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Fabled Lands : The Court of Hidden Faces
Fabled Lands : The Court of Hidden Faces
by Jamie Thomson
Edition: Paperback
Price: 5.60

5.0 out of 5 stars An addictive, highly enjoyable gamebook, 26 Aug 2014
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Quite possibly my favourite of the Fabled Lands series as it stands (who knows whether the second half will ever see publication) , ‘The Court of Hidden Faces’ feels like a culmination of the first five books. Although Fabled Lands has differentiated itself from other gamebooks with its open world, free roaming environment with no set quest for the reader to follow, there is a sense of an overall plotline coming together in ‘The Court of Hidden Faces’. Throughout the course of this book and the previous ones there has been a scattering of references to the past Uttakun invasion, particularly in relation to a mythical High King and the legend of his return. A lot of these story threads can come to fruition depending upon you actions and choices throughout the Fabled Lands series.

This book sees the reader voyage into what remains of the Uttakin empire that once dominated the northern continent. Uttaku, itself is a corrupt, class orientated society and the Uttakins have become an indulgent, decadent aristocracy exploiting the land around them and impoverishing the people. Uttaku is an intriguing city with the theocratic rule of the Faceless King, and a convincing creation by the authors. There is plenty for the adventurer to do and the Uttakin court probably has more side quests/missions available than anywhere else previously in the Fabled Lands.

Of course the reader can side with the Uttakins and virtually join their corrupt society. Personally I think it is much more fun to take the path of reinstalling the High King to power. This is much more involved and requires knowledge and equipment from across the other books in the series. It also necessitates owning ‘The Plains of Howling Darkness’. Playing the two books simultaneously is quite beneficial. Overall it is probably the most complex and lengthy of the quests to be enjoyed in Fabled Lands.

There are, of course, plenty of other scenarios and quests to become involved in. The variety and quality of these is, perhaps, even better than what is to be found previously in the series. As is the development of the adventurer’s character. There are a lot of opportunities to increase your rank and attributes, but, best of all, if you choose and have made certain choices in earlier books, you can establish your own castle and community. By the end of ‘The Court of Hidden Faces’ the adventurer should hopefully feel like they have become one of the most important and influential figures in the northern continent.

This can be a very rewarding and satisfying gamebook. It, of course, can be played as a stand alone gamebook but it works much more successfully in conjunction with the rest of the series. Much of what you learn and do in the other books can come to fruition in this one. It provides the series with an extra level of depth that makes the gameplay very engrossing and addictive in ‘The Court of Hidden Faces’.


Fabled Lands 4: The Plains of Howling Darkness
Fabled Lands 4: The Plains of Howling Darkness
by Dave Morris
Edition: Paperback
Price: 5.99

4.0 out of 5 stars Explore the icy steppes in the north of the Fabled Lands, 26 Aug 2014
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The fourth of the Fabled Lands instalments takes the reader to the barren steppes and vast mountain ranges of the northern continent. As such the bulk of the surface area to be explored involves a lot of traversing the eponymous plains. They aren’t as daunting as the title might suggest, especially if your ‘scouting’ attribute is high. In fact they can be a lot of fun. There are plenty of encounters and scenarios to be found scattered around, if you can find them. The central core of the area is quite considerable as it stretches the length of the northern continent. This means it can be a bit tricky to locate certain things you have been given suggestions to find but has the advantage that you are frequently encountering things you haven’t before because they are so spread about and easily missed.

There is certainly a historical Mongolian influence loosely based around the wandering nomad tribes of the Gobi before the unification under Genghis Khan. It is certainly a marked difference to the environment of the other three Fabled Lands books that take place on the northern continent, which were all set in very much a fantasy/mediaeval European mix. The writers have successfully created an authentic feel to the environment that anyone who has travelled in the Gobi should recognise.
The journeys across the plains and steppes (and you will travel across them a lot) are not the most involved or interesting areas of the book, however.

The city of Yarimura, really the only major settlement in the book, is a multicultural conglomeration. There is clearly influence from across the various other civilisations, especially from the eastern Akatsurai. It gives it an east-meets-west feel. The islands off the eastern coast of Yarimura also have a lot to entertain concealed within them and offer a change of landscapes from the plains.

This book, with its territory spread across the length of the northern continent, perhaps more than its fellows, relies on interaction with the other books in the series. The scenario at Velis Corin is much more worthwhile if you possess knowledge of the political events within ‘The War Torn Kingdom’ of Sokara and there are multiple places like the Ruby Citadel or Kaschuf’s Keep that require knowledge gained in previous books. Nerech isn’t accessible without ‘The War Torn Kingdom’. Most of all though, ‘The Plains of Howling Darkness’ needs to be read in conjunction with ‘The Kingdom of Hidden Faces’ to unlock its best aspects (it is also impossible to set sail from the west coast of the continent without it). Of course this means the purchase of another book but it is definitely worthwhile playing these two books almost simultaneously.

The mountains that form the northern border of the map give a fascinating visual impression. The concept of a mountain range at the edge of the world that looks out to space is quite an awe inspiring image. Unfortunately, although they are worth visiting for the effect they are of little benefit to the adventurer. They suffer from the same problem that litters the Fabled Lands series; that of spending ages trying gain the rights skills, items and information to access a previously locked area only to succeed and find no reward but some form of teleportation that sends you back to a place in another book that you then have to spend ages to get back from. Annoying as that can be though it is part of the gameplay. Enjoy the mountains but don’t venture to far into them.

The quests on offer within ‘The Plains of Howling Darkness’ are sometimes a little more complicated and difficult to those in the previous Fabled Lands books but they are generally more rewarding and beneficial to the reader. Essentially this is due to their interaction with the other books in the series. Without this interaction the adventuring on offer may feel a little shallow at times.


Zygon Hunt (Doctor Who: The Fourth Doctor Adventures)
Zygon Hunt (Doctor Who: The Fourth Doctor Adventures)
by Nicholas Briggs
Edition: Audio CD
Price: 10.99

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The Fourth Doctor faces the Zygons once more, 23 Aug 2014
Always one of Doctor Who’s greatest monsters, the Zygons achieved an even higher profile with their triumphant return in the fiftieth anniversary episode. Until then their popularity generally stemmed from only one appearance almost four decades ago. Hence a return match with the Fourth Doctor must have felt long overdue. Of course this audio was made quite a while before its release when no one could have guessed that the Zygons and Tom Baker would be reappearing on television in the same episode.

This is not an out and out rematch with the Fourth Doctor, however. Nor are the Zygons the undisputed villains of the story. Instead the play concentrates on a more subtle look at them. Here the Zygons are not necessarily an invading force. In fact, some of their actions could appear to be justified considering the behaviour and attitudes of the lead human antagonist, Gregor Saraton. Saraton is clearly the most vilified character of the play whilst the most sympathetic is a Zygon.

The development of the character of Leela has been a continual focus of this series. ‘Zygon Hunt’ places her in an environment more natural to her. This gives her some advantages over the other characters, even the Doctor, who appears to be relying on her advice and instincts. There is some reminiscence in this to his trust in Leela’s ability to sense the Ruton in ‘The Horror of Fang Rock’ (a story that may well take place soon after this). However, Leela’s character is not the main focus. Instead it is the character of Mina that receives the most exploration and thus becomes one of the most interesting aspects of the play.

If anything the Zygons are a little bit under represented despite their lack of previous appearances. We learn little more about them or their skarasens (although there is an intriguing lactic fluid feeding incidence and the skarasens have been given a great roar, albeit a little reminiscent of Godzilla). Even the most important aspect of the Zygons, their ability as shapechangers, is virtually left out despite the fact that it partially defines them and has been utilised so well in their television appearances. Rather than focus on the Zygons as a species this is the personal story of a particular Zygon individual.

This is not an explosive finale to what has been, overall, an exemplary series of audios. Instead it is a story that offers the reader things to contemplate. Although there is plenty of action, at times the plot moves a little slow, it isn’t the most proactive role for the Doctor and there is, perhaps, a lack of Zygon action. However, it is well written with plenty to offer, AND it has Zygons in it. Now if only the Fourth Doctor could face the Rutons again.
Comment Comment (1) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Aug 23, 2014 8:45 PM BST


Doctor Who: Engines of War
Doctor Who: Engines of War
by George Mann
Edition: Hardcover
Price: 9.09

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Daleks and Timelords beware. The War Doctor comes to prose., 10 Aug 2014
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John Hurt’s brief role as the Doctor has undoubtedly left fans with the desire to see more of this previously unknown incarnation. This is probably unlikely to ever happen on screen again and it is entirely possible (but let’s hope not) that this novel might be the only revisit to this version of the Doctor. ‘Engines of War’ is also of importance in that it gives the War Doctor an adventure all of his own.

Obviously a novel of this nature is heavily influenced by ‘The Day of the Doctor’. However, it can’t entirely be considered a prequel as such. ‘The Day of the Doctor’ is concerned with the last days of the Time War whereas ‘Engines of War’ is a story in its own right set sometime during said war.

However, much like ‘The Day of the Doctor’ it takes inspiration from across the history of the programme, effortlessly merging references to twenty first century Doctor Who with that which came before. It takes considerable influence from three of my personal favourite stories; ‘The Deadly Assassin’, ‘Genesis of the Daleks’ and ‘The Five Doctors’. Making use of such background material helps to make this, at least for me, a very enjoyable book. Although there is a large amount of content that relies on knowledge of many Doctor Who stories this knowledge isn’t essential to understand or follow the plot. The author has created a good balance of references that enrich the novel without making it continuity obsessed or too fan indulgent.

The characterisation of the Doctor is a little varied throughout. There are times when John Hurt’s portrayal comes to the surface but often this book’s Doctor is a more generic amalgamation of Doctorish traits, usually from the twenty-first century incarnations. That is fairly understandable, however, considering the limited screen time for the War Doctor. This is also still the Doctor before the act of genocide; before he has reached the point of “no more”. There are efforts by the author to distance the character of the War Doctor from the Doctor proper. He is heavily referred to as the Predator throughout and exhibits aggressive tendencies. However, the author’s main effort is to show that the War Doctor would behave differently to the Fourth if put in the famous dilemma the Fourth Doctor faces in ‘Genesis of the Daleks’. It is not that convincing an argument though considering that the similar situation the War Doctor finds himself in in this book is not actually the same situation at all with closer consideration. The War Doctor of this novel is still very much the Doctor and it could very well be the intention of the author to steer the reader to this conclusion.

One of the most interesting aspects of the book is the parallels it draws between the Daleks and the Timelords. It seems that as the Time War escalates both indulge in hideous genetic experiments (even on their own kind) and devise or use terrible weapons of mass destruction. Indeed the main plot of this novel is whether or how such a weapon, the Tear, should be applied. The High Council of the Timelords and the Eternity Circle of Daleks definitely bare similarities in outlooks and objectives and Rassalon appears to be no better than the Dalek Emperor. It can be assumed that by the end of this novel it is the author’s intention to bring us to the conclusion that the Daleks and the Timelords are now much the same thing. After all, that is the conclusion the Doctor will reach.

If this is, unfortunately, the only new story the War Doctor will get this one has at least done his incarnation proud. Action packed and exciting whilst thought provoking all at once. There is much to be enjoyed in this story and the author clearly knows his material.
Comment Comment (1) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Aug 11, 2014 2:05 AM BST


The Abandoned (Doctor Who: The Fourth Doctor Adventures)
The Abandoned (Doctor Who: The Fourth Doctor Adventures)
by Nigel Fairs
Edition: Audio CD
Price: 10.99

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars The power of imagination threatens the Tardis crew, 9 Aug 2014
The latest Fourth Doctor audio adventure sees the Tardis crew confined to the Tardis for the duration of the story. Although it is a bit strong to suggest that this is becoming a trend, the last few years have seen a rise in Tardis based/orientated tales. Fortunately they’ve all managed to be sufficiently different from each other and this audio is no exception.

For some reason, that I’m not entirely sure the audio explains but which appears to be part of Leela’s ongoing education, the Doctor has abruptly decided to locate the ‘point of stillness’, again the play doesn’t adequately explain exactly what it is, leaving it very vague. In attempting to do so, Leela and the Doctor release a threat that seems to have dwelt deep within the Tardis since before the Doctor ‘stole’ it from Gallifrey.

The story revolves around the power of imagination. Although there is obviously a huge scope for variety and experimentation within such a topic, and this play certainly has some nice ideas contained in it, it does suffer from having overlaps and similarities with an earlier story in this series. ‘The Crooked Man’ probably uses the world of imagination and its issues in a more interesting way and it might have been better to not have two stories concerned with such similar areas in the same series.

On the plus side to this story being part of this series, it does seem to fit in very well with the current themes exhibited throughout it. The continuing tutelage of Leela is again a keen focus, in fact the instigation for the play’s events. The ongoing themes of this series such as Leela learning from the Tardis library and coming to terms with the death of her father are also prevalent. It is co-written by Louise Jameson herself who more than adequately proves that she understands and can write for the character of Leela just as well as her fellow writers of the series. The whole mentor/apprentice relationship is dealt with great understanding and there is some moving dialogue between the two main roles in this area. However, the inclusion of the horda just seems like it might have been an unnecessary whim from Jameson.

Unfortunately I found the play a little hard to listen to at times. There is a lot of it that involves quietly spoken, half whispered words or mumbled, mad mutterings. These often involve the need to crank up the volume unbelievably high to hear what is going on, some of which is still a little incomprehensible. These quiet words are often followed by insane, manic laughter or ear piercing screams which leave you diving for the volume control. This is not an audio for the car. Although these elements are no doubt present to create atmosphere and tension, I personally found it to be off putting and distracting.

However, there are some moments of good dialogue and some good performances. There is also some great interaction between Lady Marianna and the Doctor. Marianna is well written for and realised successfully in the performance (although there was the odd occasion when I expected her to bellow “a handbag”). Most of the characters are wacky and entertaining but are often only just above being irritating. There is also perhaps a little too much revealed about the Doctor’s childhood.
Comment Comment (1) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Aug 23, 2014 8:46 PM BST


Firstborn: A Tor.Com Original
Firstborn: A Tor.Com Original
Price: 0.37

3.0 out of 5 stars An early effort from a great author, 2 Aug 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Originally published in a science fiction magazine, this is one of Sanderson’s earliest works. As a short science fiction story it is quite different from the more famous of Sanderson’s works that tend to be substantial fantasy epics. The limited word count means it lacks some of the hallmarks of Sanderson’s works, his strong characterisation of a variety of individuals and his mastery at secondary creation. Instead it focusses only upon the importance of intergalactic battle tactics and the development of strategists.

It is concerned with a galactic empire whose greatest and most successful general now threatens it, and with the training of Dennison, a failure and unpromising tactician upon who the Emperor seems to have placed much misguided faith. As such the plot follows the story of Dennison as he struggles to become that which others want him to be but what he clearly doesn’t believe he is before time runs out for the empire. He isn’t the most inspiring or likeable of characters but he does invoke some sympathy and makes the story work fairly well.

Intriguing questions upon predestination and the ethics of cloning are aroused by the story but are sadly relatively ignored by it. Obviously these are issues that a longer work could more thoroughly explore. However, ‘Firstborn’, perhaps, feels that it needs more acknowledgement of such things. It could have given the book more depth in spite of its length.

Despite being a short story the text ambles a little at times but generally the story is well written and it is great value for money considering the price. it is also interesting to see one of Sanderson’s early efforts.


Over the Blood-dark Sea (Fabled Lands)
Over the Blood-dark Sea (Fabled Lands)
by Dave Morris
Edition: Paperback

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A free roaming nautical adventure, 28 July 2014
‘Over the Blood Dark Sea’ is set in the vast oceanic area centrally located between the various land masses of the world of Fabled Lands. As such it is a lot more naval orientated than the rest of the series, which, more often than not, are basically land based adventures with some coastal activity. This means that the reader spends most of their time in the company of their ship’s crew and that there isn’t so much solo adventuring.

The gameplay essentially involves sailing around a three dimensional environment experiencing chance encounters and visiting various islands or the odd coastal settlement. Of course you can travel around without your own vessel by taking passage on various ships. But this method is very restrictive and not recommended if you want to enjoy and appreciate everything the adventure has to offer. The gameplay is very explorative and there is a lot of freedom in decision and movement; perhaps more than the other Fabled Lands books. This all gives it a certain originality. On the negative side though, there is the likelihood that you can be sailing around in circles for hours, especially if you’re trying to find a certain thing. It is also quite tricky at times to orientate yourself and navigate.

In comparison to the first two Fabled Lands books there isn’t really a great deal of side quests to participate in. Even the long awaited (if you did particular things in ‘The War Torn Kingdom’) clash with Amcha, the pirate king, is a bit anticlimactic.
The islands are quite few and far between and, annoyingly, some of the trickiest tasks to overcome on the islands just end up ‘teleporting’ you somewhere random if you successful. The island with perhaps the most to do is Dweomer where you can attend a wizard school and procure your own college room. Even so more could have been made of this and it could have more interaction with the rest of the book. You could have been given several missions to do for your college for example.

Most of the worthwhile encounters are to be had on the open sea. However, without repetitively sailing up and down the same stretch of water there is a good chance you could miss the most interesting of these.

‘Over the Blood Dark Sea’ is probably less standalone than its counterparts. Due to being the central area of the world map there is a certain level of frustration in frequently finding interesting areas that you cannot enter. This is made worse due to the fact that only six of the planned twelve books have ever been published, meaning that you will never get to visit some of these places you can see from your ship. This is a great shame. However, there is still a lot to be enjoyed and no other adventure gamebook offers quite so much freedom in exploring the high seas.


Fabled Lands 3: Over the Blood-Dark Sea
Fabled Lands 3: Over the Blood-Dark Sea
by Dave Morris
Edition: Paperback
Price: 5.99

4.0 out of 5 stars A free roaming nautical adventure, 28 July 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
‘Over the Blood Dark Sea’ is set in the vast oceanic area centrally located between the various land masses of the world of Fabled Lands. As such it is a lot more naval orientated than the rest of the series, which, more often than not, are basically land based adventures with some coastal activity. This means that the reader spends most of their time in the company of their ship’s crew and that there isn’t so much solo adventuring.

The gameplay essentially involves sailing around a three dimensional environment experiencing chance encounters and visiting various islands or the odd coastal settlement. Of course you can travel around without your own vessel by taking passage on various ships. But this method is very restrictive and not recommended if you want to enjoy and appreciate everything the adventure has to offer. The gameplay is very explorative and there is a lot of freedom in decision and movement; perhaps more than the other Fabled Lands books. This all gives it a certain originality. On the negative side though, there is the likelihood that you can be sailing around in circles for hours, especially if you’re trying to find a certain thing. It is also quite tricky at times to orientate yourself and navigate.

In comparison to the first two Fabled Lands books there isn’t really a great deal of side quests to participate in. Even the long awaited (if you did particular things in ‘The War Torn Kingdom’) clash with Amcha, the pirate king, is a bit anticlimactic.
The islands are quite few and far between and, annoyingly, some of the trickiest tasks to overcome on the islands just end up ‘teleporting’ you somewhere random if you successful. The island with perhaps the most to do is Dweomer where you can attend a wizard school and procure your own college room. Even so more could have been made of this and it could have more interaction with the rest of the book. You could have been given several missions to do for your college for example.

Most of the worthwhile encounters are to be had on the open sea. However, without repetitively sailing up and down the same stretch of water there is a good chance you could miss the most interesting of these.

‘Over the Blood Dark Sea’ is probably less standalone than its counterparts. Due to being the central area of the world map there is a certain level of frustration in frequently finding interesting areas that you cannot enter. This is made worse due to the fact that only six of the planned twelve books have ever been published, meaning that you will never get to visit some of these places you can see from your ship. This is a great shame. However, there is still a lot to be enjoyed and no other adventure gamebook offers quite so much freedom in exploring the high seas.


Warbringer!: 5 (Way of the Tiger)
Warbringer!: 5 (Way of the Tiger)
by Jamie Thomson
Edition: Paperback
Price: 6.67

4.0 out of 5 stars From assassin to overlord to warlord - Avenger's journey continues, 19 July 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
‘The Way of the Tiger’ series continues to explore what is possible within the scope of an adventure gamebook. The previous book, ‘Overlord’, saw the reader adopt the role of a monarch, making political alliances and social decisions for the city. ‘Warbringer’ develops this in another direction and the reader becomes the military general for the city defending it against an invading army. The reader decides what tactics to use and what allies to make.

As you might expect from the title, ‘Warbringer’ has a different style of gameplay from the rest of the series. The emphasis is more influenced by war-gaming than adventuring. After freeing your city from occupation; the initial stages then involve consolidating your forces and preparing for the defence of your city. There are some fights to be faced during this period but essentially it involves recruiting allies, organising forces and listening to your advisors. I’m not entirely sure how much of all this is that relevant to the outcome of the adventure, but some are highly advantageous and some catastrophic.

The bulk of the book is concentrated upon the major battle against your opponents. Honoric (who you will probably remember if you have read a couple of the other books in the series) has assembled a vast number of dread allies from across the land of Orb to join his Legion of the Sword of Doom and extract vengeance upon you. There are a multitude of maps showing troop deployment and battle terrain and a lot of strategic options to select from. It all seems tremendous interesting and exciting, perhaps overwhelming, from initial impressions. However, it is a lot more simple than it looks and there isn’t a great deal of war-game elements involved. The course of the battle is based more upon your decisions than on dice rolls or some form of combat system. Playing it cautious whilst judging when to strike seems to be the best policy. Even so there is a lot of fun involved in all this and the authors successfully create the illusion that you doing more than you actually are.

Despite the focus on battle there are a lot of good characters. They do rely, however, upon the adventurer having read other books in the series as there isn’t a great deal of time for character development and they come fully established. In a way there are also other old enemies to encounter than just Honoric.

‘Warbringer’ is a positive development in ‘The Way of the Tiger’ series. It is not as original as ‘Overlord’ but is certainly as gripping and entertaining. It is probably not a good starting point to be introduced to ‘The Way of the Tiger’ adventures as it relies heavily on the previous ones. It is also a little short and could benefit, perhaps, from being a bit more complicated (but probably the authors didn’t wish to risk making it too different when it was originally published).


Destroy the Infinite (Doctor Who: The Fourth Doctor Adventures)
Destroy the Infinite (Doctor Who: The Fourth Doctor Adventures)
by Nicholas Briggs
Edition: Audio CD
Price: 10.99

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Welcome to the Eminence, 19 July 2014
This latest Fourth Doctor release sees the third, or rather the first, appearance of the Eminence. Created especially for audio they are soon becoming one of Big Finish’s the strongest, original alien species. This is the third story to be released that they have featured in and even though there have been hints and veiled references to this particular story in ‘The Seeds of War’ (featuring the Sixth Doctor) and part of the ‘Dark Eyes’ series (featuring the Eighth) this is not exactly a prequel to either. ‘Destroy the Infinite’ just happens to have been released after the other Eminence’s appearances due to the schedule of Big Finish.

Due to their development as ongoing opponents for the Doctor, what can be revealed about the Eminence within the scope of this story is somewhat limited. The gist of what they are and how they function is obvious but not much more. The full scale of the universal threat they pose isn’t really yet apparent as it is in their chronologically later appearances. The two leads do a great job of trying to sell them as a threat, especially in the closing stages of the play, but somehow their words don’t quite feel as if they match the alien race that we have seen within the confines of this audio. It feels more like the speeches that the Doctor and Leela give are more orientated to set the Eminence up for their other stories. Also, despite how threatening the Doctor claims them to be, I never really got the impression that the Doctor wasn’t in control of the situation. This is early days for the Eminence, but they are still quite a memorable presence. Their voices are excellent (although surprisingly not voiced by Nicholas Briggs).

The eponymous Infinite is a gargantuan spaceship, much in the vein of the Death Star or something similar. Indeed, the assault of the humans upon it and Leela’s attack plan is somewhat reminiscent of ‘A New Hope’. Leela’s proactive role in this space battle provides a chance for her to exhibit a military tactical ability not really seen before from her, rather than just showing her battle prowess and combat skill. It is yet another example of how this latest Fourth Doctor series has really focussed on exploring more facets of Leela and developing her as a character.

The space battle itself is a little clichéd at times. There is certainly little of surprise in it. Personally I find space battles a little tricky to listen to on audio but this one does a good job of switching the focus back to the two main leads and their situations. It gives the battle a bit more depth in this way.

‘Destroy the Inifinite’ successfully achieves what must be its main objectives; it establishes the Eminence for what could become a string of appearances and continues to develop Leela and her relationship with the Doctor. Although enjoyable it isn’t the most exciting or original story in this current Fourth Doctor series. But is has a significant role to play in Big Finish’s Doctor Who stories.
Comment Comment (1) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Aug 23, 2014 8:47 PM BST


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