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anon "anon" (london)

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Vaporetto Lecoaspira 690 - Polti steam cleaner, carpet steam cleaners, steam and vacuum, steam cleaner, vacuum cleaner
Vaporetto Lecoaspira 690 - Polti steam cleaner, carpet steam cleaners, steam and vacuum, steam cleaner, vacuum cleaner
Offered by EZYBUY4THEHOME
Price: 329.00

39 of 40 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Liable to breaking, 7 Jan 2009
Its good at doing windows, and giving mattresses and curtains a good hygenic clean, but I am afraid is very bulky and is TOTALLY unreliable. Ours has broken 3 times, and has now finally packed up. You'll get about 2 years use out of this is you're lucky.


Feeling Strangely Fine
Feeling Strangely Fine
Offered by filmrollen
Price: 8.50

5 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Pick me up music, 26 Sep 2002
This review is from: Feeling Strangely Fine (Audio CD)
I once associated Semisonic with a whole raft of British pop music. That was before I bought this album, which is now one of the stars of my collection. I love the lyrics, and the vocals, and the guitars, and the rythym.... In my opinion, DND and California are two of the best contemporary songs in terms of melody, sentiment and pure sing-along feelgood. This is the best pick me up music available.


Candide
Candide
by Voltaire
Edition: Mass Market Paperback

5 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Wise Roots of Modern Irony, 29 Aug 2001
This review is from: Candide (Mass Market Paperback)
This is a wonderful piece of literature, rich in style, humour and content. Voltaire demonstrates beuutifully the expression: "The power of accurate observation is often called cynicsm by those who don't have it". Candide's adventures, which are wildly extravagent, are a superbly accurate view of the world and show how Candide's initial naivety gradually becomes subtle wisdom of the world. The descent from the optimistic "everything is possible in the best of all possible worlds" to the depressing pessimistic realism is not for the faint-hearted. However, the final sentiment that "it is necessary to cultivate your garden" is one of the truest, wisest and most far-reaching sentiments of any conclusion.


King Lear (New Penguin Shakespeare)
King Lear (New Penguin Shakespeare)
by David M. Bevington
Edition: Paperback

3 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Powerful and Everlasting, 29 Aug 2001
The tale of Lear's betrayal by his family and subsequent tragic descent into madness is powerfully gripping. Shakespeare keeps the plot simple, but ensures that the undertones are remarkably complex. In Lear's most poignant speech, when he begins the journey to insanity, he demands that we "allow not nature more than nature needs" and forewarns that his heart will "break into a hundred thousand flaws". These predictions unfold in vivid and dramatic style throughout a play laced with reference to nature's omnipotence. The ending shatters your heart.


All My Sons (Hereford Plays)
All My Sons (Hereford Plays)
by Arthur Miller
Edition: Paperback
Price: 9.65

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Do unto others as you'd have done unto yourself, 24 Aug 2001
This epic play shows us that we will pay for our actions in the end. The brilliant webs woven by Miller keep the reader's mind racing from one character to the next throughout. As the play progresses we learn about the guilt and hauntings of each individual - from the obvious to the subtle. Slowly and with drastic emotion, these webs fall apart and the frightening skeletons are revealed. The brutal end is a thunderous warning to us all.


King Lear (The Arden Shakespeare Third Series)
King Lear (The Arden Shakespeare Third Series)
by William Shakespeare
Edition: Paperback
Price: 8.09

2 of 12 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Rich, Powerful and Tragic, 24 Aug 2001
The tale of Lear's betrayal by his family and subsequent tragic descent into madness is powerfully gripping. Shakespeare keeps the plot simple, but ensures that the undertones are remarkably complex. In Lear's most poignant speech, when he begins the journey to insanity, he demands that we "allow not nature more than nature needs" and forewarns that his heart will "break into a hundred thousand flaws". These predictions unfold in vivid and dramatic style throughout a play laced with reference to nature's omnipotence.


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