull Skin As It's Designed To Fill Those Fine Lines & Wrinkles. Satisfaction 100% GUARANTEED!
Offered by OZ Naturals EU
Price: 11.49

4.0 out of 5 stars Smoothes skin and diminishes pores, 15 Sep 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
I've always looked after my skin and was already using a serum (L'Oreal Youth Code) before trying this: after 2 weeks my skin is noticeably smoother and my pores have become almost invisible - result!

I don't have wrinkles (yet!) so I'm hoping this will work as a preventative. As with any product, the less care you've taken of your skin in the past, the greater the impact will be - for me, it's not revelatory but is noticeable.

The serum itself is quite viscous but spreads easily and disappears into my skin - it needs to be followed up by a good moisturiser as this is a carrier for moisure rather than a moisturiser in itself.

I love the packaging which feels professional and also allows you to control exactly how much of the serum is dispensed. I'm using this at night only under a night cream and am very happy with the results to date. If this suits your skin then this is an excellent product at this price point.

(I received a complimentary sample for review purposes)


Gutenberg's Apprentice
Gutenberg's Apprentice

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Gutenberg and the start of the print trade in Europe, 14 Sep 2014
This review is from: Gutenberg's Apprentice (Hardcover)
This is a novelisation of Johann Gutenberg and his revolutionary moveable type printing press which kick-started the printed book trade in mid-fifteenth century Europe. Christie is herself a printer and the stand-out parts of this book are when she is writing about the technical challenges of printing: creating the alloy for the stamps, carving the letters and creating what we know as fonts, getting the ink right. The excitement of the process and the innovation of the first books are conveyed excellently.

Less successful are the ‘novel’ parts of the book: apart from the mercurial, irascible Gutenberg, the other characters are coloured dimly, and there is perhaps too much flitting between the print story and the political and religious context – Christie isn’t a confident enough novelist yet to know what to put in, what to leave out, and how to convey the necessary history with a light touch.

I sometimes work with sixteenth-century books and so, almost inevitably, loved the detailed emphasis on printing itself and what it meant. The book is a bit clotted up with a lot of other stories as if it’s not possible to have a novel without a love story in there somewhere which served to detract from the heart of the book – but the story of Gutenberg, his visionary press, and the start of the commercial book trade is so well conveyed that I can forgive the first-time-novelist flaws.

(This review is from an ARC courtesy of the publisher)


Day 21 (100)
Day 21 (100)
by Kass Morgan
Edition: Hardcover

4.0 out of 5 stars Well-paced sequel, 14 Sep 2014
This review is from: Day 21 (100) (Hardcover)
This sequel to The 100 twists and turns, and keeps up the pace of intrigue and secrets. Following the same characters as the first book, Bellamy, Clarke and Wells face danger on Earth while, back in space, Glass and Luke have crucial decisions to make.

There are some moments where events are a little too convenient or just emotionally opaque (Luke at the end, for example) but this isn’t a series that deals in the deep and meaningful. It’s best to switch off your more critical faculties and just enjoy this as a gripping story.

(This review is from an ARC courtesy of the publisher)


Pride and Prejudice: (Dramatisation)
Pride and Prejudice: (Dramatisation)
by Jane Austen
Edition: Audio CD
Price: 16.50

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars (3.5 stars) A 3-hour radio play based on Pride & Prejudice, 13 Sep 2014
Customer review from the Amazon Vine Programme (What's this?)
(3.5 stars)

This is a 3-hour dramatisation of P&P not a reading of the novel: so think of it as a radio play based on the book and you'll have a good idea of what you're getting here.

I'm not sure how comprehensible this would be to anyone unfamiliar with the original since the connecting narration is quite skimpy and assumes that listeners will already have read the book and understands who's who, and their social situations. This also, of course, means that much of Austen's caustic and bracing commentary is lost: the famous opening lines ('It is a truth universally acknowledged that a single man in possession of a good fortune must be in want of a wife') are shoe-horned in after the opening scene in the Bennet's household, but some of the irony that Austen wields so well is lacking. It's a double shame since Amanda Root's narration when it's there is excellent, and she has a lovely feel for the text bringing out its satire in a subtle fashion.

As well as cutting great swathes of Austen, more controversially this inserts speeches and settings: so we actually hear Mr and Mrs Bennet settling into their creaking bed together (Austen would have been horrified!), and have inserted speeches where Mrs B is abominably rude to Darcy directly to his face at the dinner at Sir William Lucas' house, and new simpering speeches between Jane and Bingley when they first meet which renders them both far less attractive and really a bit silly.

Despite my criticisms it's hard not to enjoy this if you're an Austen fan: I would suggest, though, that if you haven't read the book (or seen what has become the definitive TV version with Ehle/Firth) then this isn't a good place to start - 3.5 stars for being pleasantly entertaining but not doing justice to Austen.
Comment Comments (4) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Sep 15, 2014 8:21 AM BST


The Body Embarrassed: Drama and the Disciplines of Shame in Early Modern England
The Body Embarrassed: Drama and the Disciplines of Shame in Early Modern England
by Gail Kern Paster
Edition: Paperback
Price: 15.95

4.0 out of 5 stars The complex discourses surrounding 'leaky' female bodies, 12 Sep 2014
Paster adds to the debates and dialogues about the constructions of the early modern body by focusing on humoral theory and the female body as represented on stage. As a Shakespearean, she perhaps draws too many examples from a set canon of plays and I would have liked to see her branch out a little. Nevertheless, this is an interesting discussion about how the body – especially, Paster argues – the female body is conceived and perceived of as a leaky and embarrassingly fluid vessel.

This is a scholarly book and isn’t aimed at a general or populist audience: and is best read against Bakhtin, Sawday, Foucault et al. Good for older undergraduates and anyone else interested in the complexities of the early modern body.


Bring Your Lunch: Quick and Tasty Wallet-Friendly Lunches for Grown-Ups
Bring Your Lunch: Quick and Tasty Wallet-Friendly Lunches for Grown-Ups
Price: 3.29

4.0 out of 5 stars Good for lunch-box novices, 12 Sep 2014
This seems to be aimed at lunch-box novices so is helpful if you’ve just started taking your lunch to work. There are some good introductory sections at the beginning on finding the right containers etc. though it’s aimed at the US market and not all brands are available in the UK.

There are too many sandwiches for me but the sections on soups and salads have some nice ideas. There is also a page of ideas for throwing together something for lunch when you haven’t planned or shopped, and some strategies of how to use up leftovers.

What I’d really like to see is more ‘emergency’ lunches: i.e. what to do when you get in late after a night out, and only have five minutes to create a lunch before falling into bed – and have no time whatsoever the next morning to do more than grab your lunch-box from the fridge and rush out the door. Yes, in an ideal world we’d all have planned, shopped, chopped, bagged, prepared and frozen ahead of time but in my actual life all that’s a rarity rather than the norm.

So some good ideas for brightening up your lunch, but this is aimed at people who are generally more organised and plan-ahead than I am.

(I received a review copy of this book via Netgalley)


Lenovo G50-70 15.6-inch Laptop (Black) - (Intel Core i5-4210U 1.7 GHz, 8 GB RAM, 2 GB Dedicated Graphics, 1 TB HDD, DVDRW, HDMI, Webcam, Bluetooth, Wi-Fi, Windows 8.1)
Lenovo G50-70 15.6-inch Laptop (Black) - (Intel Core i5-4210U 1.7 GHz, 8 GB RAM, 2 GB Dedicated Graphics, 1 TB HDD, DVDRW, HDMI, Webcam, Bluetooth, Wi-Fi, Windows 8.1)
Price: 499.99

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Fast and efficient with a sleek and elegant look, 12 Sep 2014
Customer review from the Amazon Vine Programme (What's this?)
This is an excellent laptop with sleek looks. It connects to wi-fi more or less instantly, and does everything I need fast and seamlessly. I don't play games and use this for mainly writing and web-based research plus the usual browsing, shopping, iplayer etc.

It comes pre-loaded with a lot of proprietary software so you may need to tidy up your desktop a bit. It also has a pre-loaded McAfee month's trial which means that you're protected immediately, useful as you need to be connected to the web to complete the set-up.

The screen is noticeably cleaner, brighter and crisper than my old laptop (a four year old Toshiba Satellite), and the audio is good though I tend to listen via earphones rather than through the speakers. This runs very quietly with an almost silent fan, and hardly heats up at all so you could actually use it on your lap should you want to.

I write a lot for my job and it took me a day or so to get used to the keyboard: the tiles are slightly smaller than I'm used to and don't click down much, but having worked on this for seven hours today I've adjusted with no problem. The touchpad was a bit scratchy when new but has also settled down.

Portability is a relative thing: for me, at 2.5 kg and with a casing which makes this larger than my old 15.6-inch display, this comes up too big and heavy for me to regularly carry around when out but someone bigger or stronger may disagree.

So all together this is a excellent mid-price, stay-at-home laptop: fast, efficient, quiet, solid but elegant.


Twist
Twist
by Tom Grass
Edition: Paperback
Price: 11.27

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Oliver Twist meets Mission Impossible, 11 Sep 2014
This review is from: Twist (Paperback)
Customer review from the Amazon Vine Programme (What's this?)
The Twist of the title refers to both this book's re-writing of Dickens' Oliver Twist and the way that story is twisted in this modern re-imagining.

Set firmly in the present moment, Twist is an 18 year old street artist who's skipped probation and gets drawn by Dodge into Fagin's gang of art thieves. What ensues is a high octane heist reminiscent of so many films with the accoutrements of the Mission Impossible franchise: masked raiders, rooftop acrobatics, technological devices which fail at the last minute, car chases, and lift-shaft scenes.

The book frequently reads like a film script ('he made eye contact with the driver of an oncoming lorry, forcing the Vespa behind him to skid, swerve and come slewing up at him forcing Twist to leapfrog a traffic bollard, then roll across the bonnet of a stationary Saab and hit the pavement on the far side, somehow on his feet') and is fast-paced and fun.

Grass makes good use of the complicated status of East London: part hip Hoxton, part deprived East End, a nod to the more extended social commentary of Dickens' tale. Ultimately, this may lack some literary finesse but is a slick piece of entertainment.


Page: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11-20