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The Eye of the Dragon (Golden Dragon Fantasy Gamebooks)
The Eye of the Dragon (Golden Dragon Fantasy Gamebooks)
by Dave Morris
Edition: Paperback

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A well structured and entertaining adventure, 23 Feb 2014
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‘Eye of the Dragon’ sends the reader on a quest into the waterlogged ruins of the ancient city of Thalios to rescue an eminent scholar and retrieve the eponymous Eye, a magical object of myth. As such the adventure is almost divided into two quests, albeit obviously related. The majority of the adventure involves exploring the ruins of this once great civilisation in an effort to find Master Giru and his archaeological expedition. Once you’ve found him the much shorter quest for the Eye begins. But the monstrous Kappa are also searching for it.

The locale for this adventure is an ancient Greek type environment. Surprisingly it is not a environment that occurs that often in adventure gamebooks (of course there is the Cretan Chronicles). The sunken ruins are clearly inspired by a mix Atlantean mythology and the eruption of Thera that devastated Minoan civilisation. The ruined city of Thalios has been clearly envisioned by the authors and adds a lot to the atmosphere of the adventure.

Unlike other Golden Dragon gamebooks, the reader plays a sorcerer and thus begins their quest with a fair selection of spells already at their disposal. You begin with twelve spells which cover quite a variety. They are split into combat style ones and spells that give you a particular ability to achieve a task. The Burning Tiger spell is quite imaginative and the Séance spell which enables the adventurer to commune with the recent and long dead (a type of magic/necromancy that surprisingly doesn’t come up that often in adventure gamebooks) adds an intriguing dimension to the adventure. However, the magic system is set up so that each spell going only be used once for each read through. In a way this makes them similar to some items/equipment and the reader needs to pace themselves carefully. Magic needs to be used with discretion throughout the adventure.

The enemy mainly to be encountered are the forces of Kappa, a strange amphibian like species made of coral, which roam the ruins of Thalios searching for the Eye. They’re a fairly original creature; a bit different from other species to be found in gamebooks. The reader will have to face them several times during the course of the adventure and during these encounters more is revealed about them. Even so, there is a sense that more could be made of this intriguing species than just what appears in this book.

There is a good variety of other opponents to be faced though which should challenge the reader. Not all of which can be overcome with a sword and there are a fair few opponents of a magical nature. In fact, this adventure has a very well balanced mix between using combat skill, magic and wits.

There are essentially two plausible routes you can take through the ruined city which will gain you the information and items you will need to succeed. These routes overlap with themselves and others so taking the most sensible or logical route is not beneficial. Backtracking is required. This makes the basic map in the front of the book a little misleading but creates the impression of an open plan environment rather than following linear paths. The convoluted order to how the reader must do things is what gives the book its difficulty. Without this quite challenging aspect the book would be a lot simpler. Most of the puzzles can be solved relatively easily and although there are a few tough opponents there is nothing particularly major and the final antagonist can be overcome without too much trouble. Choosing to do things in the right order is tricky though and this adventure will probably take a few attempts.

Challenging and atmospheric; this is, perhaps, the best of the Golden Dragon gamebooks.


Doctor Who LOGOPOLIS
Doctor Who LOGOPOLIS

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The end...but the moment has been prepared for, 22 Feb 2014
This review is from: Doctor Who LOGOPOLIS
The final adventure for the Fourth Doctor sees the Doctor attempting to fix the chameleon circuit on the Tardis. But after stealing Tremas’ body and gaining a new lease of life the Master has other plans.

‘Logopolis’ makes a marginal attempt to tie together some of the themes and plot points of the last few Fourth Doctor stories. This is a little more apparent in the novelisation than in the televised version. The reason for the existence of the CVE anomaly that took the Tardis to E-Space is explained and we learn more of the fate of Traken after the Doctor and Adric’s exit. The over-riding theme, which was loosely threaded through the previous few stories, is that of entropy, the scientific process by which order inevitably deteriorates into chaos within the universe. The theme of entropy parallels the inevitable end of the Fourth Doctor.

This is a fairly accurate novelisation by the author who wrote the original script. It is well written, if a little dry at times, and adds extra detail or explanation only where it enhances the original. There is more coverage of what happens to the Doctor when he is trapped inside the shrinking Tardis for example. In the televised version this sequence was very much from the perspective of those watching from outside. By shifting the orientation of the scene to be more from the Doctor’s perspective it serves to provide a better exploration of what is happening and to keep the Doctor at the forefront of the action.

The introduction of two new companions within the story is handled in quite a mixed way. A lot of time is devoted to Tegan becoming involved in events whereas Nyssa, admittedly introduced in the previous story but not really as a companion, seems to have been shoehorned into this story almost as an afterthought. The comparison between the two characters and the circumstances that have lead them here are subtly understated but poignant.

The planet of Logopolis is a bit hard to accept. A planet of mathematicians that somehow maintain the universe’s equilibrium against entropy is certainly an interesting concept but it is hard to imagine how such a place would exist or why, considering its apparent lack of defences, it isn’t swarming with Daleks or the like.

Despite the theme of entropy this story actually leads to re-birth and rejuvenation. By its end it paves the way to embark on a new era of Doctor Who. Both the Doctor and the Master have regenerated into seemingly younger incarnations and the Tardis practically has a new crew of three young people, two of them teenagers. ‘Logopolis’ has truly prepared for the end by embarking on a new beginning.
Comment Comment (1) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Mar 12, 2014 11:35 AM GMT


The Lord of Shadow Keep
The Lord of Shadow Keep
by Oliver Johnson
Edition: Paperback
Price: 4.99

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Solid but commonplace adventure, 22 Feb 2014
This gamebook follows the fairly standard plot of having to infiltrate the lair of an evil sorcerer/warlock/necromancer and slay him. It is probably the least original plot for a gamebook but it generally works well. ‘The Lord of Shadow Keep’ is certainly not one of the best adventures to follow this format but it adequately succeeds in the prerequisite areas and has a few novel ideas of its own thrown in.

Originally this book was devised for the Fighting Fantasy series. I can remember seeing it advertised in one of Steve Jackson’s ‘Sorcery’ books, putting it on my Christmas list and then being confused that it wasn’t the latest Fighting Fantasy adventure when I received it. I am not sure as to why it changed ranges but it worked so far as in getting my younger self to read the Golden Dragon Fantasy gamebooks. It is a little intriguing to wonder what this would have been like if it had remained part of the FF series. In reality it probably wouldn’t have been much different. The extra paragraph count might have given the story some more depth and content. But the plot line is fairly typical of a lot of FF books at the time and this adventure would have paled in comparison against the likes of ‘Citadel of Chaos’ for example. The obvious plus would have been a better combat system. The Golden Dragon system is based too much on chance and the handling of it in ‘The Lord of Shadow Keep’ is worse than how it was dealt with in the previous book in the series.

Arkayn Darkrobe, his name heavy with nominative determination, is basically what you would expect from an evil magic user. He is also a relatively easy opponent to defeat. There aren’t really any opponents that are particularly surprising or different, apart from maybe the Goldhawk (a usefull ally if you can obtain him). The treatment of ghouls and vampires is a bit different though. It is almost as if it is a look at what they do when they’re taking time off. It is subtly amusing, if at times at your expense.

It is a fairly easy gamebook and it should pose most adventurers few problems. If you’re lucky on the dice it is very possible to complete it on the first read through. There aren’t too many routes and the traps are a lot easier to avoid or overcome than they were in ‘Temple of Flame’ (the previous Golden Dragon book).

If you want a typical style adventure which is a fairly pleasant read and not too taxing this book will do the job. But if you want a challenge within the Golden Dragon range then try ‘Temple of Flame’ or ‘The Eye of the Dragon’.


The Lord of Shadow Keep (The Dragon Books)
The Lord of Shadow Keep (The Dragon Books)
by Oliver Johnson
Edition: Paperback

3.0 out of 5 stars Solid but commonplace adventure, 22 Feb 2014
This gamebook follows the fairly standard plot of having to infiltrate the lair of an evil sorcerer/warlock/necromancer and slay him. It is probably the least original plot for a gamebook but it generally works well. ‘The Lord of Shadow Keep’ is certainly not one of the best adventures to follow this format but it adequately succeeds in the prerequisite areas and has a few novel ideas of its own thrown in.

Originally this book was devised for the Fighting Fantasy series. I can remember seeing it advertised in one of Steve Jackson’s ‘Sorcery’ books, putting it on my Christmas list and then being confused that it wasn’t the latest Fighting Fantasy adventure when I received it. I am not sure as to why it changed ranges but it worked so far as in getting my younger self to read the Golden Dragon Fantasy gamebooks. It is a little intriguing to wonder what this would have been like if it had remained part of the FF series. In reality it probably wouldn’t have been much different. The extra paragraph count might have given the story some more depth and content. But the plot line is fairly typical of a lot of FF books at the time and this adventure would have paled in comparison against the likes of ‘Citadel of Chaos’ for example. The obvious plus would have been a better combat system. The Golden Dragon system is based too much on chance and the handling of it in ‘The Lord of Shadow Keep’ is worse than how it was dealt with in the previous book in the series.

Arkayn Darkrobe, his name heavy with nominative determination, is basically what you would expect from an evil magic user. He is also a relatively easy opponent to defeat. There aren’t really any opponents that are particularly surprising or different, apart from maybe the Goldhawk (a usefull ally if you can obtain him). The treatment of ghouls and vampires is a bit different though. It is almost as if it is a look at what they do when they’re taking time off. It is subtly amusing, if at times at your expense.

It is a fairly easy gamebook and it should pose most adventurers few problems. If you’re lucky on the dice it is very possible to complete it on the first read through. There aren’t too many routes and the traps are a lot easier to avoid or overcome than they were in ‘Temple of Flame’ (the previous Golden Dragon book).

If you want a typical style adventure which is a fairly pleasant read and not too taxing this book will do the job. But if you want a challenge within the Golden Dragon range then try ‘Temple of Flame’ or ‘The Eye of the Dragon’.


The Temple of Flame
The Temple of Flame
by Dave Morris
Edition: Paperback
Price: 5.20

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Explore a Mayan style temple riddled with traps, 20 Feb 2014
This review is from: The Temple of Flame (Paperback)
‘Temple of Flame’ is a substantial improvement upon the first Golden Dragon fantasy gamebook, ‘Crypt of the Vampire’. A lot more effort has gone into developing a storyline that flows through the adventure. Your rivalry with the ain antagonist, Dmontir, begins from the prologue/background and adds a whole other level to the gameplay as you race against your rival to reach the centre of the Temple of Katak and the treasure that lies within. This is not just a treasure hunt, however. Your past history with Damontir and the vents of this adventure make this more about a quest for vengeance and taking a higher moral ground.

Damontir the Mad is a very well developed villain (a vast improvement upon Lord Tenebran from ‘Crypt of the Vampire’). Because the reader is able to interact with him during the adventure it makes this gamebook different from the usual idea of just facing off against the main villain in the finale at the end of the adventure. It gives Damontir a more substantial portrayal. His Nightmare guards are also somewhat different.

As you might expect from infiltrating an ancient temple, most of the opponents to be found come in the form of guards of some description or undeads. There is enough variety, though, to keep the reader amused. You also get an entertaining, and useful, sidekick. This helps to add another dimension to the adventure and increase the reader’s immersion.

There is a firm Indiana Jones influence (who is mentioned at the start of all Golden Dragon gamebooks). Most of this comes from the variety of traps the adventurer must overcome (including the evasion of a large rock ball rolling down corridors) and the Latin American setting with a search for an ancient temple in a tropical jungle. Quite clearly the Anku is based upon Mayan civilisation but there is also influence from other pre-European American cultures and some from South East Asia. The temple on the cover is ostensibly Mayan but the actual picture of the temple in the book appears architecturally to be more Toltec; looking particularly similar to those found at Teotihuacan.

More thought has been put into put into the adventurer’s statistics. PSI and AGILITY play a much larger role than in the previous book where they were hardly used. In fact testing your PSI can be the difference between winning or losing in this adventure. It is still difficult to sustain your VIGOUR with few opportunities to restore it. The combat system stills leaves a lot to be desired and is predominantly based on chance. But it has been tweaked to give weight fights in favour of particular combatants.

The adventure can be quite tricky. It is certainly harder and less linear than ‘Crypt to the Vampire’. Most gamebook readers shouldn’t find it overly challenging though. Most encounters/obstacles can usually be overcome by either an item or by using your skills so that there is generally two ways to succeed, which is quite forgiving. There are some really imaginative items that are put to good use. The most memorable is the Ring of Intangibilty.

With a much better thought out storyline, greater character development and more attention to detail this is an improvement on its predecessor and one of the best books of this range. In fact, with its almost unique setting, it would stand out in any adventure gamebook series.


The Temple of Flame (Golden dragon fantasy gamebooks)
The Temple of Flame (Golden dragon fantasy gamebooks)
by Dave Morris
Edition: Paperback

4.0 out of 5 stars Explore a Mayan style temple riddled with traps, 20 Feb 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
‘Temple of Flame’ is a substantial improvement upon the first Golden Dragon fantasy gamebook, ‘Crypt of the Vampire’. A lot more effort has gone into developing a storyline that flows through the adventure. Your rivalry with the ain antagonist, Dmontir, begins from the prologue/background and adds a whole other level to the gameplay as you race against your rival to reach the centre of the Temple of Katak and the treasure that lies within. This is not just a treasure hunt, however. Your past history with Damontir and the vents of this adventure make this more about a quest for vengeance and taking a higher moral ground.

Damontir the Mad is a very well developed villain (a vast improvement upon Lord Tenebran from ‘Crypt of the Vampire’). Because the reader is able to interact with him during the adventure it makes this gamebook different from the usual idea of just facing off against the main villain in the finale at the end of the adventure. It gives Damontir a more substantial portrayal. His Nightmare guards are also somewhat different.

As you might expect from infiltrating an ancient temple, most of the opponents to be found come in the form of guards of some description or undeads. There is enough variety, though, to keep the reader amused. You also get an entertaining, and useful, sidekick. This helps to add another dimension to the adventure and increase the reader’s immersion.

There is a firm Indiana Jones influence (who is mentioned at the start of all Golden Dragon gamebooks). Most of this comes from the variety of traps the adventurer must overcome (including the evasion of a large rock ball rolling down corridors) and the Latin American setting with a search for an ancient temple in a tropical jungle. Quite clearly the Anku is based upon Mayan civilisation but there is also influence from other pre-European American cultures and some from South East Asia. The temple on the cover is ostensibly Mayan but the actual picture of the temple in the book appears architecturally to be more Toltec; looking particularly similar to those found at Teotihuacan.

More thought has been put into put into the adventurer’s statistics. PSI and AGILITY play a much larger role than in the previous book where they were hardly used. In fact testing your PSI can be the difference between winning or losing in this adventure. It is still difficult to sustain your VIGOUR with few opportunities to restore it. The combat system stills leaves a lot to be desired and is predominantly based on chance. But it has been tweaked to give weight fights in favour of particular combatants.

The adventure can be quite tricky. It is certainly harder and less linear than ‘Crypt to the Vampire’. Most gamebook readers shouldn’t find it overly challenging though. Most encounters/obstacles can usually be overcome by either an item or by using your skills so that there is generally two ways to succeed, which is quite forgiving. There are some really imaginative items that are put to good use. The most memorable is the Ring of Intangibilty.

With a much better thought out storyline, greater character development and more attention to detail this is an improvement on its predecessor and one of the best books of this range. In fact, with its almost unique setting, it would stand out in any adventure gamebook series.


Crypt of the Vampire (Golden dragon fantasy gamebooks)
Crypt of the Vampire (Golden dragon fantasy gamebooks)
by Dave Morris
Edition: Paperback

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Basic with some enjoyable moments, 18 Feb 2014
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Golden Dragon Fantasy Gamebooks were one of many adventure gamebook series to appear in the mid-eighties. ‘Crypt of the Vampire’ was the first to be released for the range and as you might expect from the title it is based around quite a traditional idea.

The storyline leaves a lot to be desired. There really isn’t much of one and the adventure relies on the vampire slaying idea with very little embellishment. There is no real explanation as to why you would be hunting down this vampire or what you are doing near his atypical estate with spooky house and crypt. It seems as if you wander in there by chance. The lack of a background/prologue section (remedied by all the following books in the series) probably makes this seem worse.
There are also no plot twists or developments within the adventure. The reader merely travels through the house and the crypt overcoming obstacles until they can find and slay the vampire. Likewise, the eponymous vampire, Lord Tenebron, is utterly the stereotypical, Dracula style portrayal. A bit more uniqueness to his character and some more interaction with the adventurer would have given the final confrontation a greater impact.

However, the passages are fairly well written and the adventure is structured quite well, albeit simplistically. It creates a reasonable level of atmosphere but this is varied and a little irregular. There are a couple of very memorable moments in the skeleton band, the unicorn battle against zombies and the strange chess game. Although just incidents in the adventure that don’t really effect the story overly much they are probably the book’s highlights and are certainly more interesting than facing Tenebron.

The biggest problem with the adventure (and all Golden Dragon books) is probably with the combat system. It is far too simple and based entirely on chance. It basically involves rolling two dice; a low score wounds you and a high score your opponent. There is no consideration of combat skill/ability or choice of weapon. A fully armoured warrior with a magic sword has no more advantage than a defenceless goblin. This can be very frustrating as rolling a few ones in a row can easily kill you. It is also quite tricky to find any way of restoring your VIGOUR once injured. There are few opportunities for this.

The other statistics, PSI and AGILITY, seem to be a bit better though out but there really isn’t a great deal of use for them in this adventure and you will rarely find them being tested.

This is a fairly easy adventure to overcome and most readers with some experience of gamebooks could probably complete this on the first read through. It is a pretty standard approach and there is little to be caught out by. It is certainly the easiest of the Golden Dragon range.


Doctor Who and the Keeper of Traken (The Dr Who Library, No 37)
Doctor Who and the Keeper of Traken (The Dr Who Library, No 37)
by Terrance Dicks
Edition: Paperback

4.0 out of 5 stars An old enemy awaits, 18 Feb 2014
The Keeper, guardian of the Source and benevolent ruler of the Trakenite Union, is dying. Before he can pass over the mantle of leadership to his successor he must avert a growing evil. And to do that he needs the help of the Doctor.

This is a good novelisation of a strong TV story. It is pretty representative of the televised version. There is little extra detail or additions but the story probably wouldn’t benefit from this particularly.

The story has some good elements; not just the return of one of the Doctor’s greatest enemies. The image of Traken society is well conceived and developed. It is different enough from others Doctor Who to stand out. The whole idea of the Melkur and its calcification fits in well with the philosophies of Traken and adds some mystery to the story. The Keeper himself is another interesting concept. The fact that he is capable of materialising inside the Tardis is quite a surprise. There is no clearer explanation within the novel of how the Source works, but that doesn’t really matter to the story. There is also no embellishment on any past relationship between the Doctor and the Keeper unfortunately.

Most of the Trakenites are well realised characters. Tremas becomes a likeable ally for the Doctor which makes his ultimate fate all the more sympathetic. The introduction of Nyssa is handled particularly well and we soon empathise with her. She also quickly establishes a relationship with Adric and the Doctor.


Sagas Of The Demonspawn, Book 1: Fire Wolf
Sagas Of The Demonspawn, Book 1: Fire Wolf
by J.H. Brennan
Edition: Paperback

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Badly executed, 16 Feb 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
As far as adventure gamebooks go this one has some fantastically written sections/paragraphs and a great storyline. But as an adventure gamebook it is an utter disaster.

Unusually for gamebooks (and ‘Sagas of the Demonspawn’ is perhaps the only gamebook series to do this as far as I’m aware) it is written in a third person perspective. It is certainly a different approach to the norm but it really doesn’t work. The whole point of adventure gamebooks is so that the reader can play the main protagonist and become utterly absorbed and involved in the adventure and the world in which it is set. The immersive nature is completely ruined when at the end of a paragraph/section the reader is presented with something along the lines of “Fire*Wolf has found himself in a difficult situation. What do you think he should do?” rather than the more usual “do you want to do X or Y”. It deliberately reminds the adventurer that they’re reading, thus ruining the atmosphere and breaking dramatic tension.

The instructions also leave a lot to be desired. I found myself checking to see whether I was missing pages. There is basically no mention of how to restore life points or how you carry or use equipment or gold. The system of weapons and armour lacks any worthwhile explanation. Armour doesn’t really come into the adventure anyway and you aren’t told what weapon most of your opponents are using. The author has gone to a lot of trouble to devise an elaborate magic system but failed to explain under what circumstances you are able to use it. The reader is left with no idea whether spells can only be used during combat or not, whether spells must be cast at the start of combat, whether only one spell can be used per combat, whether casting a spell is in addition or not to using your sword during a combat round, etc. The same problems arise when you face the Regent. There is a lot of detail about all the spells he can cast but as to when or how many times he can cast them or how he selects which to cast is anybody’s guess.

The combat system is terribly flawed and over-convoluted. As the author condescendingly keeps reminding the reader, you do understand and get used to it pretty quickly but then it is only all the more apparent that it’s not very good. Combat is a long laborious and unfulfilling task for the reader involving lots of dice rolls, annoying calculations and a lack of interactive feel. The author has tried to make it depend upon many factors and completely missed out factoring in fighting/combat skill/ability. Luck with the dice and your actual LUCK score play a big role. Statistics of enemy opponents are also located at the back of the book rather than in the section you are currently on. I can see no reason for this and it is just annoying. Furthermore there are no rules for combat against more than one opponent.

But by far the biggest problems with this book comes from some absolutely appalling editing and proof reading. Reading this book as a child when it was first published I could never complete it and considered it one of the most difficult gamebooks. I now realise that this book is actually impossible to complete as it is due to it being riddled with errors that make it unplayable. Whatever you do, wherever you go, whichever options you select will always take you to section 122, which, although a congratulatory section, fails to re-direct you anywhere else. It merely tells you to check out the selection of spells you now have at your disposal at the back of the book. I believe the only possibility is that it should re-direct you to section 124. I can’t see how else this adventure can be completed.

Here are a few more pointers that might help you out if you are trying to complete this adventure:
1) Paragraph 170 should re-direct you to paragraph 180 if you are successful in testing your ATTRACTION (it only re-directs you if you fail).
2) Paragraph 131 should at least give you one SKILL point.
3) Paragraph 160 should probably give you the option of going to 178.
4) Numerous paragraphs tell you to return to your key failing to tell you that’s at 146.

The adventure sheet appears to have been designed by someone who hasn’t read the book and is extremely minimalistic. There is nowhere to list equipment, weapons or gold and two of the most vital of your statistics, POWER and SKILL, have been missed off.
It’s extremely irritating that a storyline with much potential to be a great adventure gamebook has been ruined by a lack of care and attention. It completely doesn’t function as a gamebook.


Doctor Who and Warriors' Gate (Number 71 in the Doctor Who Library)
Doctor Who and Warriors' Gate (Number 71 in the Doctor Who Library)
by John Lydecker
Edition: Paperback

2.0 out of 5 stars A dull rendition, 16 Feb 2014
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As the Doctor desperately tries to find a way to escape from E-space, the Tardis and its crew become trapped in a strange void. But what is the nature of this void and who else is trapped there?

For the most part this is a fairly basic novelisation relating events of the televised programme. The only major alteration/addition comes in the form of some sort of prologue that provides a background as to how a group of privateers and their ship end up in the same predicament as the Doctor and his companions. This isn’t very worthwhile and it includes characters that are never to be mentioned again. It adds nothing to the story particularly and is, perhaps, more distracting than anything.

The strength of the televised version was in the visual impressions it made; the stark emptiness of the void, the lonely gate standing in the endless whiteness, the eerie vision of the tranquil gardens, the transitions in time between the opulent banquet hall and its state of collapsed decay in a later age. These all helped to bring the story to life but the novelisation really doesn’t capture their essence; its descriptions uninspiring. In consequence the story feels much blander than its TV counterpart and lacking in events.

The novelisation also suffers from a lack of variance in pace between different events and circumstances. The text is occasionally a little monotonous. This isn’t helped by a lack of any chapters. It is also printed in such a way that it is not always clear when there is a break in the text between scenes.

Most to the privateers are quite bland stereotypical based characters. Adric and K-9 feel like they’re included just because they have to be and there is very little for them to do most of the time. Even the characterisation of the Doctor is, at times, a bit lacking and lifeless. Romana is treated really well though and her angst and emotional state against the slavery she encounters and her impending return to Gallifrey are a good insight. Biroc and the other Tharils are somewhat better better expanded than they were on the television. Their ironic demise from slavers to slaves is one of the better elements of the story but if there is meant to be a moral message there it is a little vague.


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